Sam Johnson wants us to rethink the way we look at cancer

With sister Connie in the final stages of advanced cancer, actor Samuel Johnson has once again expressed his frustration that there is still no cure for the hideous disease.

And while his latest Instagram post could be considered offensive to some, we’re positive that was not his intention.

Johnson, 39, shared his thoughts on the Love Your Sister social media page today, starting by saying, “If cancer wore a burqa would we have cured it already?”

image: http://prod.static9.net.au/_/media/Network/Images/2017/07/12/13/21/HONEY-Insta-cancer-rant.png

Image: Instagram @loveyoursister

What we think he meant by that comment is that if cancer were vilified the way those who wear burquas are WRONGLY targeted, if we focused all that energy wasted on mistakenly assuming all Muslims are terrorists, then cancer would probably have been eradicated by now.

His message seeming to be: Stop inventing fake problems and focus on targeting the real ones, like cancer.

The actor writes, “We want all the freedoms and we want them all now. We hate and kill other humans, for freedom from each other.

“For a freedom cancer doesn’t permit.

“75% of us live in real fear of a home-grown terrorist attack, while cancer will detonate and kill 50,000 of us this year. In our own backyard. Not in some province we can’t pronounce, let alone point to on a map.

“Rather than chanting for death, I choose to fight for life. Ideological rant over. xsam”

Followers of the cancer fundraising page have chosen to accept Johnson’s comments in the spirit in which they were intended, with @maso_chick who has experience with breast cancer saying, “Nope .. a burqa hides everything.”

The actor responded, “Cancer cares not of burquas or bikinis…”.

Connie before her final public appearance. Image: Instagram @loveyoursister

@amelie73 also chose to take his comments at face value, saying, “I know of no-one personally that has been killed by terrorism, but have lost two relatives, two colleagues, a dear neighbour, and one sweet young man to cancer.

“My father-in-law lost all his eight siblings to cancer.

“I live every day with the feeling that if I get it, it won’t be a huge shock. Governments please fund our defence against this actual menace, that’s killing thousands of Australian’s each year.

“Help us.”

Sam and Connie promote a fundraising drive. Image: TODAY

Samuel Johnsons’ sister Connie, 40, is dying from an aggressive form of cancer, her third experience with the disease since the age of 12.

Initially diagnosed with bone cancer, she recovered and lead a normal life until being diagnosed with uterine cancer at 22, and then breast and liver cancer at age 33.

Since her most recent cancer battle, brother Sam has dedicated his life to raising money for cancer research, establishing the charity Love Your Sister which has raised $5 million to date.

Last week the devastated actor wrote a love letter to his sister who is suffering through the final stages of the cruel disease, saying, “I wish I could soften your pain, or lessen your fear, or give you something tangible, but tangible clearly isn’t in season.

“I’m proud to walk you to the hardest part of the road. The end. The only part of the road in your life that must sadly be traveled alone.”

[“Source-honey”]

Intel wants to make its Internet of Things chips see, think, and act

20160127 intel superbowl city

Rolling out the internet of things means using devices as our eyes and ears and even asking them to make decisions for us. The chips at the heart of those devices play critical roles, and on Tuesday some of them got better at their jobs.

While ARM introduced two minuscule processor architectures with security features borrowed from larger chips, Intel unveiled its Atom E3900 chips with improved computer vision and industrial-grade timing.

The E3900s are designed for a wide range of applications, including manufacturing and surveillance, and they’ll soon be joined by a version specifically for vehicles, called the A3900.

Intel is working to help machines evolve from accurately sensing what’s going on around them to acting on those senses. For example, if a device can see defective parts going through an assembly line, it can alert someone or even stop the line. Cameras in cars could see that the driver is drowsy and set off an alarm in the car, and ones pointed in front of the vehicle could tell a pedestrian from a shadow and stop the car – if its vision was accurate enough.

Rival Qualcomm also improved its chips for IoT vision recently.

The E3900s have more computing power than their predecessors (by 1.7 times), along with faster memory speeds and memory bandwidth. But they also have better graphics and vision: 3D graphics performance is 2.9 times higher than in the previous generation, and the new chips can render 4K Ultra HD video on as many as three independent displays, Intel says.

Those three screens could be the virtual dashboard of a car and two seat-back displays for passengers to watch videos. By controlling each separately, the chip could make sure the dash display isn’t affected by the rendering activity happening on the entertainment screens, said Ken Caviasca, vice president of Intel’s IoT group.

The new chips are also better at capturing and processing images. They have four vector image processing units to perform video noise reduction, improve low-light image quality, and preserve more color and detail.

In a networked video recorder, an E3900 could take 1080p video streams from 15 cameras and display their feeds simultaneously at 30 frames per second on a video wall, Caviasca said.

Visual processing needs to keep getting better as technology evolves from rendering images to decoding content and on to image processing. The last step is computer vision, where machines understand what they see well enough to make decisions.

“What people are wanting is a processor that can sense like we do in an environment,” Caviasca said. And rather than just report back to humans, it can take action.

For industrial uses, the E3900 series gets Intel’s TCC (Time Coordinated Computing) technology. This feature lets the chip tightly control the timing of a device’s actions.

Some industrial systems rely on precise timing to be productive. For example, a robotic arm that takes parts off a conveyor belt needs to act when each object comes along. The more tightly the arm is synchronized with the rest of the system, the faster the assembly line can run.

Adding TCC, which wasn’t in the e3800 series, cuts the maximum delay to about one-tenth what it would have been. There are also uses for this technology in the automotive world, Caviasca said.

source”cnbc”

Reddit: The ‘front page of the internet’ wants to be a billion-dollar businessReddit:,The,‘front,page,of,the,internet’,wants,to,be,a,billion-dollar,business

In July 2015, Reddit changed into in a crisis. Volunteer moderators, the heartbeat of the website thatappearance after pages called “Subreddits”, were revolting over the firing of a key member of the webnetwork .

nearly three hundred and sixty five days on, the site which payments itself as thefront page of the net“, is making an attempt to position the controversy at the back of it and grow up.

we’re in a far better region than we had been a year in the past, and that i think a 12 months from nowwe’ll be in an even higher place,” Steve Huffman, leader executive and one of the co-founders of Reddit,informed CNBC in an interview at the next net conference in Amsterdam ultimate month.

Reddit boasts 234 million precise users and hosts links posted by using humans which are grouped roundSubreddits – classes for just about whatever.

but the website hasn’t had the fine recognition for cheap debate and Reddit frequently being visible as a Wild West with regularly-offensive comments.

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Qualcomm wants to make kids’ wearables a issue

Joon

Why should grown-u.s.have all the a laugh? Qualcomm has developed a brand new chipset that pursuitsto construct a global wearables market for kids.

Smartwatches for the below-12 set are already popular in a few Asian countries, including Korea,providing a way for parents to hold music of their youngsters once they’re faraway from home.

Qualcomm hopes its new chipset, referred to as the Snapdragon put on 1100, will assist take that phenomenon international. It’s running with a few partners who plan to release wearables for childrenlater this 12 months.

The chipset includes GPS for region monitoring and LTE assist for making calls.

“You’ll usually know in which your seven-yrvintage daughter is — she will usually call you. And if she leaves college when she’s now not alleged to, you’ll understand where she is,” stated Pankaj Kedia, head of Qualcomm’s clever watches department, at the Computex alternate show in Taipei.

the brand new chipset isn’t always best for youngstersmerchandise. Qualcomm says it is for any devicewith restricted, centered talents. That also can consist of smartwatches for the aged, fitness trackers orclever headsets.

these gadgets cognizance on two, 3 or 5 use instances and do them sincerely nicely,” Kedia stated.

It builds on the damage 2100, Qualcomm’s first committed chipset for wearables announced in February.whilst that device can run Android, Android wear, webOS and otherhighstage” OSes, the 1100 runs most effective Linux and RTOS.

Snapdragon wear

Qualcomm
How the wear 2100 and put on 1100 shape up
the brand new chipset additionally has much less components than the 2100, making it smaller andcheaper. It doesn’t have integrated sensors that tune movement, as an example. Qualcomm says it couldrun LTE on standby for every week without being recharged.

One tool maker that plans to use the 1100 is Infomark. It makes a youngsters’ smartwatch known as the Joon, based totally on an older 3G Qualcomm chipset, which sells in Korea for US$100-$150. It plans tolaunch new devices with the 1100 chipset later this 12 months.

numerous different Qualcomm companions right here stated they deliberate to release kids productstoo, which includes SurfaceInk and Aricent.

Qualcomm stated each chipsets, the 1100 and 2100, will deliver within the 2nd half of the yr.

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Microsoft’s fascinating GigJam service is open to anyone who wants an invite

Microsoft's GigJam is aimed at helping people work together.

Anyone can get into the private beta of MIcrosoft’s new GigJam productivity service, which is aimed at helping teams of people collaborate in real time over the Internet, the company announced Thursday.

GigJam combines data from a variety of services including Microsoft’s own Office 365, Trello, Dropbox, and Salesforce. Users can then bring that information into a shared workspace, allowing them to quickly work together.

Users can easily redact part of the information they’re sharing with other people, meaning they can selectively share only what needs to be seen in order to get a job done.

There’s no way around it: GigJam is a kind of wacky product Microsoft has built to help people get work done together. But what’s interesting is that it’s emblematic of the company’s current approach to the productivity market — focused on letting people quickly and independently collaborate across different services while maintaining a secure environment.

Here’s how it works: One user starts a “Gig,” and then pulls in information from whatever services they need, like email, Salesforce, Office documents, and Asana tasks. That information shows up as a card inside GigJam, where users can highlight some information inside a card, redact other information, and then send the whole bundle off to another user for review or editing.

The second person only sees the information that’s being shared with him, so they’re not able to access other parts of the information that the Gig’s originator has in front of her.

Microsoft’s fascinating GigJam service is open to anyone who wants an invite

Microsoft's GigJam is aimed at helping people work together.

Anyone can get into the private beta of MIcrosoft’s new GigJam productivity service, which is aimed at helping teams of people collaborate in real time over the Internet, the company announced Thursday.

GigJam combines data from a variety of services including Microsoft’s own Office 365, Trello, Dropbox, and Salesforce. Users can then bring that information into a shared workspace, allowing them to quickly work together.

Users can easily redact part of the information they’re sharing with other people, meaning they can selectively share only what needs to be seen in order to get a job done.

There’s no way around it: GigJam is a kind of wacky product Microsoft has built to help people get work done together. But what’s interesting is that it’s emblematic of the company’s current approach to the productivity market — focused on letting people quickly and independently collaborate across different services while maintaining a secure environment.

Here’s how it works: One user starts a “Gig,” and then pulls in information from whatever services they need, like email, Salesforce, Office documents, and Asana tasks. That information shows up as a card inside GigJam, where users can highlight some information inside a card, redact other information, and then send the whole bundle off to another user for review or editing.

The second person only sees the information that’s being shared with him, so they’re not able to access other parts of the information that the Gig’s originator has in front of her.

New crowdfunding marketing campaign wants to deliver Amazon’s Alexa to smartwatches

cowatchAmazon hasn’t announced any plans to make its own smartwatch, but a brand new Indiegogo campaign is promising the followingexceptional factor.

CoWatch claims to be the ”global’s first Amazon Alexa integrated smartwatch.” similar to the Amazon Echolinked speaker, CoWatch will tap into Amazon’s voice services for controlling smart home gadgets, ordering rides from Uber, including matters for your purchasing list, and soliciting for site visitors and weatherreports, among different makes use of.

There’s no mention of any professional involvement from Amazon, however that may not be importantgiven that Alexa is now available to 1/3party hardware makers. (you may even build your own dirtcheapAlexa tool with a Raspberry Pi and some different additives.)

Alexa aside, the CoWatch is reasonably preferred smartwatch fare, the usage of Bluetooth to pair withboth an Android smartphone or iPhone. It has a round, constantly-on remarkable AMOLED display,stainless steel and zirconia ceramic body, step counter, coronary heart rate sensor, and water resistance.inside, there’s a 1.2 GHz twincore processor, 1GB of RAM, and 8GB of storage, and the battery supposedly lasts as much as 32 hours on a price. A wireless charging cradle is blanketed in the package.

The watch is a collaboration between iMCO, a touchrecognized electronics firm primarily based in China, and Cronologics, whose wearable operating device may also appear on the upcoming Blocks modular smartwatch. Cronologics’ CEO, Leor Stern, previously labored at IFTTT and spent a decade at Googleearlier than that.

virtual tendencies managed to get a preview of the watch, and stated that the software programstill hasa far way to go to provide a smooth experience,” though domestic controls and to-do lists regarded towork as advertised. Stern promised that the experience might get better beforehand of release.

Early backers gained’t have to wait long to discover. CoWatch claims that it will deliver 800 watches—already in manufacturingwithin three weeks of the Indiegogo campaign’s cease, and could deliver alldifferent orders within ninety days. Early chook pricing is enticing at $159 to $350, but don’t neglect howsome of these crowdfunded wearable memories stop.

Why this subjects: Being able to control your home, order pizza, check your bills, and purchase familyitems from an Amazon Echo is quality, however placing one of the constantly-listening audio system inevery room is probably impractical. An Alexa-enabled smartwatch should fill in for all those instanceswhilst the Echo isn’t to be had; the best query is whether or not CoWatch is only a holdover until Amazon builds a smartwatch of its own.

Why Instagram wants to re-order your photo feed

Instagram will soon rearrange its users’ feeds based on relevancy rather than chronological order, the photo-sharing app said in an official blogpost on Tuesday.

Instagram said it hopes that a more tailored feed will improve the overall user experience. The company told CNBC it’s using machine learning to detect patterns and adapt to users’ behavior.

“If your favorite musician shares a video from last night’s concert, it will be waiting for you when you wake up, no matter how many accounts you follow or what time zone you live in,” the company said. “And when your best friend posts a photo of her new puppy, you won’t miss it.”

Instagram’s parent company, Facebook, made similar changes on its feeds earlier this year.

Twitter also introduced a similar feature earlier this year. As a result, Twitter said users tended to tweet and retweet more.

Instagram’s change will roll out in the coming months, and during what it called an extended testing period, the company will be accepting feedback on those changes, Instagram said.

[“source-gsmarena”]

FCC wants ISPs to get customer permission before sharing personal data

FCC building in Washington

Broadband providers would often be required to get customer permission to use and share personal data they collect under regulations proposed by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission.

Broadband providers have an unrivaled ability to track customers and collect personal data, and there currently are no specific rules covering broadband providers and customer privacy, FCC officials said Thursday.

The goal of the rules is to give broadband customers notice, choice and control over their personal data, FCC officials said during a press briefing.

“Your ISP handles all of your network traffic,” FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler wrote in the Huffington Post. “That means it has a broad view of all of your unencrypted online activity — when you are online, the websites you visit, and the apps you use.”

On mobile devices, providers can track customers’ physical locations, he added. “Even when data is encrypted, your broadband provider can piece together significant amounts of information about you — including private information such as a chronic medical condition or financial problems — based on your online activity,” Wheeler said.

The proposed rules, to be debated during the FCC’s March 31 meeting, would allow broadband providers to send information about new deals and deliver Web-browsing functionality without seeking further customer permission.

The proposal, which would go out for public comment if approved later this month, would allow broadband customers to opt out of data collection for the broadband providers’ internal and affiliate marketing and other communications-related services. For all other purposes, including most sharing of personal data with third parties, broadband providers would be required to get customers’ opt-in permission to use and share customer personal data.

The rules don’t prohibit ISPs from using the personal information they collect, “only that since it is your information, you should decide whether they can do so,” Wheeler wrote. “This isn’t about prohibition; it’s about permission.”

Wheeler’s proposal would also require Internet service providers to notify customers about data breaches of personal data, with affected users notified within 10 days of discovery of the breach. More than 40 U.S. states have data breach notification laws, but there’s no national standard.

ISP trade groups have called on the FCC to avoid passing an extensive set of new rules that specifically target providers.

“Consumer information should be protected based upon the sensitivity of the information to the consumer and how the information is used — not the type of
business keeping it, how that business obtains it, or what regulatory agency has authority over it,” five ISP trade groups said in a letter to the FCC this month.

Some ISPs and trade groups have questioned the need for new rules by noting the that use of encryption and virtual private networks is growing among broadband users.

But broadband customers shouldn’t have to rely on encryption or VPNs to protect their personal data against sharing by providers, FCC officials said.

The move of the FCC toward new privacy rules for ISPs is related in part to the agency’s reclassification of broadband as a regulated, common-carrier service in new net neutrality rules passed in February 2015. Reclassification of broadband moved the authority for policing broadband privacy from the Federal Trade Commission to the FCC, privacy groups have said.

Under common-carrier rules, “the information collected by the phone company about your telephone usage has long been protected information,” Wheeler wrote.  FCC rules “limit your phone company’s ability to repurpose and resell what it learns about your phone activity. The same should be true for information collected by your ISP.”

Privacy advocate Jeffrey Chester, executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy, called the proposed rules a “major step forward” for privacy in the U.S.

“Today, Americans have really no privacy when they go online, use mobile phones, or stream videos,” he said. “They face a growing threat to their privacy as cable and phone company broadband ISPs construct a powerful and pervasive data gathering apparatus

[“source-gsmarena”]