Nearly 1/2 of breast cancer patients have severe treatment side effects, 1 in 20 Indians suffers from depression

Health weekly roundupHealth weekly roundup
This week was packed with some very shocking yet important health news. To ensure that you don’t miss any, we bring you a weekly roundup. Here is this week’s aggregation of the latest news stories on health, fitness and diet.

Insomnia may triple the risk of asthma: Study

Asthma affects approximately 300 million people worldwide, with major risk factors including smoking, obesity and air pollution.

Mother’s cervical bacteria may help prevent premature birth

The presence of bacteria in a woman’s vagina and cervix may either increase the risk of premature birth or have a protective effect against it, researchers say.

Attention parents! Cooking in those aluminium pans may reduce your kid’s IQ

The findings published in journal Science of the Total Environment, indicate that cadmium is neurotoxic in children and causes kidney damage which is linked to cardiovascular deaths and is carcinogenic.

Eating celery, broccoli can improve treatment of breast cancer

The findings indicate that Luteolin, a naturally occurring, non-toxic plant compound that has been proven effective against several types of cancer.

‘Anxiety, depression may up risk of death from cancers’

Higher levels of anxiety and depression may increase the risk of death from certain cancers, scientists have warned.

Nearly half of breast cancer patients have severe treatment side effects

Many women being treated for breast cancer suffer from severe treatment side effects even when they don’t receive chemotherapy, a recent study suggests.

One in every 20 Indians suffers from depression

Indians popped in more anti-depressants than ever before in 2016, indicating perhaps that they are now more open to the idea of seeking help for mental health problems.

Wrongly diagnosed foot injury may cause arthritis, chronic pain

The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Review has highlighted the importance of additional imaging, second opinions for accurate diagnosis and treatment.

Only 1% of R&D funds spent for HIV, TB and malaria: WHO

Investments in health research and development (R&D) are poorly aligned with global public health needs, the World Health Organisation said.

Healthy food may benefit people with HIV, diabetes: Study

Mediterranean diet loaded with fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins and healthy fats for six months may benefit people with HIV and Type 2 diabetes.

Cheap breath test may detect stomach, oesophageal cancers

Scientists have developed a cheap and non-invasive test that can measure the levels of five chemicals in the breath to detect cancers of the oesophagus and stomach with 85 per cent accuracy.

source”cnbc”

Nearly 1/2 of breast cancer patients have severe treatment side effects, 1 in 20 Indians suffers from depression

Health weekly roundupHealth weekly roundup

This week was packed with some very shocking yet important health news. To ensure that you don’t miss any, we bring you a weekly roundup. Here is this week’s aggregation of the latest news stories on health, fitness and diet.

Insomnia may triple the risk of asthma: Study

Asthma affects approximately 300 million people worldwide, with major risk factors including smoking, obesity and air pollution.

Mother’s cervical bacteria may help prevent premature birth

The presence of bacteria in a woman’s vagina and cervix may either increase the risk of premature birth or have a protective effect against it, researchers say.

Attention parents! Cooking in those aluminium pans may reduce your kid’s IQ

The findings published in journal Science of the Total Environment, indicate that cadmium is neurotoxic in children and causes kidney damage which is linked to cardiovascular deaths and is carcinogenic.

Eating celery, broccoli can improve treatment of breast cancer

The findings indicate that Luteolin, a naturally occurring, non-toxic plant compound that has been proven effective against several types of cancer.

‘Anxiety, depression may up risk of death from cancers’

Higher levels of anxiety and depression may increase the risk of death from certain cancers, scientists have warned.

Nearly half of breast cancer patients have severe treatment side effects

Many women being treated for breast cancer suffer from severe treatment side effects even when they don’t receive chemotherapy, a recent study suggests.

One in every 20 Indians suffers from depression

Indians popped in more anti-depressants than ever before in 2016, indicating perhaps that they are now more open to the idea of seeking help for mental health problems.

Wrongly diagnosed foot injury may cause arthritis, chronic pain

The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Review has highlighted the importance of additional imaging, second opinions for accurate diagnosis and treatment.

Only 1% of R&D funds spent for HIV, TB and malaria: WHO

Investments in health research and development (R&D) are poorly aligned with global public health needs, the World Health Organisation said.

Healthy food may benefit people with HIV, diabetes: Study

Mediterranean diet loaded with fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins and healthy fats for six months may benefit people with HIV and Type 2 diabetes.

Cheap breath test may detect stomach, oesophageal cancers

Scientists have developed a cheap and non-invasive test that can measure the levels of five chemicals in the breath to detect cancers of the oesophagus and stomach with 85 per cent accuracy.

Protein can cut progression of both inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer: Study

A new study finds that altering the shape of a protein can significantly reduce the progression of inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer.

Children exposed to complications at birth are at risk of autism, study finds

A study by Kaiser Permanente found that children who were exposed to complications shortly before or during birth, including birth asphyxia and preeclampsia, were more likely to develop autism spectrum disorder.

source”cnbc”

One in every 20 Indians suffers from depression

One in every 20 Indians suffers from depression (Thinkstock photos/Getty Images)One in every 20 Indians suffers from depression (Thinkstock photos/Getty Images)
Indians popped in more anti-depressants than ever before in 2016, indicating perhaps that they are now more open to the idea of seeking help for mental health problems.

Around 10.6 lakh more prescriptions for anti-depressants were written in 2016 in comparison to 2015, shows data collated by health information agencies. While 3.35 crore prescriptions (for newly diagnosed patients) were written in 2015, doctors wrote 3.46 crore new prescriptions in 2016.

In fact, the number of prescriptions for anti-depressants written out by psychiatrists in 2016 represented a 14% increase from the previous year. Psychiatrists treat patients with major depressive disorders while doctors hailing from multiple specialties treat patients with mild depression or disease-related depression.

Depression, though widely spread in India, is rarely given importance in the public health system, which is burdened by infectious diseases such as tuberculosis and dengue as well as non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. In October 2016, the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS) in Bengaluru released a mental health survey that said one in every 20 Indians suffered from some form of depression. The prevalence of depression across the world has increased to such an extent that it’s the theme for the World Health Organisation’s World Health Day on April 7.

When contacted, NIMHANS director Dr B N Gangadhar said the increase in the number of prescriptions could also be an indication of the increasing number of psychiatrists in India. “There is no doubt that people are more open than before to seek help for depression, but a 14% rise in prescriptions could also mean there are more psychiatrists today than before,” Dr Gangadhar said, adding that roughly 360 new psychiatrists graduate annually .

Mumbai-based psychiatrist Dr Harish Shetty said there has been a tremendous increase in awareness about mental health. “There is a 100% increase in the number of patients coming to psychiatrists in the last couple of years,” he said, adding that the increase could be the tip of the iceberg.

Goa-based Dr Vikram Patel, who is attached to the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said antidepressants have low penetration in India. “If there is an increase, it is not surprising as more people seek help these days. This doesn’t mean there is an increase in the incidence of depression, but there is an increase in awareness,” he said. A recent survey by a pharma major recently listed family pressure, relationship issues as well as biological changes as the leading causes of depression among Indians.Dr Shetty pinpointed the “rapid shifts taking place in India” in the fields of finance, education, workplace, family , among others, as the major cause for depression. “People try to cramp in a century of living within a decade. The brain is being challenged beyond its potential, leading to an increase in depression rates. It is like an orchestra being disrupted,” said Dr Shetty .

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Depression is closely linked to social determinants.”Some may suffer from depression due to economic difficulties such as debt while women may suffer due to mental difficulties such as domestic violence,” said Dr Patel.

source”cnbc”

Indians Consume Over Twice The Salt Recommended: Study

Indians Consume Over Twice The Salt Recommended: Study

NEW DELHI: Indians are consuming more than double the recommended amount of salt by WHO in their diets, thus putting themselves at increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and early deaths, a study claimed today.

The study conducted by George Institute for Global Health said the average daily salt intake of Indians above 19 years, was found to be 10.98 grams against the WHO recommendation of 5 grams per day.

It said the salt consumption was higher in southern and eastern states of India.

Tripura topped the list with an average daily salt intake of around 14 grams, almost three times the recommendation by World Health Organisation (WHO).

“Over the past 30 years, the average Indian diet has been transformed. The Indians are eating less pulses, fruits and vegetables and more processed and fast food.

“As a result, their diets are now full of salt, sugar and harmful fats which are driving up rates of high blood pressure, obesity and cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks and strokes,” Claire Johnson, lead author of the study said.

With salt being a major contributing factor to high blood pressure, a leading cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the study highlights the need for urgent action to reduce salt consumption in the country.

The study found that there was no difference in salt consumption between urban and rural areas, while it emphasised that urban population eat less processed foods, but they consume more salted pickled products.
CVD is the leading cause of mortality in India leading to some 2.3 million deaths each year, a quarter of which are attributed to high blood pressure, the WHO said.

By 2030, the number of people suffering from high blood pressure in India is set to nearly double to 213 million.

“The scale of the crisis facing India is hard to contemplate. We are talking about millions of people dying each year due to unhealthy diets and lifestyles,” said Johnson.

The George Institute for Global Health is at present working with the Centre for Chronic Disease Control (CCDC) and develop the evidence for a national salt reduction program.

Vivek Jha, Executive Director of the institute, said India has to ramp up its efforts to meet the WHO target of a 30 per cent reduction in salt consumption by 2025.

“We need a country wide educational program teaching people what to eat and how to reduce salt in their diets. It can be done but it needs investment. It needs to be made a priority given the rising levels of CVD and high blood pressure cases in India.

“We also need to work with the food industry and encourage them to reduce salt levels in processed foods,” he said.

source”cnbc”