Are You Having Excessive Hair Loss? Know the Causes

Are You Having Excessive Hair Loss? Know the Causes

Excessive hair loss may be due to many reasons

Losing hair is a natural occurrence and according to a New York based study, on an average, we lose at around 50-100 hair strands on regular basis. And this happens because your hair goes through its cycle where your hair re-grows when you lose them. However, if that cycle disturbs because of certain reasons, you should immediately get your Doctor’s appointment. While choosing a suitable hair shampoo and conditioner are essential to prevent excessive hair loss, there are certain physical and mental reasons which contribute to it. Losing hair also acts as an indicator of your overall health and therefore it is important to be careful about excessive hair loss. Hence, read further to know about the reasons which makes that happen.

1. Hormonal Changes

Imbalanced secretion of hormones in the body causes excessive hair loss. The reasons for this hormonal imbalance is manifold; they can be due to pregnancy, childbirth or the onset of menopause. According to health experts, thyroid problems also distorts hormonal levels.

2. Scalp Infections

Scalp infections like- Ringworm loosens your hair roots and often result in patchy scalp. An unhealthy scalp can cause inflammation that makes it difficult for hair to grow. Skin conditions that lead to hair loss include Seborrheic dermatitis (dandruff), psoriasis and fungal infections.

Seborrheic dermatitis causes the scalp to shed it skin which leads to greasy and yellowish scales on your shoulders or in your hair. It is possibly because of hormonal changes or excess oil in the skin.

3. Hair-Pulling Disorder

Hair-Pulling Disorder is also called trichotillomania which causes people to have an irresistible urge to pull out their hair- from scalp, eyebrows or other areas of the body. This unusual disorder leads to hair loss.

4. Hereditary Hair Loss

Genetic hair loss is known as androgenetic alopecia and according to the American Academy of Dermatology, it is one of the most common cause for hair loss. The gene can be inherited either from your mother or father. If not given timely medical attention, this leads to permanent hair loss.

5. Hyperthyroidism

When your body produces too little thyroid hormone, you are said to have hypothyroidism (or an under-active thyroid). Thyroid hormone is responsible for everything from your basal metabolic rate to the growth of your hair, skin and nails. But when you don’t have the right amount, you may notice changes in bodily functions.

6. Iron Deficiency

Women with heavy blood flow during menstruation or those who intake food with insufficient nutrient content, have unusual loss of hair. The excessive blood flow during periods, often lead to iron deficiency which obstructs the oxygen supply into your blood.

7. Excessive Styling

Too much styling and dyeing can harm your tresses. Heat and chemicals used in styling weakens your hair, causing it to break and fall out. It is, therefore, advisable to style your hair while being mindful of the kind and composition of the hair-color used.

[“Source-doctor.ndtv”]

Having last baby after 35 makes women sharper in old age

IANS | Nov 18, 2016, 05.20 PM IST

Having last baby after 35 makes women sharper in old age (Representative image)Having last baby after 35 makes women sharper in old age (Representative image)
Women have better brainpower after menopause if they had their last baby after age 35, says a study.

“Based on the findings, we would certainly not recommend that women wait until they’re 35 to close their family, but the study provides strong evidence that there is a positive association between later age at last pregnancy and late-life cognition,” said lead author Roksana Karim, Assistant Professor at Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California in the US.

This is the first study to investigate the association between age at last pregnancy, which can be a marker of a later surge of pregnancy-related hormones, and cognitive function in later life, Karim added.

The main hormones at play are estrogen and progesterone. In animal studies, estrogen has a beneficial impact on brain chemistry, function and structure; progesterone is linked with growth and development of brain tissue, Karim said.

An outpouring of estrogen and progesterone, especially in later life, appears to be beneficial, Karim noted.

The study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, included 830 women who, on average, were 60 years old.

Participants were given a series of tests that included assessments of verbal memory, psychomotor speed, attention and concentration, planning, visual perception, and memory.

The researchers found that postmenopausal women who had their last pregnancy after 35 had better verbal memory — remembering a list of words or retelling a story after some distraction.

The study found that other reproductive events were also important to later life cognition. More time between first and last period — longer reproductive life — proved valuable for executive function.

“Starting your period early means you have higher levels of the female sex hormone being produced by the ovaries,” Karim said.

“Girls are receiving the optimal levels early, so it’s possible that their brain structures are better developed compared to those who are exposed to estrogen levels associated with menstrual cycles at a later age,” Karim noted.

Stay updated on the go with Times of India News App. Click here to download it for your device.

source”cnbc”

Bitcoin,experts,are,having,a,spat,on,whether,it’s,a,currency,or,a,commodity

Mother nursing her newborn baby.
Credit: © Romanova Anna / Fotolia

A new study, which followed 180 pre-term infants from birth to age seven, found that babies who were fed more breast milk within the first 28 days of life had had larger volumes of certain regions of the brain at term equivalent and had better IQs, academic achievement, working memory, and motor function.

The findings were published online in The Journal of Pediatrics.

“Our data support current recommendations for using mother’s milk to feed preterm babies during their neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization. This is not only important for moms, but also for hospitals, employers, and friends and family members, so that they can provide the support that’s needed during this time when mothers are under stress and working so hard to produce milk for their babies,” says Mandy Brown Belfort, MD, a researcher and physician in the Department of Newborn Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and lead author.

Researchers studied infants born before 30 weeks gestation that were enrolled in the Victorian Infant Brain Studies cohort from 2001-2003. They determined the number of days that infants received breast milk as more than 50 percent of of their nutritional intake from birth to 28 days of life. Additionally, researchers examined data related to regional brain volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at each baby’s term equivalent age and at seven years old, and also looked at cognitive (IQ, reading, mathematics, attention, working memory, language, visual perception) and motor testing at age seven.

The findings show that, accross all babies, infants who received predominantly breast milk on more days during their NICU hospitalization had larger deep nuclear gray matter volume, an area important for processing and transmitting neural signals to other parts of the brain, at term equivalent age, and by age seven, performed better in IQ, mathematics, working memory, and motor function tests. Overall, ingesting more human milk correlated with better outcomes, including larger regional brain volumes at term equivalent and improved cognitive outcomes at age 7.

“Many mothers of preterm babies have difficulty providing breast milk for their babies, and we need to work hard to ensure that these mothers have the best possible support systems in place to maximize their ability to meet their own feeding goals. It’s also important to note that there are so many factors that influence a baby’s development, with breast milk being just one,” says Belfort.

Researchers note some limitations on the study, including that it was observational. Although they adjusted for factors such as differences in maternal education, some of the effects could possibly be explained by other factors that were not measured, such as greater maternal involvement in other aspects of infant care.

Belfort adds that future studies using other MRI techniques could provide more information about the specific ways in which human milk intake may influence the structure and function of the brain. Future work is also needed to untangle the role of breastfeeding from other types of maternal care and nurturing on development of the preterm baby’s brain.

[“source-gsmarena”]