This is what you should eat after different types of exercise

Eat well afterwards to get the most out of your exercise

Congratulations! You’ve make it through your workout. But the job isn’t done just yet – because if you really want to get the most out of your exercise, you need to put some thought into what you eat afterwards.

And according to Anna-Jane Debenham and Alex Parker, dietitians from nutrition consulting business The Biting Truth, it’s not just about protein.

Although important, particularly for muscle repair, “having protein on its own, although it may seem ‘trendy’, isn’t ideal in a lot of cases”.

Instead, they say snacks containing both carbohydrate and protein will “allow your body to recover and repair effectively”. And don’t forget to replace all those lost fluids (hey, we all get sweaty!) with extra water.

Failing to refuel or rehydrate after exercise can result in a host of problems, including earlier onset of fatigue, reduced speed and endurance, poor concentration and gut upset, Anna and Alex warn. Not to mention the fact you might not be getting the full benefits of all that effort!

Here, they explain why post-exercise nutrition is so important…

Don’t just wait until your next meal to eat

Restricting calories after a workout can be counterproductive, and after the extra strain you’ve put on your body, nutrition is even more crucial.

Anna and Alex explain: “During exercise (especially resistance training), the body shifts towards a catabolic state (muscle breakdown) which then transitions back to an anabolic state (muscle building) within the first few hours of completing your workout.”

Essentially, this means there’s a 60-90 minute “window of opportunity” after your training session, where you have a chance to replenish the stores of carbohydrates in the liver and muscle cells, as well as encourage muscle repair.

What to eat after… cardio

Running, dancing, boxing – all great cardio workouts, and they can leave you seriously pooped. “The key is replenishing carbohydrate stores,” say Anna and Alex, “and adequate hydration is essential.”

They recommend a slice of wholegrain bread with peanut butter and banana: “This snack provides high-quality carbs, protein and heart-healthy fats, and is full of potassium which helps soothe muscles.”

Other snacks you could reach for after a cardio workout include a plain banana, some nuts, or some wholegrain toast with either ricotta and fruit, or cottage cheese and tomato.

What to eat after… strength training

If you’re lifting weights and your goal is to gain muscle, Anna and Alex say: “An energy-rich diet with adequate amounts of protein is just as important as your well-developed strength-training programme.”

So, after strength training, your food intake should be low in fat and high in nutrients. “Consuming carbohydrates in conjunction with protein allows the protein to be used for muscle growth and repair,” they explain.

They recommend smoothies as a great option for fitting in a lot of nutrients in one go – you can just blend up your ingredients (such as berries, low-fat yogurt and/or oats) and you’re sorted.

What to eat after… HIIT

HIIT (high-intensity interval training) is all the rage, hailed as a speedy way to burn more fat and build more muscle compared to traditional workouts. And putting your body well and truly through its paces (no one ever said HIIT was easy) means refuelling well is crucial.

Anna and Alex suggest an onion and pepper omelette plus some fruit, and their top tip is to include pineapple.

“Aside from their protein content, eggs are high in leucine, which triggers muscle protein synthesis,” they explain. “The vitamin C in the capsicums [peppers] is essential for maintaining the healthy cartilage you need to cushion your bones. Research suggests bromelain (an enzyme in pineapple) may help reduce exercise-induced inflammation.”

(Photo: Neville Williams)

What to eat after… stretching and toning-based exercise

What you decide to eat after classes like yoga, Pilates or barre depends on what your fitness goal is: whether you want to lose weight, boost your core strength, or increase your overall muscle mass.

“If your goal is weight loss, then a nutrient rich meal within 60 minutes of your workout is essential, as the meal will be more efficiently digested,” say Anna and Alex. “If your goal is to improve strength, then protein is key.”

They suggest two hard-boiled eggs with multigrain toast, or something like a slice of roast vegetable and feta frittata would be ideal.

To help repair tired muscles and replenish energy stores after yoga, Anna and Alex say: “Your body needs a hit of protein, some low-GI carbohydrates and fruits or vegetables.” Try a small tub of Greek yogurt with a couple of spoonfuls of muesli containing nuts and fruit, or a small can of tuna, four-bean mix and some chopped veggies.

[“Source-liverpoolech”]

Eat mushrooms to prevent risk of Dementia, Alzheimer’s disease

ANI | Jan 25, 2017, 04.30 PM IST

 

<p>Eat mushrooms to prevent risk of Dementia, Alzheimer's disease<br></p>Eat mushrooms to prevent risk of Dementia, Alzheimer’s disease

According to researchers, certain edible and medicinal mushrooms contain bioactive compounds that may enhance nerve growth in the brain and protect against neurotoxic stimuli such as inflammation that contribute to Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

The study, published in Journal of Medicinal Food supports the potential role of mushrooms as functional foods to reduce or delay development of age-related neurodegeneration.

The researchers from University of Malaya in Malaysia discussed the scientific findings related to the health benefits of edible and culinary mushrooms.

It is estimated that as many as 5.1 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease and, worldwide, 42 million cases are expected by 2020.

Despite the advancement of medication, the management of these diseases has remained largely ineffective.

The authors focus on the activity of bioactive components of mushrooms that may offer neuroprotective and cognitive benefits.

“In contrast to the body of literature on food ingredients that may benefit cardiometabolic diseases and cancer, very few studies have focused on food that may benefit neurodegenerative diseases,” explained study author Sampath Parthasarathy from University of Central Florida.

They found that each mushroom increased production of the Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) – a molecule primarily involved in regulating growth, maintenance, proliferation and survival of certain nerve cells in the brain.

“The current study might stimulate the identification of more food materials that are neuroprotective,” Parthasarathy added.

source”cnbc”

What to eat & avoid in PCOS

What to eat & avoid in PCOS
A healthy lifestyle involves many choices. Exercise and eating right is always top-most on that list. As every disease condition has a few do’s and don’ts, choosing the right diet plan depending on your health issues is most important. If PCOS is your new-companion these small but important changes in your eating habits can help in alleviating your symptoms, increasing your energy levels and in maintaining your weight.

Ditch Processed and Refined Food: In PCOS, the crux of eating healthy is to consume food which is low in calories and is preservative free. Consuming food in its most natural state prevents our hormones from going berserk. In order to keep them in check cutting down on processed and refined food helps immensely.

Opt for whole gluten-free grains like oats, brown rice, millet and quinoa instead of white flour, pasta and bread.

Skip the Sugar: Women with PCOS have high insulin levels and eating too much sugar will add to their existing problem. Not only that, it also makes losing weight more difficult. Eating fewer sugars and simple carbohydrates can help you lose weight and reduce your risk for diabetes. Avoid sweetened juices, cakes, cookies, sodas and those delectable desserts in your refrigerator.

Opt for food that has natural sugars like fruits, jaggery, honey and dates instead of artificial sugar.

Limit the Liquor: Alcohol consumption increases the risk of developing PCOS by 50% and adds to the hormonal imbalance by upping the oestrogen levels. Apart from that alcohol gets converted to sugar immediately in our body, thereby raising the already high blood sugar levels even further. So alcohol is definitely a no-no as far as PCOS is concerned.

If you feel like letting your hair down and a drink is a must, limit yourself to just one glass of wine once in a while.

Stay Away From Salt: One teaspoon of salt contains more than a day’s requirement of Sodium and high sodium leads to excessive water retention in our body. Women suffering from PCOS have a lot of water retention anyway, so excessive salt adds to their problem. S

Stay clear of salty snacks through the day. Opt for nuts, fruits instead. Not only does it give you the important nutrients but also helps you keep your sodium levels under control.

Up Your Intake of Veggies and Fruits: Vegetables and fruits are packed with a lot more nutrients per calorie than any other food. Most fruits and veggies are rich in iron, calcium, potassium and magnesium. They also have ample of vitamin K, C, E and many of the B-complex group. All these are known to help in reducing PCOS symptoms.

Though medical intervention is an absolute necessity in PCOS, these small but important changes in your daily dietary intake can help you increase your energy and help maintain your weight.

To know more about PCOS and its symptoms, causes, complications and Homeopathic Treatment visit https://www.welcomecure.com/diseases/Polycystic-ovary-syndrome-PCOS/overview

Disclaimer: This article is written by our Sponsor and we do not take any responsibility for the accuracy of their views. This should not be considered as a substitute for Physician’s advice. Please consult your treating Physician for more details.

source”cnbc”

How The Food We Eat Makes Climate Change Worse

How The Food We Eat Makes Climate Change Worse

ROME: The way we produce and eat food must change urgently both to cut the amount of planet-warming emissions produced by agriculture, and to help farmers adapt to climate change, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said on Monday.

Without swift action, climate change will put millions of people at risk of hunger and poverty, the UN agency said in a report to mark World Food Day on October 16.

Here are some key facts:

1. Agriculture, forestry and changes in land use combined are the second largest source of greenhouse gases, producing 21 percent of global emissions. The top emitter is the energy sector at 47 percent.

2. To feed a growing global population, agricultural production must rise by about 60 percent by 2050.

3. Climate change is expected to cut harvests in developing countries in the long term – although it may also improve some crop yields in the short term.

4. If climate change continues unchecked, it will make an additional 42 million people vulnerable to hunger in 2050, according to FAO calculations. However, that figure does not include people affected by extreme weather events such as drought or floods.

5. Small farmers, cattle herders and fishermen are the most vulnerable to climate change, and will need better access to technologies, markets, information and credit to adapt to climate change.

6. Agriculture suffered some 25 percent of the total economic losses caused by climate-related disasters in developing countries between 2003 and 2013. For drought-related disasters, the share rose to 84 percent.

7. Livestock alone produces nearly two thirds of agricultural emissions – mainly from animal burping, manure and feed production. Synthetic fertilisers are the next major contributor, producing 12 percent, and rice cultivation 10 percent.
8. Carbon dioxide emissions from agriculture are mainly caused by changes in land use, such as converting forests to pasture or cropland, and land degradation from over-grazing.

9. Most direct emissions of methane and nitrous oxide are caused by livestock flatulence, rice production in flooded fields and the use of nitrogen fertilisers and manure.

10. Nearly 50 percent of world food production depends on nitrogen fertiliser. The other half depends on nitrogen found in soil, animal manure, nitrogen-fixing plants, crop residues, wastes and compost.

11. More than a third of food produced worldwide is lost or wasted. Rotting food produces methane, which is a greenhouse gas 25 times more potent than carbon dioxide.

12. Deforestation and forest degradation account for about 11 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions, more than the world’s entire transport sector.

13. Reducing agriculture emissions depends partly on cutting food waste and loss, as well as shifting people’s diets – including consuming less animal products – and changing farming practices.

source”cnbc”