27 Contact Lenses Are Found in Woman’s Eye, Doctors Report

Seventeen contact lenses removed by an anaesthetist. A further 10 were found during examination under a microscope by the surgeon. CreditBMJ

For years, she had assumed that the strange sensation in her right eye was just a part of a changing body, nothing worth troubling over.

Fortunately for the unidentified 67-year-old woman, doctors preparing her for routine cataract surgery last November discovered the source and removed it. Unfortunately for the squeamish, the cause was the stuff of nightmares: The woman’s eye had become home to a hard, bluish mass of nearly 30 contact lenses held together by mucus.

The lump the medical team discovered was composed of 17 contact lenses, they reported this month in BMJ, a medical journal. On further examination, they found 10 more.

“We were all shocked she had not noticed!” Dr. Rupal Morjaria, an ophthalmologist in Britain and one of the three authors of the report, said in an email.

It is not clear how long the lenses were in the woman’s eye, but she had worn monthly disposable lenses for 35 years, the doctors said. The cataract surgery was postponed because of a greater risk of infection, but it was later carried out with no long-term complications, Dr. Morjaria said.

She and her colleagues speculated that the patient’s poor vision and deep-set eyes may have contributed to her not noticing the accumulating mass.

“She said she had felt an uncomfortable and gritty eye, ‘like something was inside,’ but she didn’t think it was anything to worry about,” Dr. Morjaria said.

While lenses in Britain may be obtained only following an exam with a specialist, they are easy to buy online, Dr. Morjaria said. In the case of the patient, the lenses were lodged so high up under the eyelid that they would not have been easily spotted, she added.

The team decided to publicize the case to raise awareness about safe contact lens use, she added. While contacts can be an effective way to correct vision, experts note that they must be treated with care.

“This patient was lucky, however contact lens overwear can cause sight threatening complications,” Dr. Morjaria said.

Last summer, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that about 41 million people in the United States wear contact lenses. Only a small percentage get serious eye infections.

To reduce the risk of infection, the agency recommended not sleeping in contact lenses without discussing doing so with an eye doctor, not combining old and new contact lens solution, and replacing lenses as recommended.

The mass was discovered by Dr. Richard Crombie, an anesthesiologist, and was removed by Dr. Amit Patel, an ophthalmologist. Both were authors of the report with Dr. Morjaria.

[“Source-nytimes”]

Tips For Eye Health and Maintaining Good Eyesight

Image result for Representative Image (Photo courtesy: AFP Relaxnews/ Mauro-Matacchione/ Istock.com)Representative Image (Photo courtesy: AFP Relaxnews/ Mauro-Matacchione/ Istock.com)
It’s the age of technology and we are more than ever using our eyes to check our phones, computer screens, gaming consoles and televisions, which can lead to eye fatigue. Eat healthy, exercise regularly and more to take care of eyes, suggest experts.

Ophthalmologists guide you to follow some simple steps:

 Adequate sleep is essential for eye health and allows the eyes to repair and recover. Eight hours of sound sleep at night will go a long way in attaining better visual quality.

* Our eyes require multiple nutrients to function optimally. Vitamins and minerals along with green leafy vegetables and protein sources help to keep the eyes strong and sharp.

* Regular exercise not only keeps your body fit but also makes your eyes healthy by pumping more blood and oxygen to your eyes.

* A majority of office jobs require constant and direct glaring at the computer screen, making it difficult for your eyes. Make sure to take a break, every 20 minutes for at least 20 seconds.

* Regular physical exam at least twice a year will keep you aware and helps to take necessary action in time.

* Keep your eyes protected from exposure to harmful UV rays.

[“Source-news18”]

Magnetic Eye Implant Stops Dancing Eyes Syndrome

Illustration: Magnetic Eye Prosthetic

A 49-year-old man finally got relief from a rare, maddening eye disorder after researchers, in an experimental procedure, implanted specialized magnets beneath his eyeballs. The disorder, called nystagmus, or dancing eyes, causes the eyes to oscillate rhythmically, making the visual scene constantly shake. Scientists from University College London steadied the man’s gaze by surgically implanting in each eye a pair of titanium-encased rare-earth magnets. The researchers reported the case study Saturday in the journal Ophthalmology.

Researchers have come up with all sorts of clever bioengineering solutions that involve magnets and the human body, but never one quite like this, says Parashkev Nachev, a neurologist at University College London who led the experiment. For example, engineers have designed small robots guided by magnetic fields that move through the body to do various jobs, such as perform surgery, navigate blood vessels, deliver drugs, palpate tissue, and take biopsies. And doctors have attached prostheses such as artificial noses to the body using magnets.

Nachev’s implant moves magnets into a new biomedical domain—one his team dubbed “oculomotor prosthetics.” The magnets he and his team used are made of samarium-cobalt and neodymium-iron-boron, which are rare-earth materials that are fairly common in the magnet world. They’re encased in titanium to make them biocompatible. And they’re small, of course—about three millimeters in diameter and one-to-two millimeters long.

The device is simple and the surgery is quick. In each eye, a surgeon sutures the samarium-cobalt magnet to the tendon of the muscle on the underside of the eye and superglues—yes, superglues—the neodymium-iron-boron magnet to the eye socket. “Ophthalmologists love superglue and they use it a lot,” says Nachev. When the 30-minute procedure is completed, the magnets attract with enough pull to steady the dancing eye, but not so much that voluntary eye movement is hindered, the researchers report.

Nachev’s team also built a machine to test the force of the magnets before implanting them. They wanted to make sure the magnets were strong enough to stop oscillation but not strong enough to impede voluntary eye movement.

Nystagmus can be maddening for patients, says Nachev. When the condition pops up later in life, it often accompanies other problems of the central nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis or degenerative conditions. Because the cause of nystagmus is broad and complex, no single drug seems to work for most patients. Among drugs that do work “the effects are not usually dramatic,” says Nachev.

The patient in Nachev’s case study, who asked to remain anonymous, had tried every drug in the book, with no relief. His vision and stability got so bad he lost his job as a truck driver and became unemployed.

So, he asked his doctors about experimental treatments. Nachev’s team had heard about an oral presentation from a Brazilian ophthalmologist named Harley Bicas who, a decade ago, had proposed the concept of using magnets to steady dancing eyes. Nachev’s team took up the concept and designed a prototype with help from Quentin Pankhurst, a professor of physics and biomedical engineering at University College London.

After the surgery, Nachev’s patient saw an immediate and obvious improvement. “His world doesn’t shake as badly as it used to,” Nachev says. The man was able to get a job—although not as a driver—and has had the implants for nearly five years now.

Though the experiment was a success, it has yet to be conducted in any other patients. Nachev’s team is planning to test the magnets in another 6 to 12 people in an upcoming study. They also hope to explore other applications, such as modifying the functioning of the eyelids or changing the movement of the eyes in response to other oculomotor disorders. One could even add an electromagnetic component with an externally powered unit, enabling the force of the magnets to be varied on the fly depending on what the patient is doing.

But there’s one big drawback. Anyone sporting magnets in their bodies runs into a major obstacle: They can’t get an MRI. That could be a significant problem for people with nystagmus who often have other neurological issues that require monitoring by MRI. The machine images the body using strong magnetic fields and could, to put it in the least grotesque way, “displace” the magnets in a patient’s body. “I hate to even think about it,” says Nachev.

[“Source-spectrum”]

iPad game may treat lazy eye condition in kids

IANS | Nov 13, 2016, 02.35 PM IST

<p>iPad game may treat lazy eye condition in kids<br></p>iPad game may treat lazy eye condition in kids

A special type of iPad game effectively helped in treating children with amblyopia in restoring their visual abilities, more than the standard treatment, researchers say.

Amblyopia — also known as the lazy eye — is the leading cause of monocular visual impairment — a condition in which vision in both eyes is used separately and one of the eyes has no vision with adequate vision in the other — in children.

Amblyopia has traditionally been viewed as a monocular disorder that can be treated by patching the fellow eye to force use of the amblyopic eye, but it does not always restore 20/20 vision or teach the eyes to work together.

In the study, the researchers from Retina Foundation of the Southwest in Texas, US, randomly assigned 28 children (average age, seven years) with amblyopia to binocular iPad game treatment and to patching treatment.

The action-oriented adventure iPad game required children to wear special glasses that separate game elements seen by each eye so that reduced-contrast elements are seen by the fellow eye, high-contrast elements are seen by the amblyopic eye, and high-contrast background elements are seen by both eyes.

The results revealed that the amblyopic eye showed best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at the two-week visit.

At two weeks, the children using the standard approach of patching crossed over to binocular game treatment, and all 28 children played the game for another two weeks.

“We show that in just two weeks, visual acuity gain with binocular treatment was half that found with six months of patching, suggesting that binocular treatment may yield faster gains than patching,” said Krista R. Kelly of the Retina Foundation of the Southwest, a non-profit organisation.

source”cnbc”

Innovation in eye care

Innovation in eye care (Carol Yepes/Getty Images)Innovation in eye care (Carol Yepes/Getty Images)
So your doctor has advised a cataract surgery and you have the most important assignment of your career coming up, all at the same time. Fret not. Thanks to outstanding progress in the field of medical science, you can now walk straight to office soon after your surgery, courtesy Micro Incision Cataract Surgery (MICS).

ALL ABOUT MICS

What gives MICS an edge over conventional phacoemulsification surgery? According to Dr Keshab Haldar, consultant ophthalmic surgeon, “Normal cataractsurgery by phacoemulsification is done through 2.8 to 3.2 mm incisions. Reduction in incision size to 2.2 mm in MICS makes the surgery more painless and convenient for the patients. MICS not only gives less residual astigmatism, less optical aberrations, quicker recovery and subsequently more satisfactory visual outcome, chances of developing cylindrical power and surgery induced refractive index are lesser as well.”

Since distortion of the eye is minimal, the end result is safe. “Bimanual MICS can be performed through incisions of about 1.4 to 1.6 mm whereas Coaxial MICS can be done through 2.2 to 2.4 mm incisions. Currently we are using the coaxial MICS through a 2.2 mm incision. It supports advanced technology like hydrophobic IOLs including Toric, Multifocal and Toric Multifocal IOls and is safe and suitable for Indian eyes,” says Haldar.

POINTS TO REMEMBER

As highlighted by Dr Bishwanath Dutta Chowdhury, retina consultant, MICS means a reduction in wound size, which in turn means enhanced safety and stability in eye health. His advice for preventive eye-care?

“Diabetics should be extra careful about their eye-health as they are vulnerable to diabetic retinopathy. Those with family history of glaucoma also need to undergo screening from time to time.”

LATEST TREND IN EYE CARE

As Shiladitya Mukherjee, senior eye consultant, explains, “Speedy recovery in MICS has made it the numero-uno choice among high-end professionals who have to resume work post-surgery. Even children with congenital cataracts can opt for it. It is ideal for diabetics who are prone to infections.”

On similar notes, Rudra Prosad Ghosh, ophthalmic surgeon, roots for MICS over conventional phaco surgery. “In MICS, topical anaesthesia is administered to the patient and the entire procedure is over within 15 minutes. Lesser incision size means lesser post-operative power. With lower chances of complications and almost nil residual post-operative astigmatism, the patient goes home relieved.”

BETTER EYE HEALTH

The key to eye-care lies in modifying simple aspects of your daily life. A diet comprising green vegetables and colourful fruits rich in vitamin A and small fishes is beneficial for healthy eyes.

Another concern among doctors is the rising number of patients being diagnosed with dry-eyes, thanks to alarming pollution levels and excessive use of gadgets. Blink as often as possible and gaze at longer distances from time to time.

Opt for lubricating eye drops or anti-glare specs as prescribed by the doctor to keep your eyes safe and healthy. To remain on the safe side, one should take simple precautions for about three-seven days post-MICS surgery which include not applying water in the eyes, not rubbing them, staying away from crowded and dusty environments, etc.

With MICS setting new standards in the field of eye-care, giving your eyes the best treatment just got easier!

source”cnbc”

‘Night mode’ (eye strain reduction) could make a return on Nexus devices

Many were upset that ‘Night mode’ went missing on the Nexus 6P and Nexus 5X once the Android Nougat 7.1 beta OTA was installed. After much buzz about the omission of Night mode, Ian Lake from Google spoke about why the feature went missing: “it requires driver support that is no present on Nexus devices,” This was about a couple of weeks ago.

“Night Light” feature from Google PixelMany users submitted feedback for the beta (as this is what the program is meant for), and many of them reported the lack of night mode as a bug: saying that night mode should be in the settings, but it is not, and that the issue is happening 100% of the time. Google must have heard everyone loud and clear because today someone at Google has marked the issue as “closed” with a status of “FutureRelease”.

This technically means that the issue has been resolved and that the fix for the issue will be applied in a future update. Perhaps Google only removed Night mode because it was inconsistent with the Google Pixel’s “Night Light”, as that’s what it is called on the new phone.

In any case, we expect to see the eye strain reduction feature make its way back to the Nexus 6P and 5X on the Beta program. Thanks Google!

source”gsmarena”

Arthritis Drug May Help Treat Rare Eye Disease: Study

Arthritis Drug May Help Treat Rare Eye Disease: Study

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Arthritis Drug May Help Treat Rare Eye Disease: Study
The popular arthritis medication may help to treat a rare eye disease that can lead to loss of vision.
LONDON: A popular rheumatoid arthritis medication may effectively treat non-infectious uveitis, a rare eye disease that can lead to loss of vision, a new study has claimed.

The drug contains the active agent adalimumab, a therapeutic human monoclonal antibody, researchers including those from Medical University of Vienna said.

“We were able to prospectively demonstrate for the very first time that non-infectious uveitis can also be successfully treated with a cortisol-free medication,” said Talin Barisani-Asenbauer from MedUni Vienna.

“That will significantly improve the management of uveitis patients who have only partially responded to corticosteroids, need a corticosteroid sparing therapy or who are unsuitable for treatment with corticosteroids,” said Barisani-Asenbauer.

“The biologic medication adalimumab has long been used to treat rheumatic diseases and has to be injected subcutaneously every two weeks. For sufferers, steroid-free means there are fewer side-effects, so that it can be used over a longer period of time,” said Barisani-Asenbauer.
Uveitis is the name used for inflammatory conditions of the inner eye, in particular the uvea, which consists of the iris and the ciliary body in the front section and the choroid in the back section.

Inflammation can also affect other parts of the eye, such as the retina and the vitreous body. 70-90 per cent of sufferers are aged between 20 and 60 and are in the middle of their working lives, researchers said.

The first symptoms are floaters in the visual field, blurred vision, visual disturbances and photosensitivity.

Potential complications of uveitis are macular oedema (accumulation of fluid in the retina), glaucoma or cataracts, for example. Uveitis can even lead to loss of vision, they said.

(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

source”cnbc”

Arthritis Drug May Help Treat Rare Eye Disease: Study

Arthritis Drug May Help Treat Rare Eye Disease: Study

LONDON: A popular rheumatoid arthritis medication may effectively treat non-infectious uveitis, a rare eye disease that can lead to loss of vision, a new study has claimed.

The drug contains the active agent adalimumab, a therapeutic human monoclonal antibody, researchers including those from Medical University of Vienna said.

“We were able to prospectively demonstrate for the very first time that non-infectious uveitis can also be successfully treated with a cortisol-free medication,” said Talin Barisani-Asenbauer from MedUni Vienna.

“That will significantly improve the management of uveitis patients who have only partially responded to corticosteroids, need a corticosteroid sparing therapy or who are unsuitable for treatment with corticosteroids,” said Barisani-Asenbauer.

“The biologic medication adalimumab has long been used to treat rheumatic diseases and has to be injected subcutaneously every two weeks. For sufferers, steroid-free means there are fewer side-effects, so that it can be used over a longer period of time,” said Barisani-Asenbauer.
Uveitis is the name used for inflammatory conditions of the inner eye, in particular the uvea, which consists of the iris and the ciliary body in the front section and the choroid in the back section.

Inflammation can also affect other parts of the eye, such as the retina and the vitreous body. 70-90 per cent of sufferers are aged between 20 and 60 and are in the middle of their working lives, researchers said.

The first symptoms are floaters in the visual field, blurred vision, visual disturbances and photosensitivity.

Potential complications of uveitis are macular oedema (accumulation of fluid in the retina), glaucoma or cataracts, for example. Uveitis can even lead to loss of vision, they said..

source”cnbc”

Ataxia mouse model: Eye blink conditioning for early diagnosis of human disease SCA6

Scientists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum established a mouse model for the human disease SCA6. SCA6 is characterised by movement deficits and caused by similar genetic alterations as Chorea Huntington. The mouse model will be used to investigate the disease mechanisms. Experiments suggest that an impairment of eye blink conditioning could be an early disease symptom. The team from the Department of Zoology and Neurobiology published their data in The Journal of Neuroscience; the work was highlighted by the editor’s commentary.

Spinocerebellar ataxia 6: structural changes in a Calcium channel in cerebellar neurons

SCA6 or spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 is a movement disorder, which results in the loss of a special type of neuron in the cerebellum called Purkinje cells. These neurons process sensory information to coordinate movements. The disease has a late onset and develops in the second period of life. Patients are often wheelchair bound and no therapies are available. “To understand, how the disease originates and progresses and to develop new therapeutic strategies, it was important to establish a new mouse model,” says Dr Melanie Mark, a neuroscientist from the Ruhr-Universität Bochum.

Modification of a single protein fragment causes disease symptoms

SCA6 belongs together with Chorea Huntington to the family of polyglutamine diseases. They are characterised by repetitions of the amino acid glutamine in disease specific proteins. The team of Prof Dr Stefan Herlitze used a human Calcium channel fragment from a SCA6 patient containing stretches of glutamine and brought it in cerebellar Purkinje cells of mice. This protein fragment was sufficient to induce SCA6 like symptoms.

Impairment of eye blink conditioning

However, the animals developed other problems before movement deficits. The physiological properties of the Purkinje cells were altered and conditioning learning was impaired. The scientist presented a tone followed by an air puff onto the eye. Healthy animals learn to close their eyelid, when they hear a tone, before the air puff is applied. However animals with the mutated Calcium channel fragment could not learn this association. “The eye blink conditioning is a noninvasive method, which has the potential to be used to detect cerebellar mediated diseases during early stages before disease symptoms such as movement deficits become obvious,” suggests Stefan Herlitze.

source”gsmarena”

Surprise discovery in the blink of an eye

We probably do it every day, but scientists have only just discovered a distinct new way in which we move our eyes.

The team from the University of Tübingen in Germany assessed the eye movements of 11 subjects using tiny wires attached to the cornea and with infrared video tracking. In results published in eLife, they discovered a new type of eye movement that is synchronised with blinking.

The movement they discovered helps to reset the eye after it twists when viewing a rotating object. It is like avoiding tiny rotations of a camera to stabilise the image we perceive. We don’t notice the eye resetting in this way because it happens automatically when we blink.

“We were really surprised to discover this new type of eye movement and it was not what we had anticipated from the experiment,” says lead author Mohammad Khazali.

“We had expected to find that another, already well-known type of eye movement is synchronized to blinking.”

Although it is brief, blinking creates an interruption in our visual perception. We spend up to a tenth of our waking hours blinking but hardly notice it. It serves an essential role in lubricating the eye and may even provide the brain with small, frequent mental breaks.

The scientists sought to investigate whether a reflexive, involuntary eye movement called torsional optokinetic nystagmus (tOKN) occurs at the same time as blinking. The theory was that this reflex also creates a break in the visual system so synchronising them minimises downtime.

The subjects’ eye movements were tracked as they viewed a rotating pattern of dots. As their eyes twisted to follow the dots, they frequently reset, via tOKN, to avoid moving beyond the mechanical limits of the eye muscles. However, this resetting was imperfect and the eyes gradually twisted until the muscles couldn’t twist any more. This varied between subjects from three to eight degrees of rotation.

Once they reached their maximum, the eyes reset so they were no longer twisted at all. This happened at the same time as blinking. The scientists have called this newly-discovered movement blink-associated resetting movement (BARM).

“The eye’s sharpest vision is enabled by a spot on the light-sensitive sheet of the retina called the fovea and this needs to stay balanced to ensure objects of interest can be scrutinised in an optimum way,” says Khazali.

The frequency and size of the movement is determined by how far the eyes have deviated from a neutral position. It helps to reduce strain in the eyes as they move to assess the world around us. In further experiments, the scientists discovered that it even occurs when the eye is not tracking a rotating object.

“To discover such a ubiquitous phenomenon in such a well-studied part of the human body was astonishing to us and we’re very grateful to the volunteers who took part in the study,” says Khazali.

source”gsmarena”