‘My relationship break-up triggered my hair loss’

Image result for ‘My relationship break-up triggered my hair loss’“When I went to university, I’d not long broken up with a boyfriend of three-and-a-half years. Then, when I met James* in the first few weeks of Freshers’, I fell for him quickly. We soon started a relationship and didn’t look back.

It was so nice to have someone there with me throughout my university experience; to share it all together. We cared about each other and about one another’s work, so when James suggested we should have a break after a year and a half together, I was gutted. He said he wasn’t sure how he was feeling anymore and that he wanted two weeks apart to work it out. When the break only lasted a week, I was relieved – he decided he’d made a big mistake and that he still wanted to be with me. In hindsight, though, that was obviously the start of him becoming much less invested in the relationship than I was.

One day, after having been back together for a while, I looked at him and said something along the lines of, “I think you might be the one.” Instead of saying it back, he just froze. When a few tense moments had passed and he said, “I’m not sure”, I realised the relationship was over. It was never going to go back to how it had been before.

‘My relationship break-up triggered my hair loss’

James didn’t actually break up with me until some weeks later, when he’d left uni to go home for the summer. We spent an excruciatingly long three-hour phone conversation dodging the issue until I finally told him: “If you need to say something, just say it”. We were finished, and I was heartbroken.

For me, it was like the whole bubble of university had burst along with everything in it. I crashed; it completely knocked me. I’d fallen for James so fast and then all of a sudden I didn’t have him anymore. I felt so lost.

Another heartbreak

Just weeks after James and I broke up, I received a phone call from one of my university friends. A course-mate of ours, Fran*, had gone to Ireland with some other friends from university for the summer, and had been travelling in a car down a notoriously dangerous road when they had a head-on collision with another vehicle. Fran had died, and I didn’t know how to feel. I remember taking in the information but then instantly focusing on calming down my friend, who was in floods of tears by this point. Fran and I hadn’t been particularly close, but just before the summer break we’d worked on a dance group piece together for one of our modules, so we’d spent a lot of condensed time together. It was a horrible feeling to think that she wasn’t in the world anymore.

September came around, and after everything that had happened before and during the summer, I just wanted to put my head down and get through my final year at university. Things weren’t going to be the same and I felt down about it, but I’d got this far and I wasn’t going to quit now.

When I went home a few weeks into the term, however, my mum spotted that I had very little hair behind my ears. I hadn’t noticed it at all, but when I went back to uni I saw a doctor about it just in case. She told me it wasn’t severe enough to refer me to a dermatologist, so I went away and tried to forget about it.

The diagnosis

‘My relationship break up triggered my hair loss’
Sophie with her mum

COURTESY OF AUTHOR

Christmas came and went, but by this point it had become almost impossible not to notice I was losing my hair; by the time I went back to university in the January I had hardly any left, and a referral to the dermatologist revealed I had alopecia. I didn’t know much about it, and the information was very limited, but when they told me I’d lost too much hair to be eligible for any treatment, it was very hard to deal with. When doctors told me it was likely stress-related, that was even more difficult to process. I couldn’t help but feel like it was partly triggered by everything that had happened over the past year. I’d lost James, I’d lost Fran and now I had lost my hair, too.

When my hair got down to the last few wisps, I went to the hairdressers with a friend to get it shaved off. That in itself was a relief, but it was also a really sad moment because it made it all so definite. I remember thinking then that this was potentially what life was going to be like from now on, so I had to decide if I was going to hate every second of it or if I was going to try to embrace it as much as I could. I tried to embrace it, but it wasn’t easy at times.

Soon, it wasn’t just the hair on my head that had fallen out. My eyebrows had gone, along with my eyelashes, leg hair, arm hair, pubic hair, everywhere. I felt like I looked like an alien.

Moving on

In the four years since my hair first fell out, I’ve had good days and I’ve had bad days. I had my eyebrows tattooed on, which made a massive difference, and I have an Intralace Free Wear System (similar to a wig, but different because it can be worn 24/7 and treated like completely normal hair) from Lucinda Ellery which is so good because you wouldn’t know it’s not my own hair. But on some days it feels like too much of an effort and I can’t be bothered with it; before, I had really long blonde hair and I didn’t really need to think about it much, but putting the free wear system on sometimes takes a lot of effort.

I’ve had some ask me whether I’ve got cancer
COURTESY OF AUTHOR

On those days, I don’t wear it and I’ve had all sorts of comments from people I don’t know; I’ve had some ask me whether I’ve got cancer, and others asking if it’s a fashion statement. I just tell them I’ve got alopecia and explain it’s the body rejecting the hairs because it thinks they’re foreign. Other times, I don’t feel strong enough to handle people staring at me, so I put my free wear system on.

Dating isn’t easy, either. I’ve tried out Tinder, and I try to be very honest so I put photos up of me with and without my false hair on, but I’ve had some dodgy comments from guys. One said to me, “I can’t imagine a girl with no hair giving me a blow job.” I was shocked and angry, so I just replied, “well, you’re never going to know.” Having hair is seen as a very feminine thing, it’s a very sexual thing, so I think it’s difficult for some men that I don’t have any. I can’t see a relationship happening any time soon. My confidence has been knocked a lot and there is that cliché that if you don’t love yourself, then how is anyone else going to love you?

“Losing my hair also feels like I’ve lost my identity”

About 8 months ago, my hair started to grow on my head again. It was looking quite hopeful and I was trying not to get excited, but then it all fell out again. Now, I actually think I would much prefer if my hair never grew back and I would just stay bald, because it’s heartbreaking for it to grow back and then to lose it again. I recently went to the Belgravia Centre in London where they told me the pattern my hair fell out in – starting behind my ears and then snaking across my head – indicates a very high possibility that the hair will never come back. It’s that uncertainty that’s the worst bit, so I’d rather just resign myself to it.

‘My relationship break-up triggered my hair loss’

For me, losing my hair also feels like I’ve lost my identity. I’m still working through it now, and I’ve had therapy because my self-confidence did crash massively. It’s changed how I perceive myself and how I fit into this world. But maybe this new identity I’m discovering for myself is the identity I should have always had. Maybe me without hair is just honestly who I’m meant to be as a person.

[“Source-cosmopolitan”]

You Asked: Am I Gaining Muscle Weight or Fat From My Workout?

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Apart from an iced latte here and a skipped workout there, you’ve been good about sticking to your new health regimen. So it’s frustrating to step on the scale and see your weight has hardly budged. Or worse, you’ve put on a few pounds.

But wait, doesn’t muscle weigh more than fat? You have added pushups to your workouts…

Unfortunately, the odds that you’ve added even a small amount of muscle, let alone a few pounds of the stuff, is highly unlikely, says Dr. Lawrence Cheskin, director of the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center. “Unless you’re actively body-building”—think hour-long, three-days-a-week weight room workouts—“it’s very hard to gain a pound or more of muscle.”

Even if you are hitting the weights regularly, you’re not going to gain muscle weight rapidly, especially in the beginning. “It’s going to take at least four to six weeks of consistent training to experience significant gains,” says Michele Olson, an adjunct professor of sports science at Huntingdon University. Unless you’re engaged in some Arnold-level lifting, the two or three pounds you’ve added aren’t muscle.

But that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s fat, either. “In the short term, almost any changes in body weight, either up or down, are going to be from fluid shifts,” Cheskin says.

Cut added salt from your diet, and you’ll lose a lot of retained water very quickly. Or, if you weigh yourself after a hard, sweaty workout but before you rehydrate, you’re likely to have dropped a few pounds. “That can be gratifying, but it’s not meaningful,” Cheskin says.

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A new exercise program could also cause you to retain some extra fluid. “When you start working out and you’re sweating, your body is smart, and it understands that its volume of fluid is not at the level it typically would be,” Olson says. In order to prevent dehydration, your body responds by storing extra water, which can cause your weight to increase by a few pounds. The same thing can happen as the summer temperatures tick up and your body adjusts to the added heat and increased rate of sweating. (Combine the onset of summer with a new, intense workout schedule, and you can expect to add at least a few pounds due to water retention.)

On the other hand, you may drop a few pounds when fall temperatures arrive or you quit exercising. “If you’ve been working out a lot and you suddenly stop, I guarantee you will lose some water weight,” Olson says.

MORE: The TIME Guide To Exercise

All of these short-term factors help explain why most exercise physiologists and weight-loss counselors tell people not to get too hung up on the number on the scale. Your body weight is not a static measure or one composed solely of your proportion of fat to muscle. It’s going to slide up and down based on a lot of variables that don’t have much to do with your health.

That doesn’t mean you should trash your bathroom scale; some researchsuggests that overweight adults who weigh themselves regularly are more likely to stick with the diet and exercise routines that help them shed pounds.

But you’re better off weighing yourself just once or twice a week—first thing in the morning, after you pee but before you eat—and keeping track of how your weight shifts over a period of several weeks or months. The long-term pattern of weight gain or loss is a better indicator of how you’re doing. “Especially if you get upset by those day-to-day fluctuations, it’s better not to torture yourself,” Cheskin says.

The best way to keep tabs on your body weight has nothing to do with scales. “Just ask yourself if your clothes are fitting you better or looser, or if you have more energy, or if you feel healthier,” Olson says.

If you answer yes to these questions, whatever you’re doing is working.

[“Source-time”]

I went on the Silicon Valley diet craze that encourages butter and bacon for 2 months – and it vastly improved my life

Image result for I went on the Silicon Valley diet craze that encourages butter and bacon for 2 months - and it vastly improved my lifeA diet that goes against conventional wisdom on healthy eating is gaining momentum among Silicon Valley tech workers. And it involves eating a lot of fat.

The ketogenic (or “keto”) diet – which first became popular in the 1920s as a treatment for epilepsy and diabetes – limits carbohydrates to no more than 50 grams a day, which is the rough equivalent of a plain bagel or a cup of white rice. By comparison, dietary guidelines laid out by the USDA recommend consuming between 225 and 325 grams of carbs a day.

On the keto diet, the body goes into starvation mode and taps its own fat stores for fuel. Studies suggest the low-carb, high-fat diet may promote weight loss , dull hunger , and stave off age-related diseases. More research is needed on its long-term effects, especially in healthy people.

An increasing number of health nuts – from internet entrepreneur Kevin Rose tp podcaster Tim Ferriss – swear by the keto diet. I spent the last two months eating bacon, butter, and avocado to see why the keto movement is so popular.

[“Source-businessinsider”]

 

I Tried A Diet And Fitness Plan Based On My DNA And Couldn’t Believe The Results

 My name is Daysha, and I have always struggled with my weight.

Growing up, my weight fluctuated a lot. At one point in my life, I developed disordered eating habits. After recovering and practicing a lot of self-love, I found the problem then became that I never saw the same results that I did when I was starving myself.

It’s not that I don’t enjoy working out and eating healthy, because I do.

I love cooking healthy meals and I dance four to five times per week. I have always been frustrated with why it's so hard for me to lose weight. I tried all sorts of methods to lose weight and get fit, including a raw vegan diet, Weight Watchers, seeing a dietitian, doing a soup cleanse, P90X, and even getting a personal trainer. Nothing seemed to work for me.

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I love cooking healthy meals and I dance four to five times per week. I have always been frustrated with why it’s so hard for me to lose weight. I tried all sorts of methods to lose weight and get fit, including a raw vegan diet, Weight Watchers, seeing a dietitian, doing a soup cleanse, P90X, and even getting a personal trainer. Nothing seemed to work for me.

I started to believe that maybe it’s just my genetics.

Not ever seeing results discouraged me so much to the point that I wanted to just give up. It turned into a continuous cycle of embarking on a new diet or fitness plan, not seeing any real change after a few months, and then just giving up again.

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Not ever seeing results discouraged me so much to the point that I wanted to just give up. It turned into a continuous cycle of embarking on a new diet or fitness plan, not seeing any real change after a few months, and then just giving up again.

Then I found out about this thing called FitnessGenes and took a DNA test.

FitnessGenes is a genetic testing company that develops personalized fitness and nutrition plans based on an individual's DNA. I met with Dr. Dan Reardon, the CEO/cofounder, and took a DNA test. The results took one month to process. When I finally got them back, I was shocked.

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FitnessGenes is a genetic testing company that develops personalized fitness and nutrition plans based on an individual’s DNA. I met with Dr. Dan Reardon, the CEO/cofounder, and took a DNA test. The results took one month to process. When I finally got them back, I was shocked.

I sat down with Dr. Dan to learn more about my genetics and how my body works. Here’s what I learned:

1. My suspicion was correct. Genetically, I do have a slower metabolism. Dr. Dan described this in scientific terms as an "efficient metabolism," meaning that I store energy more than someone with a fast or "inefficient metabolism." 2. I also have a gene variation for the FTO gene that is linked to a hormone called ghrelin, which controls hunger. My gene variation implies that I am someone who becomes hungry very easily, therefore creating a higher risk of overeating. Dan said that eating small, frequent meals throughout the day to control hunger would be important. 3. I also have a gene variation in the APOA2 gene, indicating that I am sensitive to saturated fats, meaning that it sticks to me more easily! I asked Dr. Dan what foods have saturated fats and he said things like animal products, butter, dairy products, palm oil, and coconut oil. Coconut oil?! I ate so much coconut oil because of how often it's promoted as a healthy oil. No wonder I was having trouble.4. I am someone who would benefit from working out later in the day because my CLOCK gene variations imply that I am a night owl. This made perfect sense because I am definitely not a morning person.5. I am someone who responds well to "high-volume training," meaning high sets and reps of weight training. I always thought that lots of cardio would be the key to losing weight. It turns out that it was going to take a lot of strength training. Dan said that the more muscle I built, the more fat I would burn. 6. I am someone who does not switch from burning carbohydrates to burning fat easily. This would mean that I would need to be eating the right balance of macronutrients: carbs, protein and fat.7. Dan also said that I have a gene variation that indicates I metabolize caffeine slowly. This means that I would benefit by having a cup of green tea about 30 minutes prior to a workout for optimal energy.

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1. My suspicion was correct. Genetically, I do have a slower metabolism. Dr. Dan described this in scientific terms as an “efficient metabolism,” meaning that I store energy more than someone with a fast or “inefficient metabolism.”

2. I also have a gene variation for the FTO gene that is linked to a hormone called ghrelin, which controls hunger. My gene variation implies that I am someone who becomes hungry very easily, therefore creating a higher risk of overeating. Dan said that eating small, frequent meals throughout the day to control hunger would be important.

3. I also have a gene variation in the APOA2 gene, indicating that I am sensitive to saturated fats, meaning that it sticks to me more easily! I asked Dr. Dan what foods have saturated fats and he said things like animal products, butter, dairy products, palm oil, and coconut oil. Coconut oil?! I ate so much coconut oil because of how often it’s promoted as a healthy oil. No wonder I was having trouble.

4. I am someone who would benefit from working out later in the day because my CLOCK gene variations imply that I am a night owl. This made perfect sense because I am definitely not a morning person.

5. I am someone who responds well to “high-volume training,” meaning high sets and reps of weight training. I always thought that lots of cardio would be the key to losing weight. It turns out that it was going to take a lot of strength training. Dan said that the more muscle I built, the more fat I would burn.

6. I am someone who does not switch from burning carbohydrates to burning fat easily. This would mean that I would need to be eating the right balance of macronutrients: carbs, protein and fat.

7. Dan also said that I have a gene variation that indicates I metabolize caffeine slowly. This means that I would benefit by having a cup of green tea about 30 minutes prior to a workout for optimal energy.

Instead of counting calories, I tracked my macronutrients.

Dan said it would be important to have 1,700–1,900 calories maximum per day, since I am someone with a slow metabolism. However, instead of counting calories, which had put me in a negative headspace in the past, I tracked my macronutrients every day using this whiteboard. Macronutrient breakdown Carbohydrates: 40% Protein: 30% Fat: 30% (less than 8% coming from saturated fats, and the main source coming from monounsaturated fats. This would include foods such as almonds, olive oil, avocado, sesame oil, and canola oil.)

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Dan said it would be important to have 1,700–1,900 calories maximum per day, since I am someone with a slow metabolism. However, instead of counting calories, which had put me in a negative headspace in the past, I tracked my macronutrients every day using this whiteboard.

Macronutrient breakdown

Carbohydrates: 40%

Protein: 30%

Fat: 30% (less than 8% coming from saturated fats, and the main source coming from monounsaturated fats. This would include foods such as almonds, olive oil, avocado, sesame oil, and canola oil.)

I learned how to create meals that were delicious and healthy for my body.

The 30-day plan was easy to follow, but it did take a lot of hard work.

I worked out with Dan three to four times per week doing strength training and high-intensity interval training (HIIT). I had two active recovery days and also took a brisk walk every morning. Yes, there were times when I wanted to quit, but I felt stronger and stronger as the time went by. It motivated me even more to continue.

BuzzFeed Video

I worked out with Dan three to four times per week doing strength training and high-intensity interval training (HIIT). I had two active recovery days and also took a brisk walk every morning. Yes, there were times when I wanted to quit, but I felt stronger and stronger as the time went by. It motivated me even more to continue.

I couldn’t have done it without a strong support system.

I was lucky enough to have friends who were invested in me and seeing me succeed. They were even willing to work out with me!

After 30 days, I could not believe the results!

I didn't weigh myself the entire 30 days, because I didn't want to be discouraged by the numbers. Instead, I focused on how I was feeling. I had more energy than I have ever had before! In the end, it really wasn't about the numbers for me. I just wanted to be the healthiest, happiest version of myself.

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I didn’t weigh myself the entire 30 days, because I didn’t want to be discouraged by the numbers. Instead, I focused on how I was feeling. I had more energy than I have ever had before! In the end, it really wasn’t about the numbers for me. I just wanted to be the healthiest, happiest version of myself.

Although I lost weight and body fat, it was never about the numbers for me. I came out of this experience a different person on the inside, and that is what matters to me the most.

This experience allowed me to trust my body more than I ever have. I realized that I was always caught in this mindset that I was somehow "broken," and that nothing would ever work for me. In reality, I just needed to learn more about my body and how I function as an individual. We live in a culture where everyone is trying to tell you what's healthy, and this gave me the peace of mind to know what's actually healthy for my own body. This is only the beginning for me!

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This experience allowed me to trust my body more than I ever have. I realized that I was always caught in this mindset that I was somehow “broken,” and that nothing would ever work for me. In reality, I just needed to learn more about my body and how I function as an individual. We live in a culture where everyone is trying to tell you what’s healthy, and this gave me the peace of mind to know what’s actually healthy for my own body. This is only the beginning for me!

FitnessGenes is offering a 20% discount for BuzzFeed users using code BUZZFEED at checkout. Follow this link.

Special thanks to Granite Gym and Sanctuary Fitness LA for use of their facilities.

[“Source-buzzfeed”]

AI beating humans? Not in my lifetime, says Google’s cloud chief

161115 greene code 2
Diane Greene, senior vice president of Google, speaks at the Code Enterprise conference in San Francisco on November 15, 2016. Credit: Martyn Williams

The head of Google’s cloud business says she doesn’t expect machine intelligence to exceed that of humans during her lifetime, despite recent rapid progress that has surprised many.

Diane Greene, who turns 61 this year, said that while researchers are making strides in programming intelligence into computers, there’s still a long way to go.

“There is a lot that machine learning doesnt do that humans can do really, really well,” she said on Tuesday at the Code Enterprise conference in San Francisco.

Her remarks came hours after Google said Greene’s division had hired two leading machine learning and artificial intelligence experts:Fei-Fei Li, who was director of AI at Stanford University, and Jia Li, who headed up research at Snap, the operator of SnapChat.

“Nobody expected some of the advances we are seeing as quickly as were seeing them,” she said, “but, the singularity i dont see it in my sentient lifetime.”

Greene had been asked to evaluate, on a scale from one to ten, how close the industry was to “the singularity” — the moment, forecast by technologist Ray Kurzweil, when machine intelligence would go beyond that of humans.

Greene never got around to putting a number on the current state of research. But she did acknowledge that some people would lose their jobs as machine learning became more useful.

“I think its really incumbent on us to get the education out there to make sure everyone is digitally literate, because thats where the divide is, and because if youre digitally literate, youre going to have jobs,” she said.

At least for now, there aren’t enough qualified people in the job market for the number of research jobs available, but that situation’s unlikely to last, so Silicon Valley is being asked tough questions about where this push into machine intelligence will take the world.

Greene said the industry was taking the matter seriously but offered only small efforts to solve it, like supplying Chromebooks to schools.

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source”cnbc”

‘I told my father not spend money on my birthday and instead send it to the PM’: 7-year-old girl from MP

Seven-year-old donates her money to support girl-child education

Education is a service, which should be free of cost, and government is trying hard to bring this in effect. Aryadhya Rawal, a seven-year-old girl from a Jhabua district of Madhya Pradesh, has been kind enough to donate her birthday celebration amount of Rs 21, 000 for girl child education.

Aryadhya was given a sum of Rs 21,000 so as to celebrate her birthday, however she requested her father to send a demand draft of Rs 21,000 to the Prime Minister.

Aryadhya knows that PM is making back-breaking efforts to make people aware about girl-child education and is launching a number of schemes to support the same, so she also did her bit towards his effort.
What inspired this little angel?

“I see many girls in my colony not studying as their parents are poor. I decided to give the money to the Prime Minister, who will definitely spend it to educate children who are deprived,” said Aradhya, who celebrated her birthday on Tuesday.

“I told my father not spend money on my birthday and instead send it to the PM,” she told Hindustan Times.

source”gsmarena”