How to keep skin looking young? We asked the experts

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The beauty market is awash with anti-aging products, and the lists of ingredients in serums and creams that promise to slow down or reverse that process can be confounding.

Take a look at the fine print and you might encounter Vitamin C or green tea extract or alpha-hydroxy acids. Can anything make a difference?

We checked in with a handful of experts, including Dr. Gregory Henderson, a dermatologist and clinical instructor in dermatology at UCLA, in our search for answers.

By the way, cosmetics companies test their products extensively. The Food and Drug Administration does not test products, but can take action against a manufacturer if it has concerns over product safety.

Charcoal

Activated charcoal, which can absorb some toxins, has been used to treat alcohol and drug poisoning in emergency rooms for decades. But in the last few years, the beauty industry has embraced it, touting its ability to absorb dirt and oil. Can it be effective?

“When used as part of a mask or strip,” Henderson says, “the charcoal may help remove sebum and keratinous debris from skin pores.”

Clay and mud

Mud is sometimes used in masks that are used to hydrate the skin and is acknowledged by many in the medical community for its potential to help with skin issues. “Mud therapy,” says Henderson, “is an ancient tradition and historically has been used for inflammatory skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis.”

Clay is one of the most common ingredients found in beauty products, and experts tend to agree that it can serve a useful purpose, if used according to directions. Clay masks, designed to remove oil, dirt and dead skin cells, can be used as a delivery mechanism for ingredients — oils and emollients, for example — to ease dry skin.

Sodium hyaluronate

Sodium hyaluronate, which is used in all sorts of wrinkle and skin-repair products, is a “cousin of hyaluronic acid, a naturally occurring substance in the skin which helps hang on to water and helps give the skin a younger appearance,” says UCLA dermatologist Dr. Hayley Goldbach.

“Dermatologists often inject hyaluronic acid fillers into skin, resulting in more volume and a reduction in fine lines.” Sodium hyaluronate, designed to be applied to the skin, “has not been shown to have the same anti-aging or collagen-boosting properties as injectable hyaluronic acid.” But it continues to be included in various medical studies and papers that are focused on the efficacy of various anti-aging products.

Alpha hydroxy acids

According to Medscape, an online reference source used by medical professionals, AHAs (including glycolic and citric acids) “improve skin texture and reduce the signs of aging by promoting cell shedding” in the outer layers of the skin. But “the mechanism of the action is not completely understood.”

Caffeine

Caffeine is used in cosmetics and cosmeceuticals to counter a number of skin conditions, including the appearance of cellulite. It works, in theory, “by stimulating lipolysis — the breaking down of fat — in the skin and by improving the microcirculation,” Henderson says.

Caffeine is also found in some eye creams, promoted by cosmetic lines for its ability to shrink blood vessels under the eyes, although “its role has not been well studied.”

Green tea extract

In the last few years, there’s been a surge in the use of green tea extract in beauty products. WebMD reports that “the ingredients in tea can reduce sun damage and may protect you from skin cancer when you put it on your skin.” Henderson says that “a study combining green tree extract, caffeine and resveratrol showed reduced facial redness.”

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is one of the most popular ingredients in anti-aging products, promoted as something that can protect cells from free radicals, which can damage cell DNA, increase signs of aging and lead to cancer.

Some experts say the antioxidants found in vitamin C can assist the body’s production of collagen. But Henderson cautions: “While limited studies have shown that topical vitamin C may limit photoaging, many current preparations … are not formulated to allow the vitamin C to effectively penetrate the skin. Also unless protected from the air, most preparation became inactive without hours of opening.”

Peptides

Peptides, formed from amino acids, are “cellular messengers” of sorts and are commonly used in beauty products. According to Henderson, signal peptides may stimulate collagen production. Carrier peptides “may aid in the delivery of copper to the skin and promote smoother skin.” (Copper is said to help develop collagen and elastin.)

Algae

Many of us associate algae with unpleasant encounters in the water (seaweed, pond scum, etc.), but algae have been used in traditional diets and folk medicine for centuries.

In the beauty world, you might read about ingredients such as blue marine algae or brown algae extract. You won’t find universal agreement on their effectiveness in cosmeceuticals, but an article in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology suggests brown seaweed “could be used as a potential cosmetic ingredient to make skin firmer and smoother.”

The bottom line?

Some of the ingredients listed in the fine print on cosmetics and cosmeceuticals may actually help your skin. But what the experts really hope you’ll indulge in are rest, exercise, a healthy diet and sunscreen.

[“Source-latimes”]

Bateman Skincare Is a Brand For Handsome Young Men Who Are Young and Handsome

Image result for Bateman Skincare Is a Brand For Handsome Young Men Who Are Young and HandsomeYou know how pretty much every pop culture film is being made into a musical? Imagine that… but now with beauty. Instead of breaking scenes down into dance-y numbers and jazz hands, the concept is translated into one thematic element, this one being skin care.

Bateman Skincare takes its name from the titular character in American Psycho, Patrick Bateman. The 1991 Brett Easton Ellis novel turned year-2000 film, now turned conceptual skin care line is a highly edited collection of your six essential products: a rose hip and seaweed cleanser, an herbal balancing toner, AHA exfoliating gel, hyaluronic serum, hyaluronic moisturizer, and a zinc + clay mask.

I would imagine that a psychopathic narcissist would absolutely follow a six-plus-step skin-care routine, but Bateman Skincare errs more general; the brand claims a unisex approach to skin care that focuses on the individual, You are your own best asset printed on their card. “One of the most memorable parts of the book and movie revolves around skincare and the importance of having a routine; this adherence to structure is a cornerstone of our brand.” It also happens to be the cornerstone of any good skin-care regimen that you expect to see results from.

The line is modestly packaged in clinical amber bottles and dare I say, vaguely early 90s-typeface (I don’t know. I’m a beauty editor, not a graphic designer). Judging by the products’ ingredients, however, it all seems fairly legit from a glance — simple pared-down formulas with botanically-derived ingredients featuring face-faves, hyaluronic acid, squalene, seaweed, rose hip seed oil and witch hazel.

I asked a cosmetic chemist (who asked to remain unnamed) his opinion about the line and he gave it a blasé thumbs-up. “I don’t think this line will help much with someone with acne or any specific skin concerns. I think it’s aimed more to handsome young men who are already handsome and young.”

… Kind of like the chiseled Mr. Bateman himself, who now that I think about it, is a bit parallel to the prototypical Glossier girl… but a dude — conventionally attractive, naturally fit, and effortlessly chic yet with a staunchly disciplined focus on grooming aesthetics that gives the appearance of effortlessness.

However in an ironic yet pleasant turn, Bateman Skincare products are cruelty-free, unlike the guy it’s based on.

[“Source-allure”]

Natural Breast Augmentation safe for young mothers

Natural Breast Augmentation safe for young mothersNatural Breast Augmentation safe for young mothers
Natural Breast Augmentation — a procedure where the breasts’ size is increased by transferring fat — is completely safe for young mothers as lactation and other functions are preserved, doctors said on Saturday.

According to the doctors, women desiring to have breast augmentation should opt for the natural way because there is no use of foreign material.

There is no scar or mark left post-operative as the procedure is performed through keyhole, a minimally invasive process.

“The use of silicone implant to enhance the breast size has become passe. In the age where technological devices are becoming nano sized and surgeries becoming minimally invasive, this latest technique of natural breast implantation has gained immense popularity,” said Lokesh Kumar, Director and head of BLK Centre for Plastic and Cosmetic Surgery.

According to medical science, in Natural Breast Augmentation the size and volume of a woman’s breasts is increased using her own body.

The minimally invasive procedure is safe and quick. In a span of a few hours, a woman undergoes from a B to a C cup.

The technique is less stressful on the woman’s body and heals faster.

Additionally, the procedure has the benefit of liposuction where the fat is harvested from areas like abdomen, waist, thighs, back or buttocks.

Kumar said: “This technique is called Beauli and was invented in Germany a few years ago. During the procedure, a very high speed water jet stream is used to separate fat cells from the patient’s body.”

“With the help of a thin metal tube, fat is extracted from areas that are resistant to diet and exercise. Once the fat is loose, it can be collected in a container which is ready to be used in any part of the body for enhancement. Like, for breast augmentation, this fatty tissue is injected under and around the breast area,” said Kumar.

Rakesh Ranjan, a general surgeon from Safdarjung hospital, said: “Today the situation is such that many women are put off with the word ‘silicone’ as there has been a lot of negative publicity due to the use of bad quality implants from unethical sources/surgeons”.

“But the safety of this procedure has stood the test of time. It is simple enough to be carried out as a day care procedure,” he said.

Stating that biologically a woman loses volume in her breasts as she ages, Ranjan said: “This surgery is also for women who possess enough fat in the thighs, abdomen, back, buttocks or arms and want them to get removed, which instead can be used for breasts.”

“Post procedure, the improvement in the breasts is visible only over the next few weeks, as the swelling goes down. One can expect to see marked improvement in breast size and volume as long as the bodyweight does not change,” said Ranjan.

Stay updated on the go with Times of India News App. Click here to download it for your device.

source”cnbc”a

Young Pregnant Women More At Risk Of Stroke: Study

Young Pregnant Women More At Risk Of Stroke: Study

NEW YORK: Pregnancy in young women may increase the risk of stroke as compared to their older counterparts of childbearing age, a study has found.

The findings showed that stroke risk was more than doubled in women aged 12 to 24 years and increased significantly by 60 per cent in women 25 to 34 years during pregnancy or post partum period up to six weeks after delivery. However, there was no difference in stroke risk in women 35 years or older.

“We have been warning older women that pregnancy may increase their risk of stroke, but this study shows that their stroke risk appears similar to women of the same age who are not pregnant,” said lead author Eliza C. Miller from Columbia University Medical Centre (CUMC) in New York, US.

“But in women under 35, pregnancy significantly increased the risk of stroke. In fact, one in five strokes in women from that age group were related to pregnancy,” Miller added.

Previous studies suggested that the risk of pregnancy-associated stroke is higher in older women than in younger women.

“The incidence of pregnancy-associated strokes is rising, and that could be explained by the fact that more women are delaying childbearing until they are older, when the overall risk of stroke is higher,” noted Joshua Z. Willey, Assistant Professor at CUMC and neurologist at New York-Presbyterian Hospital in the US.
In the study, the team examined 19,146 women, aged 12 to 55 years. Of these, 797 (4.2 per cent) were pregnant or had just given birth.

They found that the overall incidence of stroke during or soon after pregnancy increased with age (46.9 per 100,000 in women age 45 to 55 vs 14 per 100,000 in women age 12 to 24).

However, pregnant and postpartum women in the youngest group (age 12 to 24) had more than double the risk of stroke than non-pregnant women in the same age group (14 per 100,000 in pregnant women vs 6.4 in non-pregnant women).

“We need more research to better understand the causes of pregnancy-associated stroke, so that we can identify young women at the highest risk and prevent these devastating events,” Miller said.

source”cnbc”

Pregnancy May Up Stroke Risk In Young Women: Study

Pregnancy May Up Stroke Risk In Young Women: StudyNEW YORK:  Pregnancy may increase the risk of strokes in younger women, but not in older women expecting a baby, a new study has found.

Pregnancy-associated stroke occurs in an estimated 34 out of 100,000 women, researchers said.

Previous studies have suggested that the risk of pregnancy-associated stroke is higher in older women than in younger women.

“The incidence of pregnancy-associated strokes is rising, and that could be explained by the fact that more women are delaying childbearing until they are older, when the overall risk of stroke is higher,” said Joshua Z Willey, assistant professor at Columbia University Medical Centre in the US.

“However, very few studies have compared the incidence of stroke in pregnant and non-pregnant women who are the same age,” said Willey.

For the study, researchers accumulated and examined data from women who were hospitalized for stroke between 2003 and 2012.

Out of these 19,146 women, age 12 to 55 years, 797 (4.2 per cent) were pregnant or had just given birth.

Researchers found that the overall incidence of stroke during or soon after pregnancy increased with age (46.9 per 100,000 in women age 45 to 55 versus 14 per 100,000 in women age 12 to 24).

Ads by ZINCHowever, pregnant and postpartum women in the youngest group (age 12 to 24) had more than double the risk of stroke than non-pregnant women in the same age group (14 per 100,000 in pregnant women versus 6.4 in non-pregnant women).

For women age 25 to 34, pregnancy increased the risk 1.6 times. Stroke risk was similar in pregnant and non-pregnant women in the older age groups.

“We have been warning older women that pregnancy may increase their risk of stroke, but this study shows that their stroke risk appears similar to women of the same age who are not pregnant,” said lead author Eliza C Miller from the NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital in the US.

“But in women under 35, pregnancy significantly increased the risk of stroke. In fact, one in five strokes in women from that age group were related to pregnancy,” Miller said.

“We need more research to better understand the causes of pregnancy-associated stroke, so that we can identify young women at the highest risk and prevent these devastating events,” said Miller.

source”cnbc”

Young engineer leaves job for his village

pic courtesy - Manstram Hathesh Facebook

In what appears as a great leap to social service, one engineer from Madhya Pradesh (MP) returns to his village after securing a covetous engineer job. Mr. Mastram Hathesh who graduated from Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology (MANIT) with material science and metallurgy decided to develop his village severed with under-development.

The young engineer pointed out that many individual from his village tends to leave their village for urban cities after securing government job.

It is speculated that many (Schedule Tribe) ST individual got government job through reservation.

“I feel that the benefits of reservation are being exploited more by the affluent class than people from underprivileged families living in rural areas. In my village, people still have to struggle for basic needs. Electricity supply is almost zero,” said Mr Mastram while pointing the hitch in reservation system.

What inspired the young engineer?

The idea of leaving a high paying job from the Bharat Oman Refineries Limited (BORL) occurred to him when no one from his village decided to turn up on his convocation day just because they were ashamed to show their faces before the people.

“Despite getting support and blessings from every villager, I was alone here because my community and family members feel shy to come out of the village and meet people. Development has not even touched the village,” said 21 years Mastram Hathesh.

“I feel that the benefits of reservation are being exploited more by the affluent class than people from underprivileged families living in rural areas. In my village, people still have to struggle for basic needs. Electricity supply is almost zero,” added Mastram, as reported in Hindustan Times.

Despite availability of education in his village Jimra, the living standard and status of the villagers remains unaltered. After learning all the vicissitudes, Mastram vowed to devote his potential towards development of his village.

source”gsmarena”

Young engineer leaves job for his village

pic courtesy - Manstram Hathesh Facebook

In what appears as a great leap to social service, one engineer from Madhya Pradesh (MP) returns to his village after securing a covetous engineer job. Mr. Mastram Hathesh who graduated from Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology (MANIT) with material science and metallurgy decided to develop his village severed with under-development.

The young engineer pointed out that many individual from his village tends to leave their village for urban cities after securing government job.

It is speculated that many (Schedule Tribe) ST individual got government job through reservation.

“I feel that the benefits of reservation are being exploited more by the affluent class than people from underprivileged families living in rural areas. In my village, people still have to struggle for basic needs. Electricity supply is almost zero,” said Mr Mastram while pointing the hitch in reservation system.

What inspired the young engineer?

The idea of leaving a high paying job from the Bharat Oman Refineries Limited (BORL) occurred to him when no one from his village decided to turn up on his convocation day just because they were ashamed to show their faces before the people.

“Despite getting support and blessings from every villager, I was alone here because my community and family members feel shy to come out of the village and meet people. Development has not even touched the village,” said 21 years Mastram Hathesh.

“I feel that the benefits of reservation are being exploited more by the affluent class than people from underprivileged families living in rural areas. In my village, people still have to struggle for basic needs. Electricity supply is almost zero,” added Mastram, as reported in Hindustan Times.

Despite availability of education in his village Jimra, the living standard and status of the villagers remains unaltered. After learning all the vicissitudes, Mastram vowed to devote his potential towards development of his village.

source”gsmarena”

Why young adults with lower education, income level are prone to obesity

25 per cent of young adults became overweight or obese, according to a research

Young adults with lower education or income level are at a higher risk of becoming overweight or obese, says a new study.

It found that 25 per cent of young adults became overweight or obese.

Emerging adulthood is a critical time period for excess weight gain: Excerpts from the journal

  • Researcher Deborah Rohm Young of Kaiser Permanente Southern California, Department of Research and Evaluation said, “Emerging adulthood is a critical time period for excess weight gain due to a variety of factors, including many teenagers leaving home for college and having more freedom and access to food.”
  • “Our study found that living in a disadvantaged place puts teens at an increased risk for being overweight or obese. Although we did not explore potential reasons for this increase, factors may include cultural norms, as well as lack of access to public parks and grocery stores,” added Young in the paper published in the journal Pediatric Obesity.

Factors of obesity:

  • Social determinants of health, which are the conditions in which people are born, live, learn, work, play, affect a wide range of health, functioning, and quality-of-life outcomes and risks, according to the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention
  •  Obesity count is based on the gender-specific body mass index (BMI) for age growth charts developed by the Centres for Disease Control
  • Also, females and blacks had almost 1.7 and 1.3 times more risk to be overweight or obese compared with males and whites, respectively.

About the research:

  • For the study, the researchers examined the health records of 22,823 ethnically diverse individuals who were in the age group of 18 years for four years with normal weight based on BMI less than 25
  • Over a period of four years, researchers found that about 23 per cent of the normal-weight teenagers with low education living in neighbourhoods became overweight and about 2 per cent of those became obese who are living in lower income neighbourhoods.
  • source”gsmarena”

Young workers like those high-deductible health plans

The big boys are embracing health plans with big deductibles.

Slightly more than half of large employers analyzed in a new report now offer their workers at least one high-deductible health insurance plan, underscoring a broad trend nationally toward such coverage.

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Agnieszka Wozniak | Caiaimage | Getty Images

And slightly more than 40 percent of workers at large firms that give them the option are choosing the high-deductible option over a traditional health plan, according to the report issued Tuesday byBenefitfocus, a provider of benefits-management software.

Benefitfocus also found that younger workers were much more apt to choose the high-deductible option when given the choice. These plans tend to have lower monthly premium payments for their enrollees than traditional health plans.

But they also require enrollees to pay more in out-of-pocket charges when they obtain health services than what they are required to pay under traditional plans. The minimum deductible for a high-deductible plan is $1,300 for self-only coverage, and $2,600 for family coverage.

Benefitfocus’ report was based on an analysis of actual 2015 enrollment data from about 500 employers with more than 1,000 workers apiece. In all, the report reflects enrollment choices of more than 700,000 workers.

High-deductible plans have become increasingly common in recent years as companies and insurers look for ways to control health spending. The plans are seen as encouraging more careful shopping for and consumption of health services, such as by opting for a generic drug as opposed to a brand-name prescription.

Jeff Oldham, vice president of Benefitfocus’s Benefitstore, compared traditional plans to “all-you-can-eat” pizza buffet for a college student, who has no financial incentive to moderate his consumption of slices.

Workers who don’t use a lot of health services can realize significant savings by enrolling in a high-deductible plan — while also running the risk of paying a lot more if they end up needing health care.

Oldham told CNBC that the embrace of high-deductible plans by employers reflects the fact that “they’d pretty much run out” of options to control health-care costs and utilization of health benefits by tweaking the design of traditional plans.

Oldham also said that the trend toward high-deductible coverage is a reaction by employers who want to avoid Obamacare’s coming “Cadillac Tax,” which starting in 2020 will impose a surcharge on health plans whose premiums exceed a certain maximum threshold.

Asked if both factors will lead to more companies offering high-deductible plans in the future, Oldham said, “Absolutely.”

The plans’ offer of paying-less-now/possibly-pay-more-later is most attractive to millennials, those workers who were born between 1980 and 1998, and decreasingly attractive as workers get older, according to the Benefitsfocus report.

The report found that 44 percent of millennials working at the large firms analyzed opted for a high-deductible health plan when given the choice.

That compares to just 22 percent of workers who were born in 1948 or before, a group defined as “Traditionalists” by the report.

“This could simply be the result of familiarity (HDHP’s are less of a novelty for millennials, while Traditionalists might be more reluctant to change), or that of income (millennials presumably earn less than older generations and therefore choose to spend less on premiums),” the report said.

Although millennials were the biggest fans of high-deductible plans, they also were the least avid participants in health-savings accounts, which the plans are paired with.

HSAs are tax-advantaged tools designed to help participants save and invest money that they may need later for out-of-pocket costs. HSAs allow participants to contribute pretaxed pay to the account; allow them to invest that money without the capital gains being taxed; and also allow them to withdraw money from the account without paying taxes as long as they use the funds for qualified medical expenses.

Benefitsfocus’ report found that between individual and family accounts, participants in high-deductible plans analyzed contributed only just about 42 percent of the maximum amounts allowed for HSAs in 2016. The maximums are $3,350 for a self-only high-deductible plan, and $6,750 for a family plan, with workers 55 and older allowed to kick in an extra $1,000 against both limits.

The average single, 25-year-old worker analyzed by the report contributed just 22 percent of his maximum allowed HSA contribution.

Millennials think themselves “to be indestructible,” which could lead them to put less in HSA’s than their older colleagues, Oldham said.

He also noted that many millennials enter the workforce with significant amounts of student loan debt, which can limit their ability or inclination to contribute to HSAs.

[“source -pcworld”]