Alternative medicine might help treat premature ejaculation

Reuters | Jan 28, 2017, 01.54 PM IST

Alternative medicine might help treat premature ejaculation (Thinkstock Images)Alternative medicine might help treat premature ejaculation (Thinkstock Images)
Complementary and alternative medicine options may help men manage premature ejaculation, according to a new review of existing research.

The improvements were small, and the studies were of varying quality, but preliminary evidence suggests that acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, Ayurvedic herbal medicineand a Korean topical cream may all have desirable effects, researchers conclude in the journal Sexual Medicine.

“There are a range of treatments available for premature ejaculation, including drug treatments, behavioral techniques and counseling, however, some men may not want to visit the doctor, take drugs long-term or be on a long wait list for counseling,” said lead author Katy Cooper of the University of Sheffield in the UK.

“It’s important to evaluate the evidence for other therapies,” she told Reuters Health by email. “To our knowledge, this is the first systematic review to assess complementary and alternative medicine for premature ejaculation.”

According to the International Society for Sexual Medicine, premature ejaculation can be a lifelong problem, and this primary form of the problem is usually defined as ejaculation happening within one minute of initiating vaginal intercourse every time a man has ever had sex. A man’s “latency time” can also become reduced later in his sexual life, and this secondary form is usually defined as ejaculation within three minutes or less.

In the current study, researchers evaluated 10 randomized controlled trials that included comparisons either to another type of treatment or to a placebo, or dummy, treatment. Two studies were of acupuncture, five were of Chinese herbal medicine, one of Ayurvedic herbal medicine and two of Korean topical “severance secret” cream.

Together, the two acupuncture studies found that the treatment slightly increased intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) by about half a minute compared to placebo.

Chinese herbal medicine increased IELT by about two minutes, Ayurvedic herbal medicine increased IELT by nearly a minute and topical cream increased IELT by more than eight minutes.

In some instances, a combination of traditional and alternative options was the most effective. For example, Chinese medicine paired with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) increased IELT by two minutes longer than SSRIs alone and nearly three minutes longer than the Chinese medicine alone.

“There are no approved treatments for premature ejaculation,” said Donald Patrick, vice chair for research at the University of Washington in Seattle. “This is a common condition that has serious psychological effects on relationships,” said Patrick, who wasn’t involved in the study. “We need treatments to address it, and it should be treated with equal seriousness as erectile dysfunction.”

The prevalence of premature ejaculation is difficult to measure because of the differing definitions of the problem and some men’s reluctance to report it. Some studies suggest that between 20 and 30 percent of men report early ejaculation concerns, but the International Society for Sexual Medicine estimates that about 4 percent of men have a lifelong condition.

“Although it is not openly discussed in the media – at least not as much as erectile problems have been discussed in the post-Viagra era – numerous studies report men feel frustrated, depressed and anxious because of this problem,” said Ege Can Serefoglu of the Bagcilar Training and Research Hospital in Istanbul, Turkey.

source”cnbc”

Romantic love hormone may help treat psychosexual disorders

 

Romantic love hormone may help treat psychosexual disordersRomantic love hormone may help treat psychosexual disorders

Men who were given an injection of a naturally occurring hormone showed enhanced activity in brain regions involved with sexual arousal and romantic love, decline in negative moods as well as helping treat some psychosexual disorders that commonly occur in patients with infertility, a study has found.

Kisspeptin has been linked to sexy and romantic feelings and is essential to the body’s reproductive system.

“Our study indicates that kisspeptin plays a role in stimulating some of the emotions and responses that lead to sex and reproduction,” said lead author Waljit Dhillo, Professor at Imperial College London.

“Kisspeptin boosts sexual and romantic brain activity as well as decreasing negative mood. This raises the interesting possibility that kisspeptin may have uses in treating psychosexual disorders and depression which are major health problems which often occur together,” added Alexander Comninos from Imperial College London.

For the study, the team involved 29 healthy heterosexual young men who were given either an injection of kisspeptin or placebo who were shown a variety of images, including sexual and non-sexual romantic pictures of couples.

The findings demonstrated that men who received the injection of kisspeptin, had enhanced activity in structures in the brain typically activated by sexual arousal and romance.

This shows that kisspeptin boosts behavioural circuits associated with sex and love, the researchers said.

Further, the volunteers also underwent MRI scans where they were shown sexual and non-sexual romantic, negative, and neutral-themed images, and images of happy, fearful and neutral emotional faces.

Kisspeptin did not appear to alter emotional brain activity in response to neutral, happy or fearful-themed images.

However, when volunteers were shown negative images, kisspeptin did enhance activity in brain structures important in regulating negative moods, suggesting that then hormone might be used for treating depression, the researchers stated.

The study is detailed in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

source”cnbc”

Marijuana could help treat drug addiction, depression

Nov 17, 2016, 02.05 PM IST

Marijuana could help treat drug addiction, depressionMarijuana could help treat drug addiction, depression
Using marijuana could help some alcoholics and people addicted to opioids kick the habit and may also help people suffering from depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and social anxiety, says a study.

“Research suggests that people may be using cannabis as an exit drug to reduce the use of substances that are potentially more harmful, such as opioid pain medication,” said the study’s lead investigator Zach Walsh, Associate Professor at University of British Columbia’s Okanagan campus in Canada.

The study published in the journal Clinical Psychology Review is based on a systematic review of research on the medical cannabis use and mental health as well as reviews on non-medical cannabis use.

However, the review concluded that cannabis use might not be recommended for conditions such as bipolar disorder and psychosis.

“In reviewing the limited evidence on medical cannabis, it appears that patients and others who have advocated for cannabis as a tool for harm reduction and mental health have some valid points,” Walsh said.

It is important to identify ways to help mental health professional move beyond stigma to better understand the risk and benefits of cannabis, Walsh added.

“There is not currently a lot of clear guidance on how mental health professionals can best work with people who are using cannabis for medical purposes,” Walsh said.

source”cnbc”

Wearable device can reduce fat, treat type 2 diabetes

PM IST

Wearable device can reduce fat, treat type 2 diabetes (Getty Images)Wearable device can reduce fat, treat type 2 diabetes (Getty Images)
Scientists from Japan have developed a wearable medical device that can help diabetic elderly or overweight people to lose fat and treat type 2 diabetes.

The device developed by Kumamoto University affects visceral fat loss and improves blood glucose (sugar) by helping overweight or elderly people exercise, which is effective for the treatment of diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes is a disease of systemic organ failure due to chronic hyperglycemia and inflammation from the accumulation of excess visceral fat.

Metabolic disorders such as hyperglycemia attenuate stress resistance in the human body and exacerbate insulin resistance.

The heat shock response (HSR) is activated as a response to stress in the human body, but its function decreased in those with type 2 diabetes.

A research team from the university has found that by restoring the function of HSP72 — the main protein of HSR — improved glucose-related abnormalities.

The researchers developed a belt-type medical device that uses a special type of rubber.

“This device is very easy to use since it simply attaches to the abdomen and it has a low-impact on the patient. One can expect the effects to be similar to exercise therapy,” Tatsuya Kondo, who led the research, said in a statement.

The team then performed a clinical trial of MES + HS on 40 obese men suffering from type 2 diabetes.

Results showed a decrease fasting glucose levels, a loss of visceral fat, improve insulin resistance and a significant improvement in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values.

“Even in patients who have difficulty exercising, such as those who are overweight, elderly, or have some form of disability, this device can be expected to provide acceptable treatment in addition to conventional diabetic medical care,” Tatsuya added.

The research appeared in journal Scientific Reports

source”cnbc”

iPad game may treat lazy eye condition in kids

IANS | Nov 13, 2016, 02.35 PM IST

<p>iPad game may treat lazy eye condition in kids<br></p>iPad game may treat lazy eye condition in kids

A special type of iPad game effectively helped in treating children with amblyopia in restoring their visual abilities, more than the standard treatment, researchers say.

Amblyopia — also known as the lazy eye — is the leading cause of monocular visual impairment — a condition in which vision in both eyes is used separately and one of the eyes has no vision with adequate vision in the other — in children.

Amblyopia has traditionally been viewed as a monocular disorder that can be treated by patching the fellow eye to force use of the amblyopic eye, but it does not always restore 20/20 vision or teach the eyes to work together.

In the study, the researchers from Retina Foundation of the Southwest in Texas, US, randomly assigned 28 children (average age, seven years) with amblyopia to binocular iPad game treatment and to patching treatment.

The action-oriented adventure iPad game required children to wear special glasses that separate game elements seen by each eye so that reduced-contrast elements are seen by the fellow eye, high-contrast elements are seen by the amblyopic eye, and high-contrast background elements are seen by both eyes.

The results revealed that the amblyopic eye showed best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at the two-week visit.

At two weeks, the children using the standard approach of patching crossed over to binocular game treatment, and all 28 children played the game for another two weeks.

“We show that in just two weeks, visual acuity gain with binocular treatment was half that found with six months of patching, suggesting that binocular treatment may yield faster gains than patching,” said Krista R. Kelly of the Retina Foundation of the Southwest, a non-profit organisation.

source”cnbc”

Wearable device can reduce fat, treat type 2 diabetes

13, 2016, 05.00 PM IST

Wearable device can reduce fat, treat type 2 diabetes (Getty Images)Wearable device can reduce fat, treat type 2 diabetes (Getty Images)
Scientists from Japan have developed a wearable medical device that can help diabetic elderly or overweight people to lose fat and treat type 2 diabetes.

The device developed by Kumamoto University affects visceral fat loss and improves blood glucose (sugar) by helping overweight or elderly people exercise, which is effective for the treatment of diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes is a disease of systemic organ failure due to chronic hyperglycemia and inflammation from the accumulation of excess visceral fat.

Metabolic disorders such as hyperglycemia attenuate stress resistance in the human body and exacerbate insulin resistance.

The heat shock response (HSR) is activated as a response to stress in the human body, but its function decreased in those with type 2 diabetes.

A research team from the university has found that by restoring the function of HSP72 — the main protein of HSR — improved glucose-related abnormalities.

The researchers developed a belt-type medical device that uses a special type of rubber.

“This device is very easy to use since it simply attaches to the abdomen and it has a low-impact on the patient. One can expect the effects to be similar to exercise therapy,” Tatsuya Kondo, who led the research, said in a statement.

The team then performed a clinical trial of MES + HS on 40 obese men suffering from type 2 diabetes.

Results showed a decrease fasting glucose levels, a loss of visceral fat, improve insulin resistance and a significant improvement in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values.

“Even in patients who have difficulty exercising, such as those who are overweight, elderly, or have some form of disability, this device can be expected to provide acceptable treatment in addition to conventional diabetic medical care,” Tatsuya added.

source”cnbc”

Gene Therapy May Treat Alzheimer’s

Gene Therapy May Treat Alzheimer's

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Gene Therapy May Treat Alzheimer’s
Delivering a gene directly into brain may offer a potential new therapy for halting Alzheimer’s .
LONDON: Researchers at the Imperial College in London have found that delivering a specific gene via an injection directly into the brain may offer a potential new therapy for halting the progress of Alzheimer’s disease, especially when treated in its early stages.

In the study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team used a type of modified virus to deliver a gene to brain cells of mice.

“Although these findings are very early they suggest this gene therapy may have potential therapeutic use for patients,” said senior study author Magdalena Sastre.

Previous studies by the same team suggest this gene, called PGC1 – alpha, may prevent the formation of a protein called amyloid-beta peptide in cells in the lab.

Amyloid-beta peptide is the main component of amyloid plaques, the sticky clumps of protein found in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. These plaques are thought to trigger the death of brain cells.

The modified virus used in the experiments was called a lentivirus vector, and is commonly used in gene therapy explained Professor Nicholas Mazarakis, co-author of the study.

In the new study, the team injected the virus, containing the gene PGC-1 – alpha, into two areas of the brain in mice susceptible to Alzheimer’s disease.
The areas targeted were the hippocampus and the cortex, as these are the first regions to develop amyloid plaques in Alzheimer’s disease.

The animals were treated at the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease.

After four months, the team found that mice who received the gene had very few amyloid plaques, compared with the untreated mice, who had multiple plaques in their brain.

Furthermore, the treated mice performed as well in memory tasks as healthy mice.

The team also discovered there was no loss of brain cells in the hippocampus of the mice who received the gene treatment.

In addition to this, the treated mice had a reduction in the number of glial cells, which in Alzheimer’s disease can release toxic inflammatory substances that cause further cell damage.

 

Gene Therapy May Treat Alzheimer’s: Study

Gene Therapy May Treat Alzheimer's: Study

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Gene Therapy May Treat Alzheimer’s: Study
The finding was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
LONDON: Injecting a specific gene directly into the brain may offer a potential new therapy for halting the progress of Alzheimer’s disease, especially when treated at an early stage, a new study has claimed.

Scientists from Imperial College London in the UK used a type of modified virus to deliver a gene to brain cells in mice.

Previous studies by the same team suggest this gene, called PGC1 – alpha, may prevent the formation of a protein called amyloid-beta peptide in cells in the lab.

Amyloid-beta peptide is the main component of amyloid plaques, the sticky clumps of protein found in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease. These plaques are thought to trigger the death of brain cells.

Worldwide 47.5 million people are affected by dementia – of which Alzheimer’s is the most common form, researchers said.

There is no cure, although current drugs can help treat the symptoms of the disease.

Ms Magdalena Sastre, the senior author of the research, hopes the new findings may one day provide a method of preventing the disease or halting it in the early stages.

“Although these findings are very early they suggest this gene therapy may have potential therapeutic use for patients,” said Ms Sastre.

“There are many hurdles to overcome, and at the moment the only way to deliver the gene is via an injection directly into the brain. However this proof of concept study shows this approach warrants further investigation,” she said.
The modified virus used in the experiments was called a lentivirus vector, and is commonly used in gene therapy, said Professor Nicholas Mazarakis, co-author of the study.

In the new study, the team injected the virus, containing the gene PGC-1 – alpha, into two areas of the brain in mice susceptible to Alzheimer’s disease.

The animals were treated at early stages of Alzheimer’s when they still had not developed amyloid plaques.

After four months, the team found that mice who received the gene had very few amyloid plaques, compared with the untreated mice, who had multiple plaques in their brain.

The treated mice also performed as well in memory tasks as healthy mice. The tasks included challenges such as replacing a familiar object in the mouse’s cage with a new one. If the mice had a healthy memory, they would explore the new object for longer.

The team also discovered there was no loss of brain cells in the hippocampus of the mice who received the gene treatment.

The treated mice had a reduction in the number of glial cells, which in Alzheimer’s disease can release toxic inflammatory substances that cause further cell damage.

The team suggests injections of the gene would be most beneficial in the early stages of the disease when the first symptoms appear.

source”cnbc”

Arthritis Drug May Help Treat Rare Eye Disease: Study

Arthritis Drug May Help Treat Rare Eye Disease: Study

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Arthritis Drug May Help Treat Rare Eye Disease: Study
The popular arthritis medication may help to treat a rare eye disease that can lead to loss of vision.
LONDON: A popular rheumatoid arthritis medication may effectively treat non-infectious uveitis, a rare eye disease that can lead to loss of vision, a new study has claimed.

The drug contains the active agent adalimumab, a therapeutic human monoclonal antibody, researchers including those from Medical University of Vienna said.

“We were able to prospectively demonstrate for the very first time that non-infectious uveitis can also be successfully treated with a cortisol-free medication,” said Talin Barisani-Asenbauer from MedUni Vienna.

“That will significantly improve the management of uveitis patients who have only partially responded to corticosteroids, need a corticosteroid sparing therapy or who are unsuitable for treatment with corticosteroids,” said Barisani-Asenbauer.

“The biologic medication adalimumab has long been used to treat rheumatic diseases and has to be injected subcutaneously every two weeks. For sufferers, steroid-free means there are fewer side-effects, so that it can be used over a longer period of time,” said Barisani-Asenbauer.
Uveitis is the name used for inflammatory conditions of the inner eye, in particular the uvea, which consists of the iris and the ciliary body in the front section and the choroid in the back section.

Inflammation can also affect other parts of the eye, such as the retina and the vitreous body. 70-90 per cent of sufferers are aged between 20 and 60 and are in the middle of their working lives, researchers said.

The first symptoms are floaters in the visual field, blurred vision, visual disturbances and photosensitivity.

Potential complications of uveitis are macular oedema (accumulation of fluid in the retina), glaucoma or cataracts, for example. Uveitis can even lead to loss of vision, they said.

(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

source”cnbc”

Arthritis Drug May Help Treat Rare Eye Disease: Study

Arthritis Drug May Help Treat Rare Eye Disease: Study

LONDON: A popular rheumatoid arthritis medication may effectively treat non-infectious uveitis, a rare eye disease that can lead to loss of vision, a new study has claimed.

The drug contains the active agent adalimumab, a therapeutic human monoclonal antibody, researchers including those from Medical University of Vienna said.

“We were able to prospectively demonstrate for the very first time that non-infectious uveitis can also be successfully treated with a cortisol-free medication,” said Talin Barisani-Asenbauer from MedUni Vienna.

“That will significantly improve the management of uveitis patients who have only partially responded to corticosteroids, need a corticosteroid sparing therapy or who are unsuitable for treatment with corticosteroids,” said Barisani-Asenbauer.

“The biologic medication adalimumab has long been used to treat rheumatic diseases and has to be injected subcutaneously every two weeks. For sufferers, steroid-free means there are fewer side-effects, so that it can be used over a longer period of time,” said Barisani-Asenbauer.
Uveitis is the name used for inflammatory conditions of the inner eye, in particular the uvea, which consists of the iris and the ciliary body in the front section and the choroid in the back section.

Inflammation can also affect other parts of the eye, such as the retina and the vitreous body. 70-90 per cent of sufferers are aged between 20 and 60 and are in the middle of their working lives, researchers said.

The first symptoms are floaters in the visual field, blurred vision, visual disturbances and photosensitivity.

Potential complications of uveitis are macular oedema (accumulation of fluid in the retina), glaucoma or cataracts, for example. Uveitis can even lead to loss of vision, they said..

source”cnbc”