Nearly 1/2 of breast cancer patients have severe treatment side effects, 1 in 20 Indians suffers from depression

Health weekly roundupHealth weekly roundup
This week was packed with some very shocking yet important health news. To ensure that you don’t miss any, we bring you a weekly roundup. Here is this week’s aggregation of the latest news stories on health, fitness and diet.

Insomnia may triple the risk of asthma: Study

Asthma affects approximately 300 million people worldwide, with major risk factors including smoking, obesity and air pollution.

Mother’s cervical bacteria may help prevent premature birth

The presence of bacteria in a woman’s vagina and cervix may either increase the risk of premature birth or have a protective effect against it, researchers say.

Attention parents! Cooking in those aluminium pans may reduce your kid’s IQ

The findings published in journal Science of the Total Environment, indicate that cadmium is neurotoxic in children and causes kidney damage which is linked to cardiovascular deaths and is carcinogenic.

Eating celery, broccoli can improve treatment of breast cancer

The findings indicate that Luteolin, a naturally occurring, non-toxic plant compound that has been proven effective against several types of cancer.

‘Anxiety, depression may up risk of death from cancers’

Higher levels of anxiety and depression may increase the risk of death from certain cancers, scientists have warned.

Nearly half of breast cancer patients have severe treatment side effects

Many women being treated for breast cancer suffer from severe treatment side effects even when they don’t receive chemotherapy, a recent study suggests.

One in every 20 Indians suffers from depression

Indians popped in more anti-depressants than ever before in 2016, indicating perhaps that they are now more open to the idea of seeking help for mental health problems.

Wrongly diagnosed foot injury may cause arthritis, chronic pain

The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Review has highlighted the importance of additional imaging, second opinions for accurate diagnosis and treatment.

Only 1% of R&D funds spent for HIV, TB and malaria: WHO

Investments in health research and development (R&D) are poorly aligned with global public health needs, the World Health Organisation said.

Healthy food may benefit people with HIV, diabetes: Study

Mediterranean diet loaded with fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins and healthy fats for six months may benefit people with HIV and Type 2 diabetes.

Cheap breath test may detect stomach, oesophageal cancers

Scientists have developed a cheap and non-invasive test that can measure the levels of five chemicals in the breath to detect cancers of the oesophagus and stomach with 85 per cent accuracy.

source”cnbc”

Nearly 1/2 of breast cancer patients have severe treatment side effects, 1 in 20 Indians suffers from depression

Health weekly roundupHealth weekly roundup

This week was packed with some very shocking yet important health news. To ensure that you don’t miss any, we bring you a weekly roundup. Here is this week’s aggregation of the latest news stories on health, fitness and diet.

Insomnia may triple the risk of asthma: Study

Asthma affects approximately 300 million people worldwide, with major risk factors including smoking, obesity and air pollution.

Mother’s cervical bacteria may help prevent premature birth

The presence of bacteria in a woman’s vagina and cervix may either increase the risk of premature birth or have a protective effect against it, researchers say.

Attention parents! Cooking in those aluminium pans may reduce your kid’s IQ

The findings published in journal Science of the Total Environment, indicate that cadmium is neurotoxic in children and causes kidney damage which is linked to cardiovascular deaths and is carcinogenic.

Eating celery, broccoli can improve treatment of breast cancer

The findings indicate that Luteolin, a naturally occurring, non-toxic plant compound that has been proven effective against several types of cancer.

‘Anxiety, depression may up risk of death from cancers’

Higher levels of anxiety and depression may increase the risk of death from certain cancers, scientists have warned.

Nearly half of breast cancer patients have severe treatment side effects

Many women being treated for breast cancer suffer from severe treatment side effects even when they don’t receive chemotherapy, a recent study suggests.

One in every 20 Indians suffers from depression

Indians popped in more anti-depressants than ever before in 2016, indicating perhaps that they are now more open to the idea of seeking help for mental health problems.

Wrongly diagnosed foot injury may cause arthritis, chronic pain

The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Review has highlighted the importance of additional imaging, second opinions for accurate diagnosis and treatment.

Only 1% of R&D funds spent for HIV, TB and malaria: WHO

Investments in health research and development (R&D) are poorly aligned with global public health needs, the World Health Organisation said.

Healthy food may benefit people with HIV, diabetes: Study

Mediterranean diet loaded with fresh fruits and vegetables, lean proteins and healthy fats for six months may benefit people with HIV and Type 2 diabetes.

Cheap breath test may detect stomach, oesophageal cancers

Scientists have developed a cheap and non-invasive test that can measure the levels of five chemicals in the breath to detect cancers of the oesophagus and stomach with 85 per cent accuracy.

Protein can cut progression of both inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer: Study

A new study finds that altering the shape of a protein can significantly reduce the progression of inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer.

Children exposed to complications at birth are at risk of autism, study finds

A study by Kaiser Permanente found that children who were exposed to complications shortly before or during birth, including birth asphyxia and preeclampsia, were more likely to develop autism spectrum disorder.

source”cnbc”

Enhanced Libido FromDAA Pure side effects For The Energized Male

When you are trying to find out the best way to boost the testosterone within your body, you must look towards the aspartic acids. The D-AA is one such booster of testosteroneThis helps in elevating the level of testosterone and then the level goes back to normal after a certain time period. The reason why men search for such supplements is also natural. The human body finds a low level of such hormone from after the age of 30. The body starts accumulating fat and gets less sleep. One finds that male human loses the muscle recovering ability and potential of generating more muscle mass after a certain age.

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Level of testosterone

These ailments can be diminished by natural testosterone production by the body with help of D-Aspartic Acid. This is a supplement that has amino acid that is found within the human body. The compound has got a lot of beneficial DAA Pure side effects on the body of a male human. This is effective in getting a higher level of testosterone. It therefore helps the men who are infertile or who needs more muscle for their sports profession. The central brain gives out a few hormones in the blood stream and this compound also helps in building up level of testosterone in the testicles. This elevates the sperm count of the body.

Muscles build up and enhanced energy

The boosting of testosterone also helps in increased muscle build up within the body. A human body gets strong muscles. The testosterone enhancement leads to protein building within the body that gives birth to muscles that are sturdy and free of undesired fat. The D-AA also helps in low cortisol production within the body and thus keeps away abdominal fat build up around the age of 35 years. The energy level of a normal human at this age starts going down but you can gain more energy when you are taking this compound to regularize your testosterone. It gives your body more red blood cells and therefore more oxygen is received by the body organs to work more.

Research on the side effects

This D-Aspartic Acid is being worked on by researchers now and they say that one can get few acne or headache due to the increased level of testosterone. The hormone level of the body becomes higher and this can trigger some side effects. These will stop when the body gets adjusted to the higher level of the hormone in the blood and one will start experiencing increased libido and leaner muscles soon.

Clinically proven compound

You will find men can take D-AA enjoying enhanced vitality. They would also get more fertile and can make their partners happy. There is an increase of hormones named lutheinizing hormone by 33% and testosterone is increased by 40% and this brings in positive mood and better sleep quality for the person. You will also be able to get away from depression or erectile issues and love the new energized you with higher self-worth. The DAA Pure side effects will show when you take the right dosage of this clinically proven alternative compound and you will enjoy the vibes that it brings with it.

The effects of soy and whey protein supplementation on acute hormonal reponses to resistance exercise in men

With protein supplement use by athletes on the rise, a group of researchers expanded upon prior research examining the effects of soy and whey protein supplementation on testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and cortisol responses to an acute bout of resistance exercise. Their study, “The Effects of Soy and Whey Protein Supplementation on Acute Hormonal Reponses to Resistance Exercise in Men” is the 2014 Ragus Award Winner as Best Article from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, the official publication of the American College of Nutrition.

For many resistance-trained men concerns exist regarding the production of estrogen with the consumption of soy protein when training for muscle strength and size. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of soy and whey protein supplementation on sex hormones following an acute bout of heavy resistance exercise in resistance-trained men.

10 resistance-trained men in their early 20s were divided into 3 supplementation treatment groups: (1) whey protein isolate, (2) soy protein isolate, or (3) a maltrodextrin placebo control. No other supplements were allowed. Vegetarians, vegans, or subjects who consumed high-protein diets were excluded from the study. For 14 days, participants would ingest 20g of their assigned supplement at the same time each morning. The participants would then perform 6 sets of heavy resistance squats at 10 reps each using 80 percent of their maximum lifting weight.

“Our main findings demonstrate that 14 days of supplementation with soy protein does appear to partially blunt serum testosterone. In addition, whey influences the response of cortisol following an acute bout of resistance exercise by blunting its increase during recovery. Protein supplementation alters the physiological responses to a commonly used exercise modality with some differences due to the type of protein utilized,” wrote the researchers.


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source”gsmarena”

Botulinum toxin study proves possibility of remote effects

The botulinum toxins are among the deadliest substances on Earth, and two specific toxins — including the popular drug Botox — have multiple uses for treating many neuromuscular conditions, including frown lines, disabling muscle spasms and migraine headaches.

The botulinum toxins cancel nerve signals to the muscles, creating paralysis that can last for months. Given its extraordinary toxicity, doses are typically measured in trillionths of a gram, and targets are carefully chosen to silence only the desired motor nerves.

When Botox and related botulinum drugs entered the market, “the idea was that they are safe to use, they stay where they are injected, and you don’t have to worry about toxin going to the central nervous system and causing weird effects,” says Edwin Chapman, an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and professor of neuroscience at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The concern that this powerful toxin can move beyond the injection site was reinforced in 2009, when the Food and Drug Administration added a prominent warning to prescribing information “to highlight that botulinum toxin may spread from the area of injection to produce symptoms consistent with botulism,” including “unexpected loss of strength or muscle weakness. … Understand that swallowing and breathing difficulties can be life-threatening and there have been reports of deaths related to the effects of spread of botulinum toxin.”

Additionally, physicians have seen puzzling results from treatment, adds Ewa Bomba-Warczak, a doctoral candidate in neuroscience. “In many cases, after an injection for a disabling spasm of neck muscles called cervical dystonia, there is no change in muscle tone but the patient finds relief and is perfectly happy. That result can’t be explained by the local effects.”

In a study published today (Aug. 4, 2016) in Cell Reports, senior author Chapman, first author Bomba-Warczak and colleagues present clear evidence that toxin is moving between neurons in a lab dish.

The study looked at mouse neurons in wells connected by tiny channels that allow growth of axons — the long fibers that neurons use to communicate. In tests of two botulinum toxins, the researchers saw toxin molecules entering the injected cell, as expected.

Once inside a neuron, botulinum toxin cleaves proteins responsible for fusion of chemical containers, known as vesicles, with the plasma membrane. This fusion event releases chemical signals that underlie communication with muscles, and the inability to fuse leads to the temporary paralysis caused by botulinum toxin.

Using antibodies to identify fragments of the damaged proteins, Chapman’s group showed that toxin molecules were moving to nerve cells in wells that had not initially received the harmful molecules. “Every time one fraction of the toxin acts locally (on the first nerve cell it contacts), another fraction acts at a distance,” says Chapman. “It’s unknown how far they travel, which likely depends on the dose of toxin and other factors.”

Co-author Jason Vevea, a UW-Madison postdoctoral fellow, produced videos showing tagged molecules of botulinum toxin moving along the axons connecting neurons.

Botulinum toxins were first described in the 1800s, and have long been a subject of research at UW-Madison. Allergan PLC, which markets four versions of botulinum toxin, reported global Botox sales of nearly $2 billion in 2015.

By finding that toxin molecules don’t always stay where they are injected, Chapman says the Wisconsin study answers a long-standing question about mobility, but raises several more. “We have seen that these toxins enter neurons at the injection site, causing the desired local paralysis, but Ewa and Jason have shown unambiguously the existence of a second entry pathway that takes some of the toxin molecules to other neurons.”

The research, done in a lab dish, removes variables that have plagued similar studies performed in animals, Chapman says. “We wanted to see if we could build an in vitro (in a dish) system that allows direct visualization of this putative movement, in a way that’s simple, easy to interpret, and unambiguous. Do they move, or do they not?”

Chapman wonders about the effects of extraordinarily powerful toxin molecules that travel the neural networks. Local effects have, until now, been deemed the sole effects. But could part of its effects be due to the transported toxin?

These questions could be answered by genetically engineering theClostridium bacteria that make botulinum toxin to alter the toxin’s structure, Chapman says. “We may be in a position to mutate the part of the toxin that attaches to a receptor on the neuron so it can only enter the local pathway, not this new pathway we have described.”

If only the local effects matter for medicine, tomorrow’s versions of this ancient toxin molecule may be able to alleviate symptoms from wrinkles to severe muscle spasms without moving beyond the target neurons.

“I have a hard time imagining that any physician is going to want to inject something they know can move about when they have an option to use something that stays put,” Chapman says. “It’s an exciting prospect, supplanting a $2 billion drug with a safer drug.”


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by University of Wisconsin-Madison. The original item was written by David Tenenbaum.Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

source”cncb”

Butylparaben can have several endocrine disrupting effects

Research suggests that butylparaben — which is used in cosmetics and skin care products such as sunscreen — have more endocrine disrupting effects than previously thought. In a study from the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, researchers have observed endocrine disrupting effects on the development of the reproductive system in rats that are exposed to the compound prenatally. The researchers have found reduced sperm quality as well as changes in the prostate, testicles, ovaries and breast development.

Parabens are used as preservatives in e.g. cosmetics and skin care products such as sunscreen in order to stop bacterial growth. Parabens have been the subject of several scientific studies, because they have long been suspected of having endocrine disrupting effects. The results have led to a ban on the use of some parabens in foods and cosmetics in the EU, while a safety limit has been set for the addition of the compound in various products.

One of the permitted compounds is butylparaben, which previous studies have shown reduces sperm count in male rats that have been exposed to the substance prenatally.

Effects in both males and females

However, in a new study from the National Food Institute, other endocrine disrupting effects have also been found in both male and female rats that have been exposed to butylparaben prenatally.

In addition to reduced sperm quality, other observed effects in male rats included changes to the prostate as well as the testicles’ ability to produce hormones. In female rats the effects included changes in breast tissue and ovary weight.

“Overall, our results suggest that butylparaben has more negative effects on reproductive health than previously thought,” senior researcher Julie Boberg from the National Food Institute says.

Cocktail effects?

Some of the effects were only observed at high doses. However, sperm quality was affected at all studied doses. A very simple comparison shows that humans are exposed to parabens in doses well below what these rats have been exposed to.

In order to understand the importance of these finding for humans, it is not sufficient to simply look at what is applied to the body e.g. through skin lotions. It is also necessary to compare the doses humans have in their bodies with the doses test animals have in their bodies. In this area the researchers are lacking in scientific knowledge.

Therefore, it is important to gather more data on what children and adults are exposed to through skin lotions and cosmetics, and how it is metabolized in the body, Julie Boberg emphasizes.

“We need more knowledge about what it means for humans to be exposed to parabens from skin lotions and cosmetics for example. It is especially important to take account of cocktail effects because people are exposed to many types of endocrine disruptors at the same time over the course of a normal day,” Julie Boberg explains.

Possible impact on regulation

The EU has just put forward criteria for when a compound is considered an endocrine disruptor. As the study from the National Food Institute shows that butylparaben probably has an endocrine disrupting mode of action, this new knowledge about butylparaben may have an impact on how authorities in the future choose to regulate the use of the substance in different products.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Technical University of Denmark (DTU). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. J. Boberg, M. Axelstad, T. Svingen, K. Mandrup, S. Christiansen, A. M. Vinggaard, U. Hass. Multiple Endocrine Disrupting Effects in Rats Perinatally Exposed to Butylparaben. Toxicological Sciences, 2016; 152 (1): 244 DOI: 10.1093/toxsci/kfw07

[“source-gsmarena”]