Yoga, beer mix at Happy Hour

Yoga, beer mix at Happy Hour

TRAVERSE CITY — Forget about raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens.

A group of enthusiasts have found a different mix of their favorite things at Happy Hour Yoga, held every other Friday under the water tower outside Earthen Ales in the Village at Grand Traverse Commons.

For $10, participants receive an hour of yoga instruction from Kelsea Erickson, followed by a pint of craft beer at Earthen Ales.

Erickson is an Experienced-Registered Yoga Teacher with 500 hours of certified training through the Yoga Alliance in Hatha yoga.

She teaches weekly at the Sleeping Bear Bay Club in Glen Arbor, does private instruction and trained in Rishikesh, India for a total of 12 weeks.

“It’s combining two of my favorite things that are on the totally opposite spectrum,” Erickson said. “I love beer, I love yoga and I love socializing so combining the two and having fun with it is a good thing. In the studio you teach your class and then everybody leaves right after, you don’t get that chance to talk with people.

“Having everybody come in, we do a class, we go have a beer afterwards and we can chit-chat and talk about whatever. It brings a lot more community feel to it.”

Sisters Victoria and Christina Dixon agreed that yoga and beer work well together.

Victoria Dixon has attended both Happy Hour Yoga sessions. The Traverse City woman found out about the June 23 debut class on Facebook.

“Beer and wine are very relaxing and my job is very stressful,” said Victoria Dixon, an operating room nurse at Munson Medical Center. “I like yoga and come to Earthen Ales often.”

“I love both beer and yoga,” added Christina Dixon, who was in town visiting her sister from Las Vegas. “They’re the top two on my favorites list.”

Nan Lewis of Interlochen did a beer and yoga event previously on Old Mission Peninsula held through the Jolly Pumpkin. She was at Happy Hour Yoga with her truck driver husband, Larry, who had the week off.

“It’s just something new to try and I have the opportunity to do it with my husband, something I didn’t have the opportunity to do before,” she said.

Andrew Kidwell-Bix, who co-owns Earthen Ales with his wife, Jamie, said Erickson had the idea for Happy Hour Yoga. It didn’t take much to sell them on the concept.

“She was just in, having a beer, talking about yoga and ways to unwind at the end of the week,” Andrew Kidwell-Bix said. “To me, there’s no better way to end the week with yoga and then sitting down and having a beer.”

The first Earthen Ales Happy Hour Yoga drew seven participants. The next drew four, faced with competition from the National Cherry Festival. Sessions will continue every other Friday outside Earthen Ales, with the next one scheduled from 5-6 p.m. on July 19. No advance registration is required.

“If we can get more people out more often, I’m always happy to use the sunshine in the summertime,” Erickson said. “There’s only so much time you can spend in Michigan doing outdoor yoga stuff. We want to get as much as we can in here.”

Participants are asked to bring a yoga mat or towel and “your thirsty self.” New Happy Hour Yoga participants have to sign a waiver, pay Erickson the fee and receive a “Na’ Ma Stay and Drink a Beer” voucher for a pint of their choice.

There are some in the fitness community that believe that beer after a strenuous workout is a good way to recover quickly.

“Beer definitely has a lot of good nutrients for you,” Erickson said. “I got done having a kid seven months ago and they said one of the best things for me to do for my milk production was to drink beer, which was very odd to me. So I looked into that a little bit. The yeast is really good for you and honestly, I feel better if I’ve earned drinking my beer.”

“If I feel like I did something first, I don’t feel quite so bad about drinking a beer later on.”

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An hour of moderate exercise a day enough to counter health risks from prolonged sitting

The health risks associated with sitting for eight or more hours a day — whether at work, home or commuting — can be eliminated with an hour or more of physical activity a day, according to a study from an international team of researchers.

Ever since a study back in 1953 discovered that London bus drivers were at greater risk of heart disease compared to bus conductors, scientists have found increasing evidence that lack of physical activity is a major risk factor for several diseases and for risk of early death. Recent estimates suggest that more than 5 million people die globally each year as a result of failing to meet recommended daily activity levels.

Studies in high-income countries have suggested that adults spend the majority of their waking hours sitting down. A typical day for many people is driving to work, sitting in an office, driving home and watching TV. Current physical activity guidelines recommend that adults do at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise per week.

In an analysis published today in The Lancet that draws together a number of existing studies, an international team of researchers asked the question: if an individual is active enough, can this reduce, or even eliminate, the increased risk of early death associated with sitting down?

In total the researchers analysed 16 studies, which included data from more than one million men and women. The team grouped individuals into four quartiles depending on their level of moderate intensity physical activity, ranging from less than 5 minutes per day in the bottom group to over 60 minutes in the top. Moderate intensity exercise was defined as equating to walking at 3.5 miles/hour or cycling at 10 miles/hour, for example.

The researchers found that 60 to 75 minutes of moderate intensity exercise per day were sufficient to eliminate the increased risk of early death associated with sitting for over eight hours per day. However, as many as three out of four people in the study failed to reach this level of daily activity.

The greatest risk of early death was for those individuals who were physically inactive, regardless of the amount of time sitting — they were between 28% and 59% more likely to die early compared with those who were in the most active quartile — a similar risk to that associated with smoking and obesity. In other words, lack of physical activity is a greater health risk than prolonged sitting.

“There has been a lot of concern about the health risks associated with today’s more sedentary lifestyles,” says Professor Ulf Ekelund from the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit at the University of Cambridge. “Our message is a positive one: it is possible to reduce — or even eliminate — these risks if we are active enough, even without having to take up sports or go to the gym.

“For many people who commute to work and have office-based jobs, there is no way to escape sitting for prolonged periods of time. For these people in particular, we cannot stress enough the importance of getting exercise, whether it’s getting out for a walk at lunchtime, going for a run in the morning or cycling to work. An hour of physical activity per day is the ideal, but if this is unmanageable, then at least doing some exercise each day can help reduce the risk.”

The researchers acknowledge that there are limitations to the data analysed, which mainly came from participants aged 45 years and older and living in western Europe, the US and Australia. However, they believe that the strengths of the analysis outweigh these limitations. Most importantly, the researchers asked all included studies to reanalyse their data in a harmonized manner, an approach that has never before been adopted for a study of this size and therefore also provides much more robust effect estimates compared with previous studies.

[“source -cncb”]

An hour of moderate exercise a day enough to counter health risks from prolonged sitting

The health risks associated with sitting for eight or more hours a day — whether at work, home or commuting — can be eliminated with an hour or more of physical activity a day, according to a study from an international team of researchers.

Ever since a study back in 1953 discovered that London bus drivers were at greater risk of heart disease compared to bus conductors, scientists have found increasing evidence that lack of physical activity is a major risk factor for several diseases and for risk of early death. Recent estimates suggest that more than 5 million people die globally each year as a result of failing to meet recommended daily activity levels.

Studies in high-income countries have suggested that adults spend the majority of their waking hours sitting down. A typical day for many people is driving to work, sitting in an office, driving home and watching TV. Current physical activity guidelines recommend that adults do at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise per week.

In an analysis published today in The Lancet that draws together a number of existing studies, an international team of researchers asked the question: if an individual is active enough, can this reduce, or even eliminate, the increased risk of early death associated with sitting down?

In total the researchers analysed 16 studies, which included data from more than one million men and women. The team grouped individuals into four quartiles depending on their level of moderate intensity physical activity, ranging from less than 5 minutes per day in the bottom group to over 60 minutes in the top. Moderate intensity exercise was defined as equating to walking at 3.5 miles/hour or cycling at 10 miles/hour, for example.

The researchers found that 60 to 75 minutes of moderate intensity exercise per day were sufficient to eliminate the increased risk of early death associated with sitting for over eight hours per day. However, as many as three out of four people in the study failed to reach this level of daily activity.

The greatest risk of early death was for those individuals who were physically inactive, regardless of the amount of time sitting — they were between 28% and 59% more likely to die early compared with those who were in the most active quartile — a similar risk to that associated with smoking and obesity. In other words, lack of physical activity is a greater health risk than prolonged sitting.

“There has been a lot of concern about the health risks associated with today’s more sedentary lifestyles,” says Professor Ulf Ekelund from the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit at the University of Cambridge. “Our message is a positive one: it is possible to reduce — or even eliminate — these risks if we are active enough, even without having to take up sports or go to the gym.

“For many people who commute to work and have office-based jobs, there is no way to escape sitting for prolonged periods of time. For these people in particular, we cannot stress enough the importance of getting exercise, whether it’s getting out for a walk at lunchtime, going for a run in the morning or cycling to work. An hour of physical activity per day is the ideal, but if this is unmanageable, then at least doing some exercise each day can help reduce the risk.”

The researchers acknowledge that there are limitations to the data analysed, which mainly came from participants aged 45 years and older and living in western Europe, the US and Australia. However, they believe that the strengths of the analysis outweigh these limitations. Most importantly, the researchers asked all included studies to reanalyse their data in a harmonized manner, an approach that has never before been adopted for a study of this size and therefore also provides much more robust effect estimates compared with previous studies.
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