Is this the key to stopping cancer from spreading?

Cancer cells dividing

Divide and conquer – can metastasis be controlled?
When a tumor migrates to another part of the body, it makes cancer much more difficult to beat. A recently published study, investigating a metabolite called 20-HETE, gives new insight into this process and how it might be stopped.

Cancer’s ability to metastasize – move through the body and take root in a distant location – is a thorn in the side of cancer treatments.

A localized tumor is much easier to treat, and chances of survival are greater. Once the tumor has moved on, it can be harder to control. Around 30 percent of people with breast cancer experience metastasis, commonly affecting the lymph nodes, bones, brain, lungs, and liver.

Understanding how a tumor sets up shop in distant parts of the body is an important area of study. The trouble is, cancer is incredibly adept at finding a new location; in fact, tumors constantly send out cells into the bloodstream to see if they take hold and flourish. They are also experts at recruiting cellular assistance and making their new home perfect for supporting their continued growth.

New research, looking at a metabolite called 20-HETE, hopes to learn how we can disrupt cancer’s ability to succeed in distant tissues.

What is 20-HETE?

20-HETE (20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid) is a breakdown product of arachidonic acid, a fatty acid used widely throughout the body. 20-HETE carries out a number of useful roles, including the regulation of vascular tone, blood flow to organs, and sodium and fluid transport in the kidney. The metabolite also plays a role in inflammation, helping the body fight off infections and other diseases.

Aside from its natural and positive effects, 20-HETE appears to have a darker, more sinister side; these murky depths are currently being plumbed by postdoctoral fellow Dr. Thaiz F. Borin and his team at Augusta University, GA. His latest findings are published this week in PLOS ONE.

Co-author Dr. B.R. Achyut, assistant professor in the MCG Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, explains 20-HETE’s Jekyll and Hyde personality:

“There is normal function, and there is tumor-associated function. Tumors highjack our system and use that molecule against us.”

According to recent studies, 20-HETE provides the cancer with virtually everything that it needs; it forms part of the “seed and soil” hypothesis. For a cancer cell to up sticks and move, it needs all of its ducks in a row. It must detach from its position and become aggressive enough to survive the journey; then, once it has found a new site, it needs to recruit supporting tissue and blood vessels.

According to Dr. Ali S. Arbab, leader of the Tumor Angiogenesis Initiative at the Georgia Cancer Center, recent studies show that 20-HETE prepares the new site in a number of ways. The metabolite activates helpful protein kinases and growth factors that encourage cells to grow in size, proliferate, and differentiate.

To flourish, tumors are also dependent on the creation of new blood vessels, and 20-HETE can help in this regard. Additionally, 20-HETE turns up inflammation, a hallmark of many diseases, including cancer. It manages this

Disrupting the tumor microenvironment

In Dr. Arbab’s studies on metastasis and the processes behind it, he and his team are focused on “going after that tumor microenvironment.” In the most recent study, they used a molecule called HET0016, which inhibits the actions of 20-HETE.

To test HET0016’s ability to scupper 20-HETE’s homemaking powers, they inserted cancer cells in the mammary fat pad of mice. Once the cancer had set down roots and begun to spread, they injected the mice with HET0016. The drug was given for 5 days a week for 3 weeks.

After just 48 hours, cancer cells were less able to move freely around their test tube.

The drugs also reduced levels of metalloproteinases in the lungs; these enzymes destroy protein structures, allowing cancer cells to penetrate and new blood vessels to grow.

Similarly, other molecules useful to cancer cells, such as growth factors and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, were reduced. As Arbab says, “It gets rid of one of the natural protections tumors use, and tumor growth in the lung goes down.”

Although HET0016 is not ready for use in humans, the study demonstrates that 20-HETE could be a useful target for preventing cancer’s spread. Arbab notes that there are already certain drugs on the market – including some over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs – that might also inhibit this hijacked molecular pathway.

The team plans to continue looking for ways to prevent cancer from coercing 20-HETE into playing the bad guy. Preventing breast cancer from metastasizing would be a huge step forward because, as the authors write, “Distant metastasis is the primary cause of death in the majority of breast cancer types.”

[“Source-medicalnewstoday”]

You Asked: Am I Gaining Muscle Weight or Fat From My Workout?

Exercise-Package-pink-stretch-band-health-time-guide-fitness-bethan-mooney

Apart from an iced latte here and a skipped workout there, you’ve been good about sticking to your new health regimen. So it’s frustrating to step on the scale and see your weight has hardly budged. Or worse, you’ve put on a few pounds.

But wait, doesn’t muscle weigh more than fat? You have added pushups to your workouts…

Unfortunately, the odds that you’ve added even a small amount of muscle, let alone a few pounds of the stuff, is highly unlikely, says Dr. Lawrence Cheskin, director of the Johns Hopkins Weight Management Center. “Unless you’re actively body-building”—think hour-long, three-days-a-week weight room workouts—“it’s very hard to gain a pound or more of muscle.”

Even if you are hitting the weights regularly, you’re not going to gain muscle weight rapidly, especially in the beginning. “It’s going to take at least four to six weeks of consistent training to experience significant gains,” says Michele Olson, an adjunct professor of sports science at Huntingdon University. Unless you’re engaged in some Arnold-level lifting, the two or three pounds you’ve added aren’t muscle.

But that doesn’t necessarily mean it’s fat, either. “In the short term, almost any changes in body weight, either up or down, are going to be from fluid shifts,” Cheskin says.

Cut added salt from your diet, and you’ll lose a lot of retained water very quickly. Or, if you weigh yourself after a hard, sweaty workout but before you rehydrate, you’re likely to have dropped a few pounds. “That can be gratifying, but it’s not meaningful,” Cheskin says.

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A new exercise program could also cause you to retain some extra fluid. “When you start working out and you’re sweating, your body is smart, and it understands that its volume of fluid is not at the level it typically would be,” Olson says. In order to prevent dehydration, your body responds by storing extra water, which can cause your weight to increase by a few pounds. The same thing can happen as the summer temperatures tick up and your body adjusts to the added heat and increased rate of sweating. (Combine the onset of summer with a new, intense workout schedule, and you can expect to add at least a few pounds due to water retention.)

On the other hand, you may drop a few pounds when fall temperatures arrive or you quit exercising. “If you’ve been working out a lot and you suddenly stop, I guarantee you will lose some water weight,” Olson says.

MORE: The TIME Guide To Exercise

All of these short-term factors help explain why most exercise physiologists and weight-loss counselors tell people not to get too hung up on the number on the scale. Your body weight is not a static measure or one composed solely of your proportion of fat to muscle. It’s going to slide up and down based on a lot of variables that don’t have much to do with your health.

That doesn’t mean you should trash your bathroom scale; some researchsuggests that overweight adults who weigh themselves regularly are more likely to stick with the diet and exercise routines that help them shed pounds.

But you’re better off weighing yourself just once or twice a week—first thing in the morning, after you pee but before you eat—and keeping track of how your weight shifts over a period of several weeks or months. The long-term pattern of weight gain or loss is a better indicator of how you’re doing. “Especially if you get upset by those day-to-day fluctuations, it’s better not to torture yourself,” Cheskin says.

The best way to keep tabs on your body weight has nothing to do with scales. “Just ask yourself if your clothes are fitting you better or looser, or if you have more energy, or if you feel healthier,” Olson says.

If you answer yes to these questions, whatever you’re doing is working.

[“Source-time”]

Experimental gene-silencing drug from Alnylam and Sanofi shows strong results in hemophilia

Alnylam CEO John Maraganore aims to compete with what is expected to be a blockbuster hemophilia drug from Roche.

A

n experimental hemophilia drug developed by Alnylam Pharmaceuticals continues to staunch bleeding in patients followed for almost one year in an ongoing, mid-stage clinical trial, the company reported Monday.

The promising results could intensify an already heated competition to develop novel treatments for the inherited bleeding disorder. The Alnylam drug, developed in partnership with Sanofi, uses a technology called RNAi to shut down dysfunctional genes. It’s a promising approach that’s attracted billions in research dollars, but hasn’t yet been used in an actual drug approved for sale.

The company says the new data support its recent decision to advance its RNAi hemophilia drug —  known as fitusiran —  into phase 3 clinical trials. If it succeeds, the drug could potentially compete against an expected blockbuster hemophilia drug from Roche.

In the current study, 33 patients have been injected once a month with fitusiran. The results so far: 48 percent have not bled after a median observation period of 11 months, according to data reported Monday at the International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis Congress in Berlin. Some patients in the study have been followed for up to 20 months.

Before starting the study, patients were reporting a median of 20 bleeding events per year. That number was reduced to 1 following the fitusarin injections.

The patients have two types of the disease, hemophilia A and B. Fourteen of the patients have inhibitors —  immune system antibodies that interfere with clotting factors commonly used to treat hemophilia. Patients with inhibitors are the hardest to treat effectively.

For this group, the median annualized bleed rate fell from 38 to zero, although the median observation period was shorter at six months.

Sixty-four percent of the inhibitor patients have not bled since starting treatment with fitusiran.

“These are really encouraging numbers,” said Alnylam Chief Medical Officer Pushtal Garg, in a phone interview from Berlin on Sunday. “To show annual bleed rates of one and zero is remarkable, particularly for a treatment that is administered once per month with a subcutaneous, low-volume injection.”

One third of the fitusiran-treated patients in the study reported elevated liver enzymes, a possible signal of liver toxicity, though all these patients also had hepatitis C, Alnylam said. One patient with increased liver enzymes stopped participating in the study; the rest had no symptoms and their liver enzyme issues were resolved.

There were no blood clots reported by patients in the fitusiran study. That could help the drug stand apart from Roche’s hemophilia drug emicizumab, which had a handful of serious blood clots reported in its phase 3 studies.

Roche intends to submit emicizumab for approval this year to treat hemophilia A patients with inhibitors to standard therapy. Sixty-three percent of patients receiving emicizumab reported zero treated bleeds compared with 6 percent of patients treated with bypassing agents, according to phase 3 study results previously announced. (Those results were also presented Monday at the Berlin meeting and published in the New England Journal of Medicine.)

Some analysts have projected emicizumab’s peak sales could hit $2 billion per year for patients with inhibitors, although that figure is hotly debated given the drug’s blood clotting safety issue. This leaves a potential opening for fitusiran, though its phase 3 trial won’t report data until 2019.

The Roche drug may eventually have other competition, too. Biomarin Pharmaceuticals, Spark Therapeutics, and Uniqure are all developing gene therapies to treat — and potentially cure — hemophilia.

Hemophilia drug franchises from Shire and Novo Nordisk are at risk of losing billions of dollars in sales if these new hemophilia drugs are approved. Though there are just 20,000 patients with hemophilia in the U.S., it’s a highly lucrative market.

On Sunday, Shire took the unusual step of fighting back with a preliminary injunction from a German court against Roche. Shire accused Roche of disseminating “inaccurate and misleading” information about the safety and serious adverse events that occurred in the phase 3 clinical trial of emicizumab, according to Reuters. In a statement, Roche said it stood behind the emicizumab data.

Alnylam, which is based in Cambridge, Mass., develops drugs that work through a process called RNA interference, or RNAi. All of its drugs, including fitusiran, are snippets of genetic code known as RNA that turn off genes producing disease-causing proteins. Fitusiran blocks the production of antithrombin, a protein made in the liver that prevents blood from clotting. Monthly injections of fitusiran reduce antithrombin in patients and increase corresponding levels of thrombin, another protein that promotes blood clotting.

Last October, Alnylam shares fell sharply after another of its RNAi drugs caused more deaths than a placebo in a phase 3 study. Work on that drug was halted.

But Alnylam shares have recovered this year, up 125 percent to date, on renewed investor optimism for its late-stage drug pipeline, including another RNAi drug, patisiran, targeting a rare nerve disease.

At Friday’s $84.08 close, Alnylam carries an almost $8 billion market valuation. It doesn’t yet have a drug on the market, which means investors are giving the company a lot of credit already for its late-stage RNAi pipeline, including fitusarin.

[“Source-statnews”]

Shield Eyes From Infection During Monsoon

Image result for Shield Eyes From Infection During MonsoonImage for representation purpose only

While enjoying the rainy season, don’t forget to take care of your eyes as the climate also encourages infective microorganisms to thrive. Avoid infections like conjunctivitis, sties, dry eyes and corneal ulcers by using clean towels and more, say experts.

Uma Singh, Medical Consultant at Ozone Group, Gowri Kulkarni, Head of Medical Operations, DocsApp and Shailja Mittal, Creative Head at Zapyle, have listed ways to avoid eye problems:

* Most eye diseases are transmitted by hand-to-eye contact. Therefore, wash your hands before touching your eyes in order to reduce or prevent infection.

* Avoid rubbing your eyes as that only increases the chances of spreading the infection. Instead, use disposable tissues to wipe off the overflowing discharge or tears.

* Avoid getting wet in the rain. Always wear adequately protective rain gear.

* Be careful of dirty water, muck and dampness during the monsoon season.

* Do not use contact lenses if you have eye-irritation, red eye or any form of abnormal discharge.

* Be careful about using expired make-up around your eyes, and if using contact lenses, make sure you never share your solution or container with someone else.

* Don’t share personal products with others. Items like handkerchiefs, sunglasses and contact lenses should not be shared with others because they can carry highly contagious infections.

[“Source-news18”]

I Got A $1,200 Virtual Reality Facial From John Mayer’s Favorite Skin Line

“I’m getting a $1,200 virtual reality facial that uses John Mayer’s favorite European skin-care products tomorrow — and it’s in an oxygen bubble,” I told my boyfriend last week.
Most men outside of the beauty industry would have thought this was odd conversation, but after seven months of dating, I have my boyfriend on a dedicated skin routine that’s kept his complexion clear and bright — and he’s into it. Meanwhile, he’s exposed me to all that virtual reality, or VR, has to offer, including games, experiences, and a working knowledge of how the technology will inevitably change the future of media — and I’m into it.
So when I heard about a treatment that brings these two seemingly opposite experiences together, I had to try it out.
You may know Natura Bissé as the Spanish brand front and center in John Mayer’s slightly-satirical stab at beauty vlogging last year. In the viral Snapchat videos, he shared his most effective hacks for better skin, including Mayer-isms like CNZs, or “crucial necessity zones” that should be always covered with face cream (so, basically just everywhere) and D.A.T., or “direct application technique,” which involves squirting face cream directly onto skin to limit product waste on fingers. (Spoiler: This is not actually effective.)
Jokes aside, the reason these videos went viral is not because of his application techniques, but because his entire routine rang in at a whopping $1,457. But hold onto your debit cards, because this year, the brand’s implementing a treatment that’s just as novel — and nearly as expensive.
Called The Mindful Touch Experience, it is, according to the brand, “the most innovative and trailblazing venture within the spa sector, in which the results of Natura Bissé’s cosmetics are combined with the most advanced technology.” So how does it work? “Through virtual reality, mindfulness and the therapist’s expertise – the touch – we invite the client to reconnect with the here and now, to relax their body, to awaken their senses and to experience the pleasure of beauty in a more intense way,” the official statement reads. Still confused? I was, too.
Let’s get this out of the way first: At $1,200 for one hour, the facial is far from affordable. However, this has less to do with the bubble itself or the VR technology and more to do with the fact that the brand’s products are just really pricey. Even though I was getting it at a comped press appointment, I still felt a little guilty.
The brand is famous for its bubbles and there are only a few, so you have to catch one while it’s on tour. (Yes, the bubble has more expensive tickets and fewer tour dates than Bieber.) It’s large enough for a bed, a table, and your aesthetician, and it’s filled with 99% pure oxygen, which it supposed to help with the absorption of products. Once you enter said bubble, you remove your robe and lie down, then affix the VR headset.
For eight minutes, you’re walked through a virtual reality experience — you travel through the ocean, wander around a brain, and are led on what is essentially a guided meditation to relax and let go of stress. Meanwhile, your aesthetician is floating essential oils under your nose and massaging your head and limbs to sync with what you’re seeing. It was pretty amazing.
But then, after eight minutes, the headset comes off and the facial begins. As far as facials go, this one was pretty standard: cleanse, tone, mask, peel (but no extractions, unfortunately). As a wonderful added bonus, though, the guided meditation continued, so I was reminded throughout the experience to clear my mind and stay present.
“I’m getting a $1,200 virtual reality facial that uses John Mayer’s favorite European skin-care products tomorrow — and it’s in an oxygen bubble,” I told my boyfriend last week.
Most men outside of the beauty industry would have thought this was odd conversation, but after seven months of dating, I have my boyfriend on a dedicated skin routine that’s kept his complexion clear and bright — and he’s into it. Meanwhile, he’s exposed me to all that virtual reality, or VR, has to offer, including games, experiences, and a working knowledge of how the technology will inevitably change the future of media — and I’m into it.
So when I heard about a treatment that brings these two seemingly opposite experiences together, I had to try it out.
You may know Natura Bissé as the Spanish brand front and center in John Mayer’s slightly-satirical stab at beauty vlogging last year. In the viral Snapchat videos, he shared his most effective hacks for better skin, including Mayer-isms like CNZs, or “crucial necessity zones” that should be always covered with face cream (so, basically just everywhere) and D.A.T., or “direct application technique,” which involves squirting face cream directly onto skin to limit product waste on fingers. (Spoiler: This is not actually effective.)
Jokes aside, the reason these videos went viral is not because of his application techniques, but because his entire routine rang in at a whopping $1,457. But hold onto your debit cards, because this year, the brand’s implementing a treatment that’s just as novel — and nearly as expensive.
Called The Mindful Touch Experience, it is, according to the brand, “the most innovative and trailblazing venture within the spa sector, in which the results of Natura Bissé’s cosmetics are combined with the most advanced technology.” So how does it work? “Through virtual reality, mindfulness and the therapist’s expertise – the touch – we invite the client to reconnect with the here and now, to relax their body, to awaken their senses and to experience the pleasure of beauty in a more intense way,” the official statement reads. Still confused? I was, too.
My Time In The Bubble
Let’s get this out of the way first: At $1,200 for one hour, the facial is far from affordable. However, this has less to do with the bubble itself or the VR technology and more to do with the fact that the brand’s products are just really pricey. Even though I was getting it at a comped press appointment, I still felt a little guilty.
The brand is famous for its bubbles and there are only a few, so you have to catch one while it’s on tour. (Yes, the bubble has more expensive tickets and fewer tour dates than Bieber.) It’s large enough for a bed, a table, and your aesthetician, and it’s filled with 99% pure oxygen, which it supposed to help with the absorption of products. Once you enter said bubble, you remove your robe and lie down, then affix the VR headset.
For eight minutes, you’re walked through a virtual reality experience — you travel through the ocean, wander around a brain, and are led on what is essentially a guided meditation to relax and let go of stress. Meanwhile, your aesthetician is floating essential oils under your nose and massaging your head and limbs to sync with what you’re seeing. It was pretty amazing.
But then, after eight minutes, the headset comes off and the facial begins. As far as facials go, this one was pretty standard: cleanse, tone, mask, peel (but no extractions, unfortunately). As a wonderful added bonus, though, the guided meditation continued, so I was reminded throughout the experience to clear my mind and stay present.
The Results
The facial was great — my skin looked and felt radiant, soft, and hydrated for days (for $1,200 it had better, right?), but it wasn’t unlike anything I’ve ever tried. What excited me most was seeing a beauty brand find a way to use VR to relax the client and add another layer to a classic spa experience.
The headset (a Samsung) and the content weren’t the best quality I’ve seen, but in the context of where I was (nude, in an oxygen bubble, being fawned over in the middle of a weekday afternoon), it was pretty great.
After all, from Coachella installations to the future of surfing Facebook or watching YouTube, VR is on the horizon — and it’s about time the beauty world dove in. Once they figure out how to do a facial with a headset on the entire time? Then things will get real sci-fi.
Natura Bissé just upped the game, so I guess it’s your move, Mayer.
[“Source-refinery29.”]

IITs to come under Single Engineering Entrance Exam from 2018

The ministry has decided to conduct single engineering entrance test every year and it will be designed in a way that the linguistic diversity of the country is taken into consideration

IITs to come under Single Engineering Entrance Exam

IITs to come under Single Engineering Entrance Exam

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On the lines of NEET-examination, a single engineering entrance examinations will be conducted for admission into engineering colleges from the academic year 2018-19.

It is learnt that the coveted IITs, for which a nationwide competitive examinations are held, may also be brought in under the ambit of the new test.

HRD sets stage for one engineering entrance exam:

The HRD ministry has recently asked the All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE) to explain and mention suitable norms for holding such an exercise.

The HRD ministry has told the AICTE that the proposal is in line with the government’s policy and it could incorporate suitable regulations to enable the holding of such a test, sources said.

The AICTE, oversees the aspects related to technical education in the country, had discussed at a recent meeting proposal for having a single entrance test for engineering colleges for undergraduate courses

Single Engineering Entrance Exam to be conducted multiple times every year:

The ministry has taken this decision to bring in greater transparency, maintain higher standards and also try to ensure that students are saved from the burden of taking too many tests, the sources said. The ministry is also in favour of seeking constructive suggestions from states and Deemed Universities for the successful holding of such a test, they added.

It has also been decided that the single entrance test would be conducted multiple times every year and it will be designed in a way that the linguistic diversity of the country is taken into consideration, the sources said.

A common NEET exam for admission to medical colleges already exists, but there are a number of exams for entrance into engineering colleges.

source”cnbc”

Nearly 1/2 of breast cancer patients have severe treatment side effects, 1 in 20 Indians suffers from depression

Health weekly roundupHealth weekly roundup
This week was packed with some very shocking yet important health news. To ensure that you don’t miss any, we bring you a weekly roundup. Here is this week’s aggregation of the latest news stories on health, fitness and diet.

Insomnia may triple the risk of asthma: Study

Asthma affects approximately 300 million people worldwide, with major risk factors including smoking, obesity and air pollution.

Mother’s cervical bacteria may help prevent premature birth

The presence of bacteria in a woman’s vagina and cervix may either increase the risk of premature birth or have a protective effect against it, researchers say.

Attention parents! Cooking in those aluminium pans may reduce your kid’s IQ

The findings published in journal Science of the Total Environment, indicate that cadmium is neurotoxic in children and causes kidney damage which is linked to cardiovascular deaths and is carcinogenic.

Eating celery, broccoli can improve treatment of breast cancer

The findings indicate that Luteolin, a naturally occurring, non-toxic plant compound that has been proven effective against several types of cancer.

‘Anxiety, depression may up risk of death from cancers’

Higher levels of anxiety and depression may increase the risk of death from certain cancers, scientists have warned.

Nearly half of breast cancer patients have severe treatment side effects

Many women being treated for breast cancer suffer from severe treatment side effects even when they don’t receive chemotherapy, a recent study suggests.

One in every 20 Indians suffers from depression

Indians popped in more anti-depressants than ever before in 2016, indicating perhaps that they are now more open to the idea of seeking help for mental health problems.

Wrongly diagnosed foot injury may cause arthritis, chronic pain

The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Review has highlighted the importance of additional imaging, second opinions for accurate diagnosis and treatment.

Only 1% of R&D funds spent for HIV, TB and malaria: WHO

Investments in health research and development (R&D) are poorly aligned with global public health needs, the World Health Organisation said.

Healthy food may benefit people with HIV, diabetes: Study

Mediterranean diet loaded with fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins and healthy fats for six months may benefit people with HIV and Type 2 diabetes.

Cheap breath test may detect stomach, oesophageal cancers

Scientists have developed a cheap and non-invasive test that can measure the levels of five chemicals in the breath to detect cancers of the oesophagus and stomach with 85 per cent accuracy.

source”cnbc”

76 per cent students from this university suffer in basic English language skills

A survey conducted by a group of students came across that 76 per cent of students from Ambedkar University Delhi (AUD) suffer problems in English language skills.

76% students from this University suffer problems in basic English language skills

76% students from this University suffer problems in basic English language skills

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A survey conducted by a group of students came across the fact that 76 per cent of students from Ambedkar University Delhi (AUD) suffer problems in basic English language skills i.e. lack of vocabulary, grammatical problems, and problems in sentence formation.

Details of the report:

  • The survey was conducted by the Progressive and Democratic Student Community (PDSC) between October and November 2016
  • A total of 410 students were surveyed
  • The students were from BA, MA, MPhil and PhD batch
  • “A total of 76 per cent students from government schools face problems related to basic English language skills i.e. lack of vocabulary, grammatical problems, and problems in sentence formation and so on. On the other hand, students from private schools face problems with academic jargon, complexity of ideas and lack of confidence among others,” the group noted according to an Indian Express report
  • As per the reports, “The purpose of such a survey is to remind students, professors, and the administration that the question of language is extremely sensitive, pervasive and complex.”

Students who are affected by this problem include:

  • Women and those from ‘lower’ castes, in particular the poor, Dalit, Bahujan, Adivasi
  • “This creates a sense of deficiency and inferiority amongst them within the campus. Thus, it is evident that the question of language is a question of social justice,” the group included.
  • 70 percent of men are affected, while the count rate for women is 82.3 per cent
  • source”cnbc”

Nearly 1/2 of breast cancer patients have severe treatment side effects, 1 in 20 Indians suffers from depression

Health weekly roundupHealth weekly roundup

This week was packed with some very shocking yet important health news. To ensure that you don’t miss any, we bring you a weekly roundup. Here is this week’s aggregation of the latest news stories on health, fitness and diet.

Insomnia may triple the risk of asthma: Study

Asthma affects approximately 300 million people worldwide, with major risk factors including smoking, obesity and air pollution.

Mother’s cervical bacteria may help prevent premature birth

The presence of bacteria in a woman’s vagina and cervix may either increase the risk of premature birth or have a protective effect against it, researchers say.

Attention parents! Cooking in those aluminium pans may reduce your kid’s IQ

The findings published in journal Science of the Total Environment, indicate that cadmium is neurotoxic in children and causes kidney damage which is linked to cardiovascular deaths and is carcinogenic.

Eating celery, broccoli can improve treatment of breast cancer

The findings indicate that Luteolin, a naturally occurring, non-toxic plant compound that has been proven effective against several types of cancer.

‘Anxiety, depression may up risk of death from cancers’

Higher levels of anxiety and depression may increase the risk of death from certain cancers, scientists have warned.

Nearly half of breast cancer patients have severe treatment side effects

Many women being treated for breast cancer suffer from severe treatment side effects even when they don’t receive chemotherapy, a recent study suggests.

One in every 20 Indians suffers from depression

Indians popped in more anti-depressants than ever before in 2016, indicating perhaps that they are now more open to the idea of seeking help for mental health problems.

Wrongly diagnosed foot injury may cause arthritis, chronic pain

The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Review has highlighted the importance of additional imaging, second opinions for accurate diagnosis and treatment.

Only 1% of R&D funds spent for HIV, TB and malaria: WHO

Investments in health research and development (R&D) are poorly aligned with global public health needs, the World Health Organisation said.

Healthy food may benefit people with HIV, diabetes: Study

Mediterranean diet loaded with fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins and healthy fats for six months may benefit people with HIV and Type 2 diabetes.

Cheap breath test may detect stomach, oesophageal cancers

Scientists have developed a cheap and non-invasive test that can measure the levels of five chemicals in the breath to detect cancers of the oesophagus and stomach with 85 per cent accuracy.

Protein can cut progression of both inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer: Study

A new study finds that altering the shape of a protein can significantly reduce the progression of inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer.

Children exposed to complications at birth are at risk of autism, study finds

A study by Kaiser Permanente found that children who were exposed to complications shortly before or during birth, including birth asphyxia and preeclampsia, were more likely to develop autism spectrum disorder.

source”cnbc”

One in every 20 Indians suffers from depression

One in every 20 Indians suffers from depression (Thinkstock photos/Getty Images)One in every 20 Indians suffers from depression (Thinkstock photos/Getty Images)
Indians popped in more anti-depressants than ever before in 2016, indicating perhaps that they are now more open to the idea of seeking help for mental health problems.

Around 10.6 lakh more prescriptions for anti-depressants were written in 2016 in comparison to 2015, shows data collated by health information agencies. While 3.35 crore prescriptions (for newly diagnosed patients) were written in 2015, doctors wrote 3.46 crore new prescriptions in 2016.

In fact, the number of prescriptions for anti-depressants written out by psychiatrists in 2016 represented a 14% increase from the previous year. Psychiatrists treat patients with major depressive disorders while doctors hailing from multiple specialties treat patients with mild depression or disease-related depression.

Depression, though widely spread in India, is rarely given importance in the public health system, which is burdened by infectious diseases such as tuberculosis and dengue as well as non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. In October 2016, the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS) in Bengaluru released a mental health survey that said one in every 20 Indians suffered from some form of depression. The prevalence of depression across the world has increased to such an extent that it’s the theme for the World Health Organisation’s World Health Day on April 7.

When contacted, NIMHANS director Dr B N Gangadhar said the increase in the number of prescriptions could also be an indication of the increasing number of psychiatrists in India. “There is no doubt that people are more open than before to seek help for depression, but a 14% rise in prescriptions could also mean there are more psychiatrists today than before,” Dr Gangadhar said, adding that roughly 360 new psychiatrists graduate annually .

Mumbai-based psychiatrist Dr Harish Shetty said there has been a tremendous increase in awareness about mental health. “There is a 100% increase in the number of patients coming to psychiatrists in the last couple of years,” he said, adding that the increase could be the tip of the iceberg.

Goa-based Dr Vikram Patel, who is attached to the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said antidepressants have low penetration in India. “If there is an increase, it is not surprising as more people seek help these days. This doesn’t mean there is an increase in the incidence of depression, but there is an increase in awareness,” he said. A recent survey by a pharma major recently listed family pressure, relationship issues as well as biological changes as the leading causes of depression among Indians.Dr Shetty pinpointed the “rapid shifts taking place in India” in the fields of finance, education, workplace, family , among others, as the major cause for depression. “People try to cramp in a century of living within a decade. The brain is being challenged beyond its potential, leading to an increase in depression rates. It is like an orchestra being disrupted,” said Dr Shetty .

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Depression is closely linked to social determinants.”Some may suffer from depression due to economic difficulties such as debt while women may suffer due to mental difficulties such as domestic violence,” said Dr Patel.

source”cnbc”