The eyes have it: understanding your sight

Image result for The eyes have it: understanding your sightTwelve million Australians have a long term eye condition, with our ageing population expected to mean more and more cases of macular degeneration. The good news is that most vision loss is preventable or treatable. Eye experts Professor Greg Dusting and Doctor Peter Van Winjgaarden sit down with Phil Clark for a conversation about the complexities of our eyes, and treatments for eye disease.

[“Source-abc.net”]

 

The eyes have IT: TSB to roll out iris-scanning tech for mobile banking

Human iris. Photo by SHutterstock

TSB has announced plans to roll out iris-scanning technology for its mobile banking app from September.

The move will make the UK high street bank the first in Europe to debut iris-scanning tech.

TSB’s iris recognition tech [source: TSB]

Biometric authentication for banking, in general, has become commonplace over recent years with fingerprints among the preferred method, thanks in large part the inclusion of fingerprint reader technology in higher-end smartphones, particularly since the launch of Apple’s TouchID back in 2013. Voice recognition is used elsewhere in the banking industry, particularly in call centres.

The TSB tech is based on technology from Samsung and only customers with the latest Samsung Galaxy S8 will be able to use iris recognition to access their TSB accounts. The bank already supports fingerprint recognition-based logins.

TSB told us: “Customers with a Samsung Galaxy S8 or S8+ smartphone will have the option, from September 2017, to unlock their TSB mobile banking app using the Samsung Pass iris scanner. TSB’s consumer customers will be able to access their banking using either the fingerprint (an existing feature) or the iris scanner, without any need to remember lengthy IDs or passwords.

TSB’s chief information officer, Carlos Abarca, said iris recognition was more secure than other forms of biometrics. “It takes advantage of 266 different characteristics, compared with 40 for fingerprints,” he said.

“Iris recognition allows you to unlock your TSB mobile app with a simple glance, meaning all of those IDs, passwords and memorable information become a thing of the past.”

The tech offers a blend of security and convenience, according to the bank. Once customers log in after going through an iris scan app, they will need to enter a password or secret number, a TSB spokesman explained. Use of the tech is optional and other account access options will continue to be offered.

German hackers from the Chaos Computer Club were recently able to trick a Samsung Galaxy S8’s iris scanner with a picture of the device owner’s eye and a contact lens. TSB said it was relying not only on biometrics but on a digital certificate pushed onto the phone during the enrolment process, so would-be hackers would need not only a high definition image of their target’s iris but their smartphone in any serious attempt to circumvent the bank’s authentication controls.

Security experts gave the move a cautious welcome, noting that biometrics are useful but far from invulnerable. Biometric security is no longer the stuff of spy or sci-fi films. The technology is more secure than password alone but by no means a panacea.

Etienne Greeff, CTO and co-founder of SecureData, commented: “It’s good to see businesses like TSB looking to replace passwords, which are flimsy and easily breached, but hackers are wise to biometrics and it won’t stop them from trying to get their hands on your data. Biometric security has been hacked in the past and there are countless examples of fingerprints being copied, voices being mimicked and iris-scanning software being tricked.”

Multiple attacks on fingerprint scanners have been recorded over the years. HSBC’s voice recognition security system was recently fooled by a BBC journalist and his brother.

“Biometric authentication is not entirely immune to potential attack and therefore should not be relied on as the sole means of verifying a user,” said Richard Parris, chief exec at Intercede. “Rather than use biometrics in isolation, instead businesses need to be looking at strong authentication that incorporates three distinct elements – possession (something you have, such as a smartphone), knowledge (something you know, such as a PIN) and inherence (something you are, an iris scan).

“This allows businesses to verify that the person accessing the service is who they say they are, in addition to limiting the amount of times an individual can attempt access if any of these elements are missing or incorrect.”

Companies storing authentication data have a greater responsibility to safeguard it because it’s harder to recover from breaches. Fingerprint or iris patterns can’t be revoked and changed, unlike password or credit cards. “With board directors to soon be responsible for complying with GDPR, more consideration needs to be had for security techniques deployed today and how we can better protect consumers,” SecureData’s Greeff concluded. ®

[“Source-theregister”]

Nearly 1/2 of breast cancer patients have severe treatment side effects, 1 in 20 Indians suffers from depression

Health weekly roundupHealth weekly roundup
This week was packed with some very shocking yet important health news. To ensure that you don’t miss any, we bring you a weekly roundup. Here is this week’s aggregation of the latest news stories on health, fitness and diet.

Insomnia may triple the risk of asthma: Study

Asthma affects approximately 300 million people worldwide, with major risk factors including smoking, obesity and air pollution.

Mother’s cervical bacteria may help prevent premature birth

The presence of bacteria in a woman’s vagina and cervix may either increase the risk of premature birth or have a protective effect against it, researchers say.

Attention parents! Cooking in those aluminium pans may reduce your kid’s IQ

The findings published in journal Science of the Total Environment, indicate that cadmium is neurotoxic in children and causes kidney damage which is linked to cardiovascular deaths and is carcinogenic.

Eating celery, broccoli can improve treatment of breast cancer

The findings indicate that Luteolin, a naturally occurring, non-toxic plant compound that has been proven effective against several types of cancer.

‘Anxiety, depression may up risk of death from cancers’

Higher levels of anxiety and depression may increase the risk of death from certain cancers, scientists have warned.

Nearly half of breast cancer patients have severe treatment side effects

Many women being treated for breast cancer suffer from severe treatment side effects even when they don’t receive chemotherapy, a recent study suggests.

One in every 20 Indians suffers from depression

Indians popped in more anti-depressants than ever before in 2016, indicating perhaps that they are now more open to the idea of seeking help for mental health problems.

Wrongly diagnosed foot injury may cause arthritis, chronic pain

The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Review has highlighted the importance of additional imaging, second opinions for accurate diagnosis and treatment.

Only 1% of R&D funds spent for HIV, TB and malaria: WHO

Investments in health research and development (R&D) are poorly aligned with global public health needs, the World Health Organisation said.

Healthy food may benefit people with HIV, diabetes: Study

Mediterranean diet loaded with fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins and healthy fats for six months may benefit people with HIV and Type 2 diabetes.

Cheap breath test may detect stomach, oesophageal cancers

Scientists have developed a cheap and non-invasive test that can measure the levels of five chemicals in the breath to detect cancers of the oesophagus and stomach with 85 per cent accuracy.

source”cnbc”

All universities to have ‘Grievance Redressal Cell’ within four months: Delhi High Court directs UGC

Appointment of an ‘ombudsman’ in every university and a grievance redressal committee (GRC) for every college or group of colleges are now “mandatory”.

Delhi High Court

Delhi High Court

  • No fellowship to non-NET candidates: UGC
  • CBSE won’t apply its 3 Indian language plan for Class 10 Board exam till 2020
  • CBSE: Physical education to be made compulsory for Class 10 students
  • Neighbourhood criteria, not a new concept: DoE
  • Congress MP raises issue of student suicide in RS

The Delhi High Court, on Friday, after identifying the need to address the grievances faced by scores of students in colleges and universities, directed the University Grants Commission (UGC) to set up ‘Grievance Redressal Cell’ in all varsities within four months.

A bench of Chief Justice G Rohini and Justice Sangita Dhingra Sehgal said appointment of an ‘ombudsman’ in every university and a grievance redressal committee (GRC) for every college or group of colleges were “mandatory” and were provided  for under the UGC (Grievance Redressal) Regulations of 2012.

Also Read: No fellowship to non-NET candidates: UGC

The court said failure of the universities to appoint ombudsman or to constitute GRC for colleges “would defeat the very object of grievance redressal mechanism provided under the regulations”. It also directed Delhi University (DU) to “take necessary steps forthwith and appoint the ombudsman” in terms of provisions of the regulations “as expeditiously as possible preferably within a period of four months from today”.

The court’s ruling came while disposing of a PIL filed by a former law student, who had alleged non-compliance of the UGC regulations with regard to appointment of ombudsman by universities, particularly DU.

As per the regulations, the ombudsman “shall be a part-time officer appointed for a period of three years or until he attains the age of 70 years, whichever is earlier”, the bench noted in its judgment

source”cnbc”

Nearly 1/2 of breast cancer patients have severe treatment side effects, 1 in 20 Indians suffers from depression

Health weekly roundupHealth weekly roundup

This week was packed with some very shocking yet important health news. To ensure that you don’t miss any, we bring you a weekly roundup. Here is this week’s aggregation of the latest news stories on health, fitness and diet.

Insomnia may triple the risk of asthma: Study

Asthma affects approximately 300 million people worldwide, with major risk factors including smoking, obesity and air pollution.

Mother’s cervical bacteria may help prevent premature birth

The presence of bacteria in a woman’s vagina and cervix may either increase the risk of premature birth or have a protective effect against it, researchers say.

Attention parents! Cooking in those aluminium pans may reduce your kid’s IQ

The findings published in journal Science of the Total Environment, indicate that cadmium is neurotoxic in children and causes kidney damage which is linked to cardiovascular deaths and is carcinogenic.

Eating celery, broccoli can improve treatment of breast cancer

The findings indicate that Luteolin, a naturally occurring, non-toxic plant compound that has been proven effective against several types of cancer.

‘Anxiety, depression may up risk of death from cancers’

Higher levels of anxiety and depression may increase the risk of death from certain cancers, scientists have warned.

Nearly half of breast cancer patients have severe treatment side effects

Many women being treated for breast cancer suffer from severe treatment side effects even when they don’t receive chemotherapy, a recent study suggests.

One in every 20 Indians suffers from depression

Indians popped in more anti-depressants than ever before in 2016, indicating perhaps that they are now more open to the idea of seeking help for mental health problems.

Wrongly diagnosed foot injury may cause arthritis, chronic pain

The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Review has highlighted the importance of additional imaging, second opinions for accurate diagnosis and treatment.

Only 1% of R&D funds spent for HIV, TB and malaria: WHO

Investments in health research and development (R&D) are poorly aligned with global public health needs, the World Health Organisation said.

Healthy food may benefit people with HIV, diabetes: Study

Mediterranean diet loaded with fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins and healthy fats for six months may benefit people with HIV and Type 2 diabetes.

Cheap breath test may detect stomach, oesophageal cancers

Scientists have developed a cheap and non-invasive test that can measure the levels of five chemicals in the breath to detect cancers of the oesophagus and stomach with 85 per cent accuracy.

Protein can cut progression of both inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer: Study

A new study finds that altering the shape of a protein can significantly reduce the progression of inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer.

Children exposed to complications at birth are at risk of autism, study finds

A study by Kaiser Permanente found that children who were exposed to complications shortly before or during birth, including birth asphyxia and preeclampsia, were more likely to develop autism spectrum disorder.

source”cnbc”

LeEco X10 gets benchmarked, will have dual cameras on the front and the back

Back in November China’s TENAA certified the upcoming LeEco Le X850 for sale in the country, though it still hasn’t launched. And now it looks like the same handset (or a slightly different version of it) was put through the paces of GFXBench, which as usual has resulted in a pretty complete listing of its specs on the benchmark’s website.

The phone’s model number is said to be X85x, and the second “x” could obviously stand for “0”. Then again, GFXBench also calls it X10 as if that may be its name, so it’s unclear what’s going on here. Finally note that there are some small differences between the specs outed by TENAA for the X850 and what GFXBench lists for the X10/X85x.

The Chinese regulatory authority spoke of a device with a 5.7-inch QHD screen, Snapdragon 821 chipset, 4GB of RAM, 64GB of storage, dual 13 MP rear cameras, and a 16 MP selfie snapper.

GFXBench says it has a 5.5-inch QHD display, the Snapdragon 820 at the helm, 4 or 6GB of RAM, 32 or 64GB of storage, a 12 MP + 12 MP dual rear camera setup (with 4K video recording), and surprisingly a 16 MP + 16 MP dual front camera arrangement too. Four camera sensors on one device are apparently becoming mainstream this year.

There’s still no telling when the LeEco X850 / X10 / X85x will finally be outed, but hopefully that will happen soon. And with MWC practically right around the corner, it could be that LeEco is waiting for that particular setting for its grand unveiling.

source”cnbc”

Need to have innovation chapters in educational institutions: Chandrababu Naidu

“Every high school should have an innovation chapter, every university should have an innovation chapter. What is innovation, what we are doing differently,” Naidu said

In picture, Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Chandrababu Naidu (File Photo)

In picture, Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Chandrababu Naidu (File Photo)

  • Himachal Pradesh gives approval to Mukhya Mantri Shikshak Samman Yojana
  • Plans to bring back Class 10 boards soon: HRD Minister
  • Country celebrates National Education Day on November 11: Know why it is celebrated
  • University of Birmingham and Punjab University vouch for quality life
  • DTE to change engineering entrance examination pattern: Dayanand Meshram

Stressing on the need for new research, Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Chandrababu Naidu said that every university or educational institution should have a special ‘innovation chapter’ in it.

“Every high school should have a innovation chapter, every university should have an innovation chapter. What is innovation, what we are doing differently,” Naidu said.

Views of Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Chandrababu Naidu:

  • He said huge companies have come up world over from IT giants to other service providers only on the basis of innovations
  • Government also applied some of the innovations like utilising power infrastructure to carry fibre lines to reduce costs, mentioned Naidu
  • The Andhra Pradesh CM said that steps have been taken to improve student faculty ratio (SFR) in higher education by the state government
  • He said the state government has undertaken several initiatives focusing on strengthening State Universities, establishing premier national institutes and also attracting private sector investments into higher education sector
  •  “Besides this, we have setup a 25-member State Knowledge Advisory Board with eminent educators, industrialist and academicians from across the Globe to help formulate and implement a road map for higher education in the state,” he added
  • Addressing an event organised by FICCI, Naidu said that in his earlier stint as Chief Minister, he realised that knowledge economy is crucial and during that time many new colleges came up.
  • source”cnbc”

Need to have innovation chapters in educational institutions: Chandrababu Naidu

“Every high school should have an innovation chapter, every university should have an innovation chapter. What is innovation, what we are doing differently,” Naidu said

In picture, Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Chandrababu Naidu (File Photo)

In picture, Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Chandrababu Naidu (File Photo)

  • Himachal Pradesh gives approval to Mukhya Mantri Shikshak Samman Yojana
  • Plans to bring back Class 10 boards soon: HRD Minister
  • Country celebrates National Education Day on November 11: Know why it is celebrated
  • University of Birmingham and Punjab University vouch for quality life
  • DTE to change engineering entrance examination pattern: Dayanand Meshram

Stressing on the need for new research, Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Chandrababu Naidu said that every university or educational institution should have a special ‘innovation chapter’ in it.

“Every high school should have a innovation chapter, every university should have an innovation chapter. What is innovation, what we are doing differently,” Naidu said.

Views of Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister Chandrababu Naidu:

  • He said huge companies have come up world over from IT giants to other service providers only on the basis of innovations
  • Government also applied some of the innovations like utilising power infrastructure to carry fibre lines to reduce costs, mentioned Naidu
  • The Andhra Pradesh CM said that steps have been taken to improve student faculty ratio (SFR) in higher education by the state government
  • He said the state government has undertaken several initiatives focusing on strengthening State Universities, establishing premier national institutes and also attracting private sector investments into higher education sector
  •  “Besides this, we have setup a 25-member State Knowledge Advisory Board with eminent educators, industrialist and academicians from across the Globe to help formulate and implement a road map for higher education in the state,” he added
  • Addressing an event organised by FICCI, Naidu said that in his earlier stint as Chief Minister, he realised that knowledge economy is crucial and during that time many new colleges came up..
  • source”cnbc”

Women have sharper memory than men: Study

Women have sharper memory than men: StudyWomen have sharper memory than men: Study
Proving the notion wrong, that man are more intelligent and have sharper memory, a recent study found that middle-aged women outperform age-matched men on all memorymeasures.

However, the research further suggested that the memory of women declines as she enter post-menopause. Women report increased forgetfulness and”brain fog” during the menopause transition.

source”cnbc”

Your DNA can tell how many kids you’ll have

Your DNA can tell how many kids you'll have (Getty Images photo)Your DNA can tell how many kids you’ll have (Getty Images photo)
The age at which you will have your first child and the number of kids you are likely to have may be encoded in your DNA, say scientists who found that genetic data can be used to accurately predict our reproductive behaviour.

The study , led by researchers at University of Oxford, includes an analysis of 62 data sets with information from 2,38,064 men and women on the age at which they had their first child and 3,30,000 men and women for the number of children. Until now, reproductive behaviour was thought to be linked to personal choices or social circumstances.

“We also found that women with DNA variants for postponing parenthood also have bits of DNA code associated with later onset of menstruation and later menopause,” said professor Melinda Mills.

The study shows that DNA variants linked with the age at which people have their firstborn are also associated with characteristics reflecting reproduction and sexual development, such as the age at which girls have their first period, when the voice breaks in boys and at what stage women experience their menopause.

source”cnbc”