Sex of the baby may play important role in would-be mother’s immunity

Sex of the baby may play important role in would-be mother's immunitySex of the baby may play important role in would-be mother’s immunity
A study reveals would-be mothers, carrying female fetuses may exhibit a heightened inflammatory response that can contribute to sickness-related symptoms, such as achiness and fatigue.

According to researchers, women, over the years, have claimed that body of a mother, carrying male and female baby, react differently.

The study, published in journal Brain, Behavior and Immunity, shows the sex of a baby is associated with pregnant women’s immune responses.

Inflammation is a critical part of the immune response involved in wound healing and responses to viruses, bacteria and chronic illnesses and excessive inflammation is stressful to the body and can contribute to sickness-related symptoms, such as achiness and fatigue.

Researchers from the Ohio State University’s wexner medical center in the US followed 80 pregnant women across the course of their pregnancy and examined whether women exhibited different levels of immune markers called cytokines based on fetal sex.

The analyses were conducted on levels of cytokines in the blood and levels produced by a sample of immune cells that were exposed to bacteria in the lab.

“While women didn’t exhibit differences in blood cytokine levels based on fetal sex, we did find that the immune cells of women carrying female fetuses produced more pro-inflammatory cytokines when exposed to bacteria,” said principal investigator of the study Amanda Mitchell.

“This means that women carrying female fetuses exhibited a heightened inflammatory response when their immune system was challenged, compared to women carrying male fetuses,” Mitchell explained.

Adding, “This research helps women and their obstetricians recognise that fetal sex is one factor that may impact how a woman’s body responds to everyday immune challenges and can lead to further research into how differences in immune function may affect how a women responds to different viruses, infections or chronic health conditions (such as asthma).”

source”cnbc”

Sleep deprivation leads to weakened immunity: Study

IANS | Jan 28, 2017, 04.25 PM IST

Sleep deprivation leads to weakened immunity: Study (Image Courtesy: Shutterstock)Sleep deprivation leads to weakened immunity: Study (Image Courtesy: Shutterstock)
People who are deprived of sleep regularly are likely to have a weak immune system, a study has found.

The findings showed that chronic short sleep shuts down programmes involved in immune response of circulating white blood cells.

Seven or more hours of sleep is recommended for optimal health, thus the immune system functions best when it gets enough sleep, the researchers said.

“The results are consistent with studies that show when sleep deprived people are given a vaccine, there is a lower antibody response and if you expose sleep deprived people to a rhinovirus they are more likely to get the virus,” said lead author Nathaniel Watson, University of Washington in Seattle.

For the study, published in the journal Sleep, the team took blood samples from 11 pairs of identical twins with different sleep patterns and discovered that the twin with shorter sleep duration had a depressed immune system, compared with his or her sibling.

They used identical twins because genetics account for 31 to 55 per cent of sleep duration and behaviour and environment accounts for the remainder.

“Modern society, with its control of light, omnipresent technology and countless competing interests for time, along with the zeitgeist de-emphasising sleep’s importance, has resulted in the widespread deprioritisation of sleep,” the researchers noted.

source”cnbc”