EXERCISE CAN BE PUNISHING – BUT HERE’S HOW TO STOP THINKING OF IT AS A PUNISHMENT

Image result for EXERCISE CAN BE PUNISHING – BUT HERE’S HOW TO STOP THINKING OF IT AS A PUNISHMENTThe fitness industry is said to be worth £4.4bn in the UK alone. But, despite medical research telling us that exercise will help us live longer, the majority of people do not engage with health and fitness. Could it be that exercise is still considered a punishment – as it was in Victorian prisons?

Or do we just need to increase the fun and social aspect to exercise to get more of us working up a sweat?

Medical research suggests exercise is good for our health and will help us all live longer. But a report by the British Heart Foundation says that 20 million people living in the UK are physically inactive.

To be considered active, the Department of Health recommends adults should accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity activity per week. So it begs the question: why do close to a third of the country’s population struggle to meet this recommended amount of exercise, when doing so could prolong their life?

A reason why inactive people may not engage in enough exercise is because it is not perceived to be a fulfilling or satisfying leisure pursuit. Other competing pastimes of a more sedentary nature, such as watching TV, reading and gaming, are seen by some as being more enjoyable.

Exercise as punishment

The treadmill was devised as a form of punishment for convicted criminals in the Victorian era. At this time, prisoners had to undertake long hours of hard labour by walking on treadmills to grind flour. This form of punishment was abolished in the late 19th century for being too cruel.

Exercise also has a long history of being used as a form of correctional behaviour in schools. Indeed in 2014 the then-Education Secretary, Nicky Morgan, proposed to ban exercise being used in schools as a form of punishment for fear that it would put children off being active.

Given that exercise has a lengthy historical association with the use of discipline for the purpose of punishment and obedience, can 21st century society ever be truly accepting of exercise as a leisure pursuit that can have personal fulfilment?

At present, the high volume of inactivity levels in the UK suggests a large amount of people are not motivated to take exercise. Getting people to be more active, therefore, would require a shift in people exercising because they want to rather than having to.

Making it social

My research explores the role of social psychology for the development of interventions that make physical activity a fulfilling pursuit for long-term condition sufferers. This is because social psychological science has consistently demonstrated that people are motivated to seek social connections in order to fulfil their psychological needs as human beings. For example, “the belongingness hypothesis” states that people have a basic need to feel closely connected to others.

So it is important people have positive social exercise experiences that enrich their quality of life and, in doing so, make the pursuit of exercise a more satisfying and worthwhile activity. This can be achieved by creating exercise environments that provide individuals with a shared sense of social connectedness, creating opportunities for people to form friendships, meaningful attachments and mutually supportive relationships.

For example, the EuroFit programme takes a unique approach for improving men’s health and fitness by allowing fans to train in the environment of a professional football club they support. City Ride events are another example, where families and friends of all ages and abilities can enjoy cycling together through the streets of a vibrant traffic-free environment. Similarly, walking sports offer a social atmosphere of fun, laughter and camaraderie for those who may have difficulty participating in high impact activities.

Connecting people in dynamic and socially rewarding exercise environments has the potential to offset the drudgery often associated with exercise and make it a leisure pursuit worth doing.

[“Source-independent”]

Parts of Mediterranean diet shown to prevent colorectal cancer

mediterranean diet components

New research singles out a few key elements of the Mediterranean diet that are most important for colorectal health.
The benefits of the so-called Mediterranean diet have been hailed in the news over recent years. Now, new research looks closely at the elements of the diet that could help to prevent the risk of colorectal cancer.

Among many other benefits, the Mediterranean diet has been shown to lower the risk of colorectal cancer. But the specifics of this beneficial role have not been studied in depth.

New research – presented at the ESMO 19th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, held in Barcelona, Spain – singles out the few components of the Mediterranean diet key for preventing colorectal cancer. The first author of the study is Naomi Fliss Isakov, Ph.D., of the Tel-Aviv Medical Center in Israel.

More specifically, the research looks at the link between the components of the diet taken both separately and in combination, as well as the risk of developing advanced colorectal polyps.

Colorectal cancer tends to develop from advanced polyps, or adenoma. However, the chances of polyps becoming malignant depend on various factors, including size, structure, and location.

Zooming in on the Mediterranean diet

Dr. Isakov and team examined 808 people who were undergoing either screening or diagnostic colonoscopies.

The participants were aged between 40 and 70 years old and were not at a high risk of colorectal cancer. The researchers took anthropometric measurements – such as body mass index (BMI) and height – of the participants, and they asked them to fill in a food frequency questionnaire. They also took part in a medical and lifestyle interview.

The researchers defined adherence to the Mediterranean diet as an above-average consumption of fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and whole grains, as well as fish and poultry.

A below-median intake of red meat, alcohol, and soft drinks was also considered to be a key component of the diet. A Mediterranean diet was also described as having “a high ratio of monounsaturated to saturated fatty acids.”

For the purposes of the study, the researchers defined advanced polyps as adenomas larger than 10 millimeters in size, with a “high-grade dysplasia or villous histology.”

As the American Cancer Society (ACS) explain, the term “dysplasia” refers to the abnormal aspect of the polyps. “High-grade dysplasia” is a term used to describe polyps that appear abnormal or cancer-like. The ACS also note that larger adenomas tend to have a villous growth pattern and are more likely to lead to cancer.

Dr. Isakov and colleagues also examined healthy controls who did not have any polyps, either in the past or at the time of the study.

More fish, fruit reduces risk

Having compared individuals with polyp-free colonoscopies and those whose colonoscopy showed advanced polyps, the authors found a clear association between components of the Mediterranean diet and the risk of colorectal cancer.

People with advanced polyps reported consuming fewer elements of the Mediterranean diet. More specifically, the average was 1.9 Mediterranean diet components in the advanced polyps group, compared with 4.5 components in the polyp-free group.

Surprisingly, even two or three elements of the diet correlated with a 50 percent reduction in the risk of advanced polyps, compared with consuming no key components at all.

Additionally, the risk further decreased as the number of Mediterranean elements increased. The more elements of the Mediterranean diet people consumed, the lower were the chances of advanced polyps showing up in their colonoscopies.

The researchers adjusted for other risk factors associated with colorectal cancer and found that increased fish and fruit consumption, together with a low intake of soft drinks, was most likely to reduce the risk of advanced polyps.

We found that each one of these three choices was associated with a little more than 30 percent reduced odds of a person having an advanced, pre-cancerous colorectal lesion, compared to people who did not eat any of the MD [Mediterranean diet] components.”

Naomi Fliss Isakov, Ph.D.

She concluded, “Among people who made all three healthy choices the benefit was compounded to almost 86 percent reduced odds.”

ESMO spokesperson Dr. Dirk Arnold, of the Instituto CUF de Oncologia in Lisbon, Portugal, also comments on the findings, saying, “This large population-based cohort-control study impressively confirms the hypothesis of an association of colorectal polyps with diets and other lifestyle factors.”

“This stands in line with other very recent findings on nutritive effects, such as the potential protective effects of nut consumption and vitamin D supplementation which have been shown earlier this year.”

“However,” adds Dr. Arnold, “it remains to be seen whether these results are associated with reduced mortality, and it is also unclear if, and when a dietary change would be beneficial.”

Next, the authors plan to investigate the effects of the Mediterranean diet in a group at high risk of developing colorectal cancer.

[“Source-medicalnewstoday”]

How to keep skin looking young? We asked the experts

Image result for How to keep skin looking young? We asked the experts

The beauty market is awash with anti-aging products, and the lists of ingredients in serums and creams that promise to slow down or reverse that process can be confounding.

Take a look at the fine print and you might encounter Vitamin C or green tea extract or alpha-hydroxy acids. Can anything make a difference?

We checked in with a handful of experts, including Dr. Gregory Henderson, a dermatologist and clinical instructor in dermatology at UCLA, in our search for answers.

By the way, cosmetics companies test their products extensively. The Food and Drug Administration does not test products, but can take action against a manufacturer if it has concerns over product safety.

Charcoal

Activated charcoal, which can absorb some toxins, has been used to treat alcohol and drug poisoning in emergency rooms for decades. But in the last few years, the beauty industry has embraced it, touting its ability to absorb dirt and oil. Can it be effective?

“When used as part of a mask or strip,” Henderson says, “the charcoal may help remove sebum and keratinous debris from skin pores.”

Clay and mud

Mud is sometimes used in masks that are used to hydrate the skin and is acknowledged by many in the medical community for its potential to help with skin issues. “Mud therapy,” says Henderson, “is an ancient tradition and historically has been used for inflammatory skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis.”

Clay is one of the most common ingredients found in beauty products, and experts tend to agree that it can serve a useful purpose, if used according to directions. Clay masks, designed to remove oil, dirt and dead skin cells, can be used as a delivery mechanism for ingredients — oils and emollients, for example — to ease dry skin.

Sodium hyaluronate

Sodium hyaluronate, which is used in all sorts of wrinkle and skin-repair products, is a “cousin of hyaluronic acid, a naturally occurring substance in the skin which helps hang on to water and helps give the skin a younger appearance,” says UCLA dermatologist Dr. Hayley Goldbach.

“Dermatologists often inject hyaluronic acid fillers into skin, resulting in more volume and a reduction in fine lines.” Sodium hyaluronate, designed to be applied to the skin, “has not been shown to have the same anti-aging or collagen-boosting properties as injectable hyaluronic acid.” But it continues to be included in various medical studies and papers that are focused on the efficacy of various anti-aging products.

Alpha hydroxy acids

According to Medscape, an online reference source used by medical professionals, AHAs (including glycolic and citric acids) “improve skin texture and reduce the signs of aging by promoting cell shedding” in the outer layers of the skin. But “the mechanism of the action is not completely understood.”

Caffeine

Caffeine is used in cosmetics and cosmeceuticals to counter a number of skin conditions, including the appearance of cellulite. It works, in theory, “by stimulating lipolysis — the breaking down of fat — in the skin and by improving the microcirculation,” Henderson says.

Caffeine is also found in some eye creams, promoted by cosmetic lines for its ability to shrink blood vessels under the eyes, although “its role has not been well studied.”

Green tea extract

In the last few years, there’s been a surge in the use of green tea extract in beauty products. WebMD reports that “the ingredients in tea can reduce sun damage and may protect you from skin cancer when you put it on your skin.” Henderson says that “a study combining green tree extract, caffeine and resveratrol showed reduced facial redness.”

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is one of the most popular ingredients in anti-aging products, promoted as something that can protect cells from free radicals, which can damage cell DNA, increase signs of aging and lead to cancer.

Some experts say the antioxidants found in vitamin C can assist the body’s production of collagen. But Henderson cautions: “While limited studies have shown that topical vitamin C may limit photoaging, many current preparations … are not formulated to allow the vitamin C to effectively penetrate the skin. Also unless protected from the air, most preparation became inactive without hours of opening.”

Peptides

Peptides, formed from amino acids, are “cellular messengers” of sorts and are commonly used in beauty products. According to Henderson, signal peptides may stimulate collagen production. Carrier peptides “may aid in the delivery of copper to the skin and promote smoother skin.” (Copper is said to help develop collagen and elastin.)

Algae

Many of us associate algae with unpleasant encounters in the water (seaweed, pond scum, etc.), but algae have been used in traditional diets and folk medicine for centuries.

In the beauty world, you might read about ingredients such as blue marine algae or brown algae extract. You won’t find universal agreement on their effectiveness in cosmeceuticals, but an article in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology suggests brown seaweed “could be used as a potential cosmetic ingredient to make skin firmer and smoother.”

The bottom line?

Some of the ingredients listed in the fine print on cosmetics and cosmeceuticals may actually help your skin. But what the experts really hope you’ll indulge in are rest, exercise, a healthy diet and sunscreen.

[“Source-latimes”]

HOW TO GET RID OF DARK CIRCLES UNDER THE EYES

dark-circles-lead-image.jpg

What is the best way to banish under-eye bags? / Getty/iStockphoto

A build-up of late nights, early mornings and constant use of smartphones has left many of us with burdened by the appearance of dark under-eye circles but just how do you get rid of them?

Something we all struggle with, you’ve no doubt Googled the best way to banish your bags but a regular routine of seven to eight hours sleep and not drinking any alcohol before bed just isn’t always feasible.

Alas, it’s time hit refresh on tired peepers with a little help from some well-versed beauty heroes.

Aside from getting more kip, staying hydrated is key because when the body is starved of water, it responds by retaining as much as it can, thus causing puffy under-eye circles. As such, opt for a hydrating, gentle cleanser or make-up remover so not to cause any trauma or irritation which could cause inflammation.

Alternatively, there are a slew of topical treatments that can help you on your way. The first of which is retinoids which help to stimulate the production of collagen, making the skin less thin while recovering volume and firmness.

A word of warning here though, this ingredient when used in its purest form is rather potent and as such, can irritate the sensitive skin around the eye area. Instead, opt for a cream that contains a lower dose of retinol and work from there.

When it comes to applying said eye creams, other key ingredients to look out for include hyaluronic acid and glycerin. For best results, apply at night so the skin around your eyes doesn’t become irritated or inflamed and again in the morning.

If you feel like your moisturiser could do with a boost, using an eye massager like Foreo’s IRIS will do the trick. Known to promote blood flow to the area, regular use of a beauty tool like this will prevent blood from pooling in the capillaries under the eyes and increase product absorption.

When all else fails, remember you’ve still got makeup and a hardworking concealer will work wonders while you’re attempting to improve your eye bags.

Here, look to the beauty world’s obsession with colour correcting and opt for a cover-up that will counteract dark circles. If yours err towards a bluish purple tone then a yellow concealer is best while any redness should be tackled with a green-tones product to help camouflage it.

[“Source-independent”]

DEA does not need warrant to subpoena Oregon prescription drug information

A three-member panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Monday that the Drug Enforcement Administration does not need a court-ordered warrant to subpoena information from Oregon's Prescription Drug Monitoring Program. It also found the ACLU should not have been allowed to intervene in the case.  (Associated Press photo)

A three-member panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Monday that the Drug Enforcement Administration does not need a court-ordered warrant to subpoena information from Oregon’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program. It also found the ACLU should not have been allowed to intervene in the case. (Associated Press photo) (AP Photo)

A federal appeals panel ruled Monday that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration can issue a subpoena for information in an Oregon database that tracks doctors and the narcotics they prescribe without getting a court order, reversing a lower court ruling.

The three-member panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals found the federal law that grants subpoena power to the agency preempts Oregon law, which requires a court order.

Congress enacted the Controlled Substances Act, in part, “to strengthen law enforcement tools against the traffic in illicit drugs” and allows federal authorities to obtain such information through a subpoena, the appeals panel noted.

State law directly conflicts with the federal statute, providing that the Oregon Health Authority disclose information from its prescription monitoring program in response to a court order based on probable cause.

Oregon’s law undermines the intent of Congress to empower the Drug Enforcement Administration, the panel ruled.

The appeals court also found that the U.S. District Court shouldn’t have allowed the American Civil Liberties Union to intervene in Oregon’s case against the DEA because it failed to establish independent standing.

U.S. District Judge Ancer L. Haggerty ruled in 2014 that patients have a reasonable expectation of privacy for their prescription records and that law enforcement officials must seek a warrant for information from Oregon’s database.

The Drug Enforcement Administration appealed.

The Oregon Legislature created the monitoring database in 2009 to log prescriptions filled by pharmacies in the state, the physicians who prescribed the narcotics and the patients who use them. The state included privacy protections, including the court order. The database went live two years later.

The Drug Enforcement Administration argued it could use administrative subpoenas under the Controlled Substances Act.

The state sued the agency after it issued three subpoenas for database information. The American Civil Liberties Union joined the case on behalf of four patients and a doctor, taking the state’s argument one step further in contending that federal agents must have probable cause and a signed search warrant for the information.

The subpoenas could violate a person’s Fourth Amendment right to privacy and unreasonable search and seizure, the ACLU argued. The ACLU sought a court injunction.

Haggerty didn’t analyze whether the ACLU had the right to intervene, and instead found that the DEA violated privacy rights asserted by the ACLU, the appeals panel’s opinion said.

“We reverse without reaching the merits of the Fourth Amendment claim,” the appeals panel said. Because the ACLU is seeking a different outcome than the state, it needed to show independent standing to intervene in the case and it did not, the panel ruled.

The DEA’s two administrative subpoenas sought records of a single patient and two prescribing physicians, not records related to the ACLU, the appeals court said.

The appeals panel said it recognized the “particularly private nature of the medical information” at issue and said the ACLU’s concern about disclosure wasn’t unreasonable. Yet even so, the ACLU lacked standing because it and those it represented weren’t “under an impending threat of disclosure.”

The appeals court did point out that the state still has the power to resist a DEA administrative subpoena, which would require the DEA to then get a court order for the information.

The appeals panel described this step as “a critical safeguard in light of the particularly important privacy interest implicated here.”

Attorney Nathan Freed Wessler, a New York-based lawyer who argued the appeal for the American Civil Liberties Union, said he was disappointed.

Next month, the ACLU will appear in federal court in Utah in a separate lawsuit and make the same argument that the DEA violates privacy rights by using “mere administrative subpoenas.”

“The court recognizes that medical records are private and sensitive and therefore require strong legal safeguards,” Wessler said. “Regrettably, it held that our clients lacked ‘standing’ to press for those safeguards in this litigation.”

[“Source-oregonlive”]

How to prevent hair loss for men

How to prevent hair loss for men

Losing your hair to male pattern baldness can seriously knock your confidence and self-esteem. Thankfully, there are many solutions available today that can help you fight balding and keep your full head of hair. From surgical procedures to topical creams or oral medication, there are many methods for guys to choose from when it comes to beating hair loss and retaining their confidence. Here are some of the best methods of dealing with hair loss.

#1. Scar-Free Hair Transplants

Many guys want to do something about their receding hairline and get back to their normal head of hair, but they’re particularly worried about the prospect of getting a hair transplant since they don’t want to be left with a scar at the back of their head. Whilst longer hair can easily cover any scars left by a hair transplant, men who prefer to wear their hair shorter are understandably worried about the prospect of visible evidence of the procedure. In comparison to the traditional ‘strip method’ of hair transplants, this method, known as follicular unit extraction (FUE) involves harvesting grafts one at a time using tiny punches that will be virtually undetectable once healed. For more information on a hair transplant NYC, visit NY Metro Vein.

#2. Laser Light Therapy

Laser light therapy is well-known for its effectiveness when it comes to hair removal, but it can also be useful for encouraging your hair to grow and stopping the signs of male pattern baldness. Laser light can be used to encourage the protein synthesis needed for healthy hair growth and regeneration, along with stimulating more blood flow to the scalp, resulting in better growth. However, bear in mind that this treatment doesn’t always work for everybody. In general, it is the best option for guys who have noticed receding hair and want to maintain what they have left, along with encouraging some regrowth. If you’re considering laser light therapy then the research is solid; studies have shown that around 80% of people who use laser treatment for hair loss experience less shedding and around half even get thicker hair.

#3. Medications and Medicated Hair Products

When it comes to the various medications and other products that you can use to help prevent hair loss and encourage regrowth, there is a range of options to choose from. Amongst men, over-the-counter drugs such as Finasteride are very popular, since they can be easily obtained from your local pharmacy and offer a range of further health benefits on top of preventing hair loss, such as aiding in the prevention of prostate cancer. This drug is also known as Propecia. It works by blocking the production of a particular male hormone in the scalp, which contributes to hair loss. If you’re worried about side effects then you’ll be glad to hear that the risks are minimal when taking this medication; there’s a tiny 2% chance that you will experience sexual problems, but this should immediately disappear if you stop taking the pills.

[“Source-standardmedia”]

Late announcer’s blog praised for drawing attention to breast cancer

Mao Kobayashi, who died of breast cancer on Thursday, is shown in a photo she posted soon after she began blogging. | KYODO

Following the death Thursday of popular TV presenter Mao Kobayashi from breast cancer, patient groups praised the blog she started to chronicle her battle with the disease, saying it helped raise public awareness of it.

Kobayashi used the blog to describe her family and daily life in detail.

Ikuko Nakazawa, a 65-year-old caretaker with a group of cancer patients in Tokyo’s Koto Ward, praised Kobayashi’s efforts.

“I think the blog showed the importance of staying together with a family,” Nakazawa said.

Since Kobayashi’s husband, kabuki actor Ichikawa Ebizo, announced last year that she was being treated for progressive breast cancer, a different group of cancer patients in Tokyo’s Meguro Ward has been receiving many messages and inquiries about the disease.

The blog has triggered interest and raised awareness, said a 64-year-old staff member from the group.

“Some patients may be disappointed by Mao’s death, but I want them to know there are many patients who overcome the disease,” said the staff member, who was treated for breast cancer 13 years ago. “I want young people to check themselves every month for lumps in their breasts, as well as get routine checkups.”

Eiko Yamaguchi, a 37-year-old Tokyo resident who is also a mother, agreed, saying Kobayashi triggered women to become more aware of their health.

Since Kobayashi came out with her story, Yamaguchi said she herself became more conscious about her health and believes “many women, motivated by the blog, went for health checkups.”

Three months after Ebizo announced his wife was battling cancer, Kobayashi started blogging about it. Her positive, future-oriented attitude to life with cancer attracted more than 2.5 million registered readers.

In her first post, she wrote that, thanks to her doctor’s advice “not to hide behind cancer,” she realized how her identity as a patient had dominated her mind and life and led her more and more toward the shadows.

“I have decided to say goodbye to the me who has been hiding behind cancer by using this blog as a tool, because I want to become a woman who lives her life vigorously and also be a strong mother for my children,” she wrote.

On the blog, she described her feelings when she was diagnosed with breast cancer, and when she lost her hair due to the side effects of chemotherapy. While reporting on her daily life with her family, she also acknowledged her worsening health, at one point saying the cancer had metastasized.

She sometimes posted photos of herself with a worn out but smiling face.

“I always pray to God, ‘Please give me a chance to support actor Ichikawa Ebizo as his partner,’” Kobayashi said when she appeared on a TV program featuring her husband that aired in January.

On Friday, the BBC, which had previously added Kobayashi to a list of influential women, reported that her blog was “groundbreaking in a country where people do not like to discuss personal issues.”

In November, the network picked Kobayashi as one of the 100 “most influential and inspirational women” in the world, noting that her blog, launched in September the same year, was “inspiring not only those who are also fighting cancer but many others.” Kobayashi was the first Japanese to make the annual list.

In a story contributed to the BBC at the time, Kobayashi said: “My life has been rich and colorful — I’ve achieved dreams, sometimes clawed my way through, and I met the love of my life. I’ve been blessed with two precious children. My family has loved me, and I’ve loved them. So I’ve decided not to allow the time I’ve been given to be overshadowed entirely by disease. I will be who I want to be.”

On Saturday morning, Ebizo posted a blog post saying, “From now on, I will be a dad and a mom.”

He added: “I will do the things Mao would have wanted to do and the life she would have wanted to live.”

 

 

 

[“source-japantimes”]

Government to create 10,000 vacancies for certified yoga teachers

The number of yoga trainers in the country has increased 30% in the past two years, according to estimates by the AYUSH ministry. Photo: HT

The number of yoga trainers in the country has increased 30% in the past two years, according to estimates by the AYUSH ministry. Photo: HT

New Delhi: The government plans to create 10,000 vacancies of certified yoga trainers as more people take to the traditional practice, an official in the central government’s AYUSH ministry said.

The number of yoga trainers in the country has increased 30% in the past two years, according to ministry estimates.

Yoga has gradually become popular among Indians. More and more private companies are hiring yoga instructors in their offices realizing its holistic benefits– Ishwara N. Acharya, joint adviser (yoga), AYUSH ministry

“Yoga has gradually become popular among Indians. More and more private companies are hiring yoga instructors in their offices realizing its holistic benefits. The government is also planning to create around 10,000 vacancies for yoga trainers in coming years,” said Ishwara N. Acharya, joint adviser (yoga) in the AYUSH ministry said.

“Recently, Haryana government has announced 1,000 vacancies in the state. We have written to all other states to identify the institutions where there is a need of certified yoga trainers. Before 2015, there was no certification for yoga trainers but we now provide them accreditation through Quality Council of India (QCI) to ensure quality of the traditional practice,” said Acharya.

QCI has designed a scheme for voluntary certification of yoga professionals by adopting principles and requirements laid down in international standards. QCI also enables the government to hire certified yoga trainers in its institutions.

“More and more people are willing to take up the traditional practice as a profession. We have recently facilitated the hiring of yoga trainers in the Haryana government. We are also certifying yoga schools in the country. We have over 30 applications from yoga schools for certification on the parameters of infrastructure and quality. Government yoga schools are also improving gradually,” said Manish Pande, joint director, QCI.

AYUSH ministry’s wing Central Council for Research in Yoga and Naturopathy (CCRYN) is actively engaged in research activities regarding yoga and its efficacy on various diseases. An AYUSH ministry yoga protocol document claims that a small sampling of research shows that yoga is beneficial for physical fitness, musculo-skeletal functioning and cardio-vascular health. It claims yoga is beneficial in the management of diabetes, respiratory disorders, hypertension, hypotension and many lifestyle-related disorders. Also, yoga helps reduce depression, fatigue, anxiety disorders and stress and it also regulates menopausal symptoms.

“Popularity of yoga can be seen with an overwhelming response on International Yoga Day on Wednesday. Over 51,000 people took part in yoga celebrations in Lucknow. There are many youth who want to adopt the practice as profession but they don’t have jobs. Youth will be attracted towards the profession if they see job opportunities in the area,” Acharya said.

Recently, Shripad Naik, minister of state in the AYUSH ministry, claimed that CCRYN is conducting a mega multi-centric research study on efficacy of yoga on diabetes in which around 250,000 people have been screened and the preliminary results of this research study are very encouraging. The minister also said treatments in modern medical hospitals are becoming expensive; so, yoga is making new inroads.

[“Source-livemint”]

A few minutes of light exercise, rather than a sweaty gym workout, is all that is needed to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, study suggests

Even small amounts of physical activity can offer health benefits that protect against diabetesEven small amounts of physical activity can offer health benefits that protect against diabetes, new research suggests.

A new study found that even a little exercise wards off insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes which can result from a high-fat diet.

Insulin resistance occurs when the cells of the body stop responding to insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels in the body.

Exercise can prevent insulin resistance by prompting the body to remove damaged cells and enhancing the quality of mitochondria, the cell’s energy powerhouses.

Type 2 diabetes affects 4.5 million people living in the UK and 29 million people in the US.

Even small amounts of physical activity can offer health benefits that protect against diabetes

The study also casts doubt on the previously held view that increasing the quantity of mitochondria could help fix some consequences of a high fat diet, including insulin resistance.

The researchers found that the benefits from physical activity were not affected by the quantity of mitochondria.

Lead researcher Megan Rosa-Caldwell, a doctoral student at the University of Arkansas, found that mice genetically engineered to have higher quantity of mitochondria were not more protected against high-fat diet induced insulin resistance.

How was the research conducted?

The researchers fed all the mice in the study a Western diet high in fat.

The genetically engineered and control mice were further divided into a group that was allowed to exercise, and a sedentary group.

Their results showed that physical activity, regardless of the amount of mitochondria, offered similar health benefits against insulin resistance.

Even a little exercise wards off insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes which can result from a high-fat diet

Study found even a little exercise wards off insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes

The researchers said that it appears that exercise’s ability to help remove damaged cells and enhance the quality of the mitochondria may be more effective for preventing insulin resistance.

But they said these aspects need to be further tested.

Exercise offers ‘the greatest protection’

Ms Rosa-Caldwell said that with rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes continuing to increase, understanding the cellular processes that help or hurt insulin resistance can help doctors better tailor effective preventative measures such as exercise.

She added: ‘For now, physical activity is the greatest protection, but further research may enable us to prevent and treat insulin resistance, and subsequent diabetes, more effectively.’

The research was published in the journal Experimental Physiology.

[“Source-ndtv”]

 

Drug companies reveal info on gifts to doctors

Image result for Drug companies reveal info on gifts to doctors

Several big-name drug companies in Canada have begun listing how much money they pay out to doctors, hospitals and health care groups, amid concerns that patients have been kept in the dark about the financial ties between their physicians and the pharmaceutical industry.

Ten large drug companies are releasing information on their websites, listing the millions of dollars of payments made to health-care professionals and organizations, such as hospitals and doctor groups. They have also listed payments made to doctors to cover their travel expenses to international meetings.

The participating companies include:

White prescription pills
  • GlaxoSmithKline
  • Amgen
  • Bristol-Myers Squibb
  • Gilead
  • Eli Lilly
  • Merck
  • Novartis
  • Purdue
  • Roche
  • AbbVie Corp.

GSK Canada (GlaxoSmithKline), which spearheaded the voluntary disclosure plan, revealed it paid a little more than $2 million to health care providers and organizations in 2016

Merck Canada revealed it paid more than $7 million for health care professional services, and another $2 million to patient groups and health organizations. Roche Canada offered more than $8 million in payments to doctors and health organization groups.

In all, the 10 companies offered more than $48 million in payments in 2016, though not all companies included figures for the entire year.

The 10 drug companies announced in late March, through the industry group Innovative Medicines Canada, that they would begin releasing the numbers, saying they were committed to “enhancing trust by disclosing the payment voluntarily.”

But many prominent pharmaceutical company observers say the move is little more than a public relations gesture and doesn’t go far enough to inform Canadians about the influence drug companies have on doctors.

For example, the companies are only listing their overall payments to health care professionals — not how much they paid to individual doctors, as is now required in the United States.

The Physician Payments Sunshine Act in the U.S. compels companies to divulge all payments to doctors of $10 or more. Britain, France and Denmark have similar “sunshine” legislation. In the U.S. patients can even access an interactive database created by ProPublica, called “Dollars for Docs,” that lists which doctors and hospitals receive the most payments from drug companies.

Several Canadian physicians want to see that kind of transparency in this country. They’ve formed a group, called “Open Pharma,” that calls on governments to compel drug companies to disclose all payments made to individual doctors.

Dr. Joel Lexchin is a member of Open Pharma and recently wrote a book called “Doctors in Denial: Why Big Pharma and the Canadian medical profession are too close for comfort”.

He calls the disclosure initiative a “very minor baby step” that offers Canadian patients an incomplete picture of the payments issue.

He would rather see listing of all payments to specific doctors or organizations but suspects drug companies are reticent to reveal how much they spend on individual doctors

Lexchin says his main concern is the research showing that doctors are influenced – consciously or not – when they receive gifts or payments from drug companies.

“What we know from research done in the U.S. is that even small amounts of money or gifts are associated with changes in prescribing behaviour,” he told CTV News.

He says doctors often feel obliged to repay drug companies for gifts and that repayment sometimes takes the form of prescribing products they might not have otherwise thought of before their interactions with the drug companies.

“Money creates conflicts of interest,” he said.

Lexchin has other reservations. He notes that the 10 drug companies taking part in the voluntary disclosure represent less than half the membership of the industry group.

He also worries that, because the initiative is voluntary, “companies that disclose payments this year may not do so again next year.”

[“Source-ndtv”]