Don’t blame Dubai for your hair loss: Celeb surgeon

Hair transplant surgeon Dr. Sajjad Khan busts some myths on hair loss

How many times have you heard your friends and colleagues blaming Dubai for their increased hair loss? They attribute it to the water in the city.

We now have the misconception cleared, thanks to Dr. Sajjad Khan, the celebrity hair transplant surgeon in Dubai to attend his high-profile clients. To his credit, he has the biggest actors in Bollywood, royalty and athletes among his clientele. His website mentions Gulshan Grover, Sanjay Kapoor, singer Abhijeet Bhattacharya and few more but it is the names he shared in confidence during our interview that left us baffled.

Being associated with Dubai for the past two decades, he knows what the reasons for hair loss – and water is not one of them. “I laugh when some of my clients insist on washing their hair with mineral water. It is not required at all. If you have so much money, give it to charity. If the water in Dubai is harsh, it will only make your hair brittle but that could be mended by using a better shampoo and conditioner,” said Dr. Khan.

And that’s not the only myth he busted during the chat he had with City Times.

Dr. Khan goes on to share that a majority of his clients are men who suffer from genetic hair loss. “Men are more prone to balding because of their genetics, but it can be corrected with a good diet and regular exercise. The problem, however, is that if we don’t address the hair loss issue, and don’t seek timely medical help, it may be too late to reverse the damage.”

While hair transplant can be an effective one-time solution, in many cases, regenerative medicine can fix your hair woes. “Great hair starts with a healthy scalp and regenerative treatments can harness the power of your own body’s stem cells to strengthen hair and reduce loss,” Dr. Khan explained.

Hair loss in women

It is not only men, genetics is also responsible for hair loss among women – at least in 50 per cent of the cases.The other 50 per cent is metabolic as women’s bodies go through many changes due to pregnancy or menopause.Special attention should be given to pregnant women’s diets because sometimes, the hair they shed never comes back, Dr. Khan cautioned.

Menopause is a very critical time as 90 per cent of the estrogen levels drop due to the reduction in testosterone levels, he said. It is the imbalance in hormone levels that leads to hair loss.”In these cases, replacement therapy is very helpful as estrogen levels can be restored. If replacement therapy is not an option, regenerative medicine can regenerate hair through your own body stems.”The other common causes of hair loss among women include low hemoglobin levels and thyroid hormone levels. Drastic weight loss (3-4 kg a month) can also lead to hair fall or thinning hair, he said.

Summer care for you hair

During summer, your hair becomes dry due to the heat. The average moisture in hair should be around 8 to 10 per cent and losing it, makes your hair brittle. “In case of extreme temperatures, you could use thermal active heat protectant on your hair. It coats the hair and you don’t risk losing the moisture,” Dr Khan advised. He further stated that ultra-violet rays affect the hair cuticles and weaken them. “You could also mix SPF 30+, oil free sun-screen into your conditioner and apply it to your hair to provide extra protection.”

DO NOT BELIEVE IN THESE HAIR MYTHS

Don’t use conditioner on scalp

The focus, these days, is to make the scalp better, and healthier. If your scalp is not treated right, your hair will never be healthy. Today’s conditioners are conducive for the scalp too and you have to moisturise your scalp.

Opt for sulfate-free shampoos

The notion of using shampoos without sulfate is wrong. Sulphate-free shampoos are not a must, but you must look for milder sulfates.

Go organic

Not all organic hair products are good for your hair. Some sophisticated ingredients are needed for healthy hair and scalp. Organic ingredients cannot provide them. It is necessary to consult a hair expert and opt for the best shampoo by renowned pharma brands.

Scissors matter

Professional hair stylists use top-quality scissors that range (Some costing $200 to $500). The stylist’s scissors must be well-maintained as dull scissors damage hair cuticles and lead to split ends.

Regularly oiling your hair

Hair structure is made up of protein and oils are made of fat. Secondly, your hair needs moisture and oil doesn’t provide any. So, while oiling might help lay flat the cuticle, it is not essential. A good conditioner will do better!

[“Source-khaleejtimes”]

Don’t succumb to temptation, stick to your diet resolutions

Debarati S Sen| TNN | Jan 12, 2017, 01.00 AM IST

Stick to your diet resolution (Thinkstock)Stick to your diet resolution (Thinkstock)
We are well into the second week of the New Year and the topic of ‘are you sticking to your resolutions’ might still be a little early. However, as the year rolls out, this does become a major issue and all goals and aims made in January are forgotten, or slowly fade into the background as priorities change. The trick here is to keep in mind that taking small yet steady steps towards your goal diligently, will definitely help. Dieticians and nutritionists share tips on how to stick to stick to your resolutions in 2017…

Write down your diet goals
This is pretty basic, and unless you actually practice this, you will not realise the power of putting your pen to the paper. Nutritionists say that when you write down your diet goals you actually realise what you are eating though the day. Dietician and sports nutritionist Deepshikha Agarwal says, “These are eye-openers. When you sit down at the end of the day to actually write down all that you ate — you will invariably realise your mistakes and that will help you to stick to your prescribed diet.” According to a study, maintaining a food journal on a daily basis can help you lose excess weight and also maintain it. The study found that participants, who were consistent with their food diary, were able to lose double the weight than those that did not.

Reminders on phone
With busy schedules we might just lose track of our diet. And since we are on our phones most of the time, mobile reminders really work for us. Deepshikha says, “Set a reminder saying ‘have green tea at 4pm’, ‘have a fruit at 11 am’ — these really help you to stick to your diet goal.”

Think through sub-strategies
A resolution to lose weight is not just about eating less. It also encompasses shopping for the right foods, cooking them the correct way, beginning and sticking to an exercise regimen and to avoid binge eating at parties and get-togethers. Dwell on these little sub-strategies first and then you can tackle your main issue much better.

Stock healthy snacks
This is essential, state nutrition experts. Clinical nutritionist Dr Nupur Krishnan says, “Don’t buy unhealthy food items. Stock snacking options like wheat puffs, makhana, roasted jowar, bajra, bhuna chana (iron rich) mumra, black til, chikki (elevates period pain) and a variety nuts and fruits. Use these to deal with mid-meal hunger pangs and to stick to your actual diet resolution.”

Control your mood swings
“Your mood affects your ability to stick to your diet resolution. Stress, negative thoughts, depression will hinder your progress, so listen to good music, get a body massage twice or thrice a week. The endorphins released and the lowering of cortisol levels will help you stay charged up and stick to your resolutions,” says Nupur.

Find yourself a resolution buddy
Choose a friend who you will be accountable to regarding your diet goal. This should be someone who can talk you into sticking to your goal, if and when you stray. Studies have found that people who wrote their goals and then reported their weekly progress and updates to their resolution buddy, were successful in reaching their goal around 70 per cent of the time.

Do not rush into it
If you have a diet goal that says you need to up your intake of fruits, you can begin by having one fruit every morning and then, after a few days add more fruits to your mid-meal snacks. Experts say this will ensure that you slowly become accustomed to your new diet regime and so, are likelier to follow your goal.

Break down your goals
In order to make your diet resolutions actionable, you need to set goals that are broken down to short-term, smaller steps. Choose a long-term goal, then pick one that is achievable in the next three months, and then break that into smaller goals that would take just a week to achieve. Finally, break that down into little steps that you could accomplish every day!

Reassess goals regularly

Once a month examining what all you have done to achieve your goals, always helps. Set alerts and them follow up.

Treat yourself

Last but not the least, this is a tip that can help you stick to your resolution, longer. Deepskhikha says, “When you follow your prescribed diet diligently for a week, then, on a Sunday, treat yourself to a special lunch. This rewarding can egg you on to stick to your routine through the week.”

source”cnbc”

Don’t succumb to temptation, stick to your diet resolutions

Stick to your diet resolution (Thinkstock)Stick to your diet resolution (Thinkstock)
We are well into the second week of the New Year and the topic of ‘are you sticking to your resolutions’ might still be a little early. However, as the year rolls out, this does become a major issue and all goals and aims made in January are forgotten, or slowly fade into the background as priorities change. The trick here is to keep in mind that taking small yet steady steps towards your goal diligently, will definitely help. Dieticians and nutritionists share tips on how to stick to stick to your resolutions in 2017…

Write down your diet goals
This is pretty basic, and unless you actually practice this, you will not realise the power of putting your pen to the paper. Nutritionists say that when you write down your diet goals you actually realise what you are eating though the day. Dietician and sports nutritionist Deepshikha Agarwal says, “These are eye-openers. When you sit down at the end of the day to actually write down all that you ate — you will invariably realise your mistakes and that will help you to stick to your prescribed diet.” According to a study, maintaining a food journal on a daily basis can help you lose excess weight and also maintain it. The study found that participants, who were consistent with their food diary, were able to lose double the weight than those that did not.

Reminders on phone
With busy schedules we might just lose track of our diet. And since we are on our phones most of the time, mobile reminders really work for us. Deepshikha says, “Set a reminder saying ‘have green tea at 4pm’, ‘have a fruit at 11 am’ — these really help you to stick to your diet goal.”

Think through sub-strategies
A resolution to lose weight is not just about eating less. It also encompasses shopping for the right foods, cooking them the correct way, beginning and sticking to an exercise regimen and to avoid binge eating at parties and get-togethers. Dwell on these little sub-strategies first and then you can tackle your main issue much better.

Stock healthy snacks
This is essential, state nutrition experts. Clinical nutritionist Dr Nupur Krishnan says, “Don’t buy unhealthy food items. Stock snacking options like wheat puffs, makhana, roasted jowar, bajra, bhuna chana (iron rich) mumra, black til, chikki (elevates period pain) and a variety nuts and fruits. Use these to deal with mid-meal hunger pangs and to stick to your actual diet resolution.”

Control your mood swings
“Your mood affects your ability to stick to your diet resolution. Stress, negative thoughts, depression will hinder your progress, so listen to good music, get a body massage twice or thrice a week. The endorphins released and the lowering of cortisol levels will help you stay charged up and stick to your resolutions,” says Nupur.

Find yourself a resolution buddy
Choose a friend who you will be accountable to regarding your diet goal. This should be someone who can talk you into sticking to your goal, if and when you stray. Studies have found that people who wrote their goals and then reported their weekly progress and updates to their resolution buddy, were successful in reaching their goal around 70 per cent of the time.

Do not rush into it
If you have a diet goal that says you need to up your intake of fruits, you can begin by having one fruit every morning and then, after a few days add more fruits to your mid-meal snacks. Experts say this will ensure that you slowly become accustomed to your new diet regime and so, are likelier to follow your goal.

Break down your goals
In order to make your diet resolutions actionable, you need to set goals that are broken down to short-term, smaller steps. Choose a long-term goal, then pick one that is achievable in the next three months, and then break that into smaller goals that would take just a week to achieve. Finally, break that down into little steps that you could accomplish every day

source”cnbc”

Fats don’t make you fat!

Fats don’t make you fat!Fats don’t make you fat!
Donal O’Neill is an independent documentary filmmaker, who has covered wide arrays of topics related to health and fitness from last six years in his documentaries. Coming from sports family background with no bad habits, bewildered him seeing his loved ones becoming victims of modern diseases. This made him dig deep in to the limitations of medical industry.

Donal’s debut feature length documentary ‘Cereal Killers’ focuses on unhealthy breakfast cereals, which has replaced traditional foods around the globe. Cornflakes were created by mistake, and the reasons to sell them have detrimental repercussions. He adds, “I look at food like ghee in India and sacred foods from other cultures, which have been unfortunately displaced by modern marketing techniques and artificial options like vegetable oil or sunflower oil. We are losing the touch of wisdom from our ancestors, who didn’t need doctors because they never got sick and lived long healthy lives.” Cereals contain high amount of sugar, which is way more than the recommended intake of five teaspoons by World Health Organization.

Nowadays, people prefer cereals in the morning, thinking it’s healthy and takes less time to prepare. But it’s not enough for the body, so they are hungry again in few hours. Instead, a good-fat based meal would solve the problem of overeating. Also, there is a myth to have huge quantities of protein to maintain a healthy diet, but too much can cause some serious damage to the body. Diseases like cancer, osteoporosis and obesity are one of the few issues that are partly caused by high doses of animal protein in certain cases. However, egg is the greatest source of proteins and amino acids. Breakfast is an important meal of the day, as it peps up the entire body to function for the next twelve hours. Two to three eggs or vegetables with coconut oil for breakfast are ideal. To understand processed food that claims to be healthy, one must read the ingredients of the product. And, if it has more than one ingredient, it’s an artificially contrived food like breakfast cereals. All these low fat products have sugars, sweeteners and artificial additives. Imagine having cornflakes, which is high in sugar added with processed low fat milk—a disaster.

Fats are important for the body, but the products all over the world have brainwashed health conscious eaters that fats are bad. According to Donal O’neill fats are good. Especially, fatty acids protect from heart diseases and high blood pressure. And fat doesn’t make you fat! For instance, half bowl of rice with more ghee is much tastier and healthier than full bowl of rice on its own. O’neill says, “People need to understand that fat is not only nourishing, but also much more satiating. Besides fats, protein is the next best option. Whereas, carbohydrates and sugars continually make you hungry, and that’s a big problem today.”

Donal O’neill worked closely with renowned UK’s cardiologist Dr Aseem Malhotra for his documentary ‘The Big Fat Fix’. Before Donal was on his way to India to embolden Stepathlon’s vision about staying healthy and fit, Dr Malhotra just wanted to share one simple message with India—”Move a bit more, move more often, and rest will follow.” During the research, they found out that people who were active, who moved throughout the day lived longer than others who had a sedentary lifestyle. Moreover, Stepathlon did a study on comparison of people then and now. They discovered that men and women who worked throughout the day had a very similar regime to exercises done today; the calorific reward was similar. O’neill adds, “Women use to clean the floors, men use to cut woods in the forest or build things, and they were healthier because it was constant. They didn’t know, they were not thinking about exercise, there were no gyms hundred years ago, people just moved as part of their everyday lives, they were busy doing stuff.”

Cut down rice, and increase vegetable intake. Have more ghee and coconut oil, as it’s filling. Also, coconut flesh is an excellent option. However, doctors and health institutes have scared-off by saying that cholesterol makes a person fat—it’s not true. O’neill adds, “Fat does not make you fat; sugar makes you fat.” Yes, fat does raise the cholesterol. 75 per cent of heart attack, cardiac arrest victims have regular, normal cholesterol levels. As Dr Malhotra says, “We have been looking at it the wrong way.” Coconut is the best component to raise your good cholesterol. Pharmaceutical companies spend billions of dollars trying to create a drug to do what a coconut does to cholesterol levels. No one can beat nature.

It is a common practice in India to drink tea or coffee with lots of sugar in it. Imagine the amount of sugar lurking inside the processed foods. Even, to create sugar, the whole process to crystallize it takes away all the vitamins, minerals, enzymes and fibre. In fact, sugary drinks increases hunger pangs and raise blood sugar levels. Not only sugar influences energy levels in the body, but also fizzles out quickly. It’s definitely not a long run option. O’neill asserts, “Coconut water will not do what sugar does to your body. Look over your shoulders for answers. Indian food is sacred.”

For O’neill India is a food paradise. He can’t believe that traditional options like ghee and coconut have been pushed away, and refined foods have taken the centre stage just like anywhere in the world today. It’s sad that India too is leading in to development of Type 2.

Movement is important; it should be part of the lifestyle. Getting up and moving around at least every 45 minutes is a better option than relying on exercises alone. Science has proven that people who move around constantly are healthier than people who exercise, but don’t move around at all. Follow simple activities like getting a glass of water or going to the bathroom.

Education is also depends on good health. A healthy child will perform better than an unhealthy child. O’neill suggests, “If we tell children to drink coconut water before soft drinks that will be tremendous step forward, but parents must lead by example. Concentration of children is very important, sugary and starchy products won’t help with that, but traditional foods absolutely will!” Natural fats like ghee, butter, coconut oil and olive oil, followed by protein—fish, meat and chicken are good sources of rich food. Vegetarians need not worry, as nuts will do the needful to maintain good health, apart from beans, pulses and chickpeas. One gram of protein per kilogram of the body weight is sufficient. Since protein supplements have artificial sweeteners, it’s not an ideal health drink.

O’neill concludes, “Rice and rotis are staple foods in India. Similarly, in Ireland, our staple food is potatoes, which never made someone ill hundred years ago. It is when you start adding processed foods like soft drinks, sugars or breads in to your diet, which adds up to marginal little things to a bad performance within the body. To turn that around you can take small steps to improve your health. Rice is not a nourishing food, but if you take a smaller portion of rice with vegetables cooked in coconut oil or ghee would do the trick.

source”gsmarena”

Tested: This all-AMD $650 PC proves VR-ready rigs don’t have to be expensive

amd pc hero 2

Experiencing virtual reality will blow your mind, but it’ll also demolish your wallet. Or at least that’s what people think, and that perception was exacerbated when Oculus’s CEO said that building a Rift setup from scratch will set you back a cool $1,500. Since theOculus Rift itself costs $600, that implies you’ll need a $900 PC to run it. I often hear people say you’ll need to spend about $1,000 on a PC for VR.

Nothing could be further from the truth—and it’s all thanks to AMD.

Team Red trumpeted the arrival of “VR for the masses” with the launch of its Radeon RX 480, a graphics card that revolutionized what’s possible for $200. But the real key to virtual reality on a budget quietly lies in AMD’s affordable processors. FX chips aren’t even mentioned in Oculus Rift’s PC requirements, but many of them indeed power VR experiences, and for far less cost than the Intel Core i5-4590 ($195 on Amazon) Oculus recommends.

To drive the point home, AMD designed a VR-ready DIY PC whose hardware costs a mere $650(ish), with the FX-6350 andRadeon RX 480 as its cornerstones. And then they offered to send it to us for review to verify that it’s indeed capable of engulfing you in digital worlds without barf-inducing frame rate compromises.

Of course we said yes. Let’s dig in.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Meet AMD’s $650 VR PC
  • Testing AMD’s affordable VR PC
  • Dissecting the build
  • Bottom line

Meet AMD’s $650 VR PC

Here are the specs for the rig before we dive into analysis. (AMD really likes Corsair! Though we do too, if PCWorld’s dedicated graphics card test system is any indication.)

  • FX-6350 with Wraith cooler ($118 on Amazon with AMD stock cooler, or $130 onNewegg with Wraith)
  • Radeon RX 480 4GB ($200 on Newegg)
  • Gigabyte GA-970-Gaming SLI motherboard ($99 on Amazon)
  • Corsair Vengeance (2x4GB) DDR3-1866 memory ($43 on Amazon)
  • Corsair Force LE 240GB SSD ($65 on Amazon)
  • Corsair CXM 550W Bronze ($54 on Amazon)
  • Red and white Corsair Spec-Alpha case ($80 on Newegg)

Add it all up and you’ve got a grand total of $659 as of September 6. Pricing for PC parts fluctuates regularly—we’ve seen the cost of this rig vary from $649 to $680 while we’ve had it for testing—but AMD’s definitely fair to call this build a $650 PC.

That glosses over a few very real points, however.

radeon rx 480 2

Brad Chacos

First of all, Radeon RX 480s simply don’t exist at AMD’s ballyhooed $200 price point. Reference models of the 4GB RX 480 disappeared immediately after launch, and all 4GB RX Radeons have been in short supply since. The most affordable version online is the Sapphire Nitro+ RX 480 at $230 on Newegg, and it pretty much hasn’t been in stock since we reviewed it. XFX’s $240 Radeon RX 480 with a custom backplate is the cheapest card you can actually buy on Newegg right now. Your best bet is to useNowInStock.net to track which models are available at any given time. In reality, you’re more likely to spend closer to $250 on a 4GB Radeon RX 480.

You’ll also need Windows, since neither the Oculus Rift nor the HTC Vive support Linux yet. Sure, Microsoft lets you install and use Windows 10 without a product key, but you’ll still need to buy a license and activate it to be legal. That’ll cost you another $110, bringing the grand total for this PC closer to $800 in real life, assuming you already have a keyboard, mouse, and monitor on-hand—still a relative steal for a VR-ready machine. And we’ll get into ways to shave more pennies off the total after looking at how this rig actually runs.

Before we dive into performance results, here’s a nifty AMD-made video of FX PR manager Jason De Vos building a digital version of this very rig in VR.

I wish cable management was this effortless in real life—though the AMD employee who built this PC did his damnedest to make it seem so.

amd pc interior

Brad Chacos

That’s pretty good for a low-cost PC! But I’m getting distracted.

Testing AMD’s affordable VR PC

I tested the chops of AMD’s DIY VR PC using the $800 HTC Vive and an array of virtual reality games. Before I slipped the headset on, however, I ran Valve’s SteamVR performance test on the system. Neither Oculus nor HTC officially support the FX-6350 and I feared I’d be transported into a juddering digital world of dropped frames that would instantly spur Exorcist-style vomiting.

amd vr pc steamvr test

I had nothing to worry about. AMD’s machine falls firmly into the VR-ready range despite its humble cost. Satisfied, I slipped the Vive over my head.

And instantly found myself immersed in new realities.

HARDCORE HARDWARE
Hardcore Hardware: HTC’s Vive has made me a VR believer

I marveled as the Millennium Falcon swooped mere feet above my head in Star Wars: Trial on Tatooine. I gasped as a gigantic, majestic whale almost swiped me with its tail intheBlu. I braved yawning chasms in Everest VR. Audioshield’s frenetic action left me literally feeling the music—and physically wrecked. Petting and playing fetch with The Lab’s cute robo-dog proved curiously satisfying, while Elite: Dangerous’ impressive universe became downright awe-inspiring armed with the Vive and HOTAS flight stick.

Through it all, AMD’s DIY rig delivered a rock-solid virtual reality experience free of jarring frames drops and stuttering, no matter how quickly I whirled my head around or how hot and heavy the onscreen action became. I experienced some very slight hitching the first time I played fetch with The Lab’s dog, but was never able to reproduce it. Experiencing VR with AMD’s $650 PC feels great, full stop.

Most of the first wave of VR games lean more heavily on GPUs than CPUs, though, and the Radeon RX 480 is a relative beast. If there’s a weak spot in this build, it’s that affordable but years-old FX-6350 chip. So I leaned on it.

To do so I created some truly fantastic contraptions in Fantastic Contraption. The game’s indeed fantastic—wondrous, even—but more importantly for our purposes, it’s a game rife with physics-based interactions that need to be handled by the processor. To test the FX-6350’s limits, I spawned a slew of wheels and sticks and balloons and more, cobbled them together like some sort of cartoonish Frankenstein, and set the monstrosity in motion while I whipped my head around.

It didn’t deliver the game’s floating jelly ball to its pink goal. But it ran flawlessly. Like I said: Experiencing virtual reality with AMD’s $650 PC feels great.

Dissecting the build

So AMD’s $650 VR-ready PC does what it sets out to do, and thanks to the color coordination between the Corsair Spec-Alpha case, the Gigabyte motherboard, and Radeon’s own red branding, it manages to look damned finewhile  doing so. I wouldn’t change much about it, frankly.

amd pc interior 2

Brad Chacos

But if sticking to that $650 price matters more to you than aesthetics, you can reclaim some of the budget eaten up by the unexpectedly high street pricing for the Radeon RX 480.

  • I personally enjoy the angular “gamer aesthetic” of the $80 Spec-Alpha case, but using something like Corsair’s own Carbide Spec-01 ($48 on Amazon) would save you $30. That alone could compensate for the extra RX 480 cost, depending on which model of the graphics card you manage to snag.
  • If you have a spare hard drive already hanging around, opt for a 120GB SSD like the OCZ Trion 150 ($45 on Amazon) as a boot drive rather than the $65, 240GB Corsair model AMD recommends.
  • You can save $10 on the memory by choosing Kingston’s 2x4GB HyperX Fury kit ($36 on Amazon) instead.
  • The Gigabyte GA-970-Gaming motherboard’s color scheme looks great inside the Spec-Alpha, but you can find a ton of decent AM3+ motherboards for around $50. If you shop around, just make sure your replacement meets the requirements of the VR headset you plan on using—namely, the Oculus Rift requires a pair of available USB 3.0 ports.

If you find a $200 Radeon RX 480 and follow the tweaks above you could conceivably drive the final cost of the PC down to $550 or so before a Windows license. That’s almosthalf the cost of the $1,000 many people cite for a VR-ready PC. Hot damn.

Two areas I wouldn’t suggest changing out are the heart of AMD’s $650 VR PC build: The processor and graphics card. Not only are they central to the smooth VR experience of this rig, but messing with either would undermine its core principles.

Graphics card-wise, the cheaper but less capableRadeon RX 470 and 3GB GeForce GTX 1060 aren’t satisfying virtual reality options, full stop. You can always splurge for a more potent card than the Radeon RX 480, but that flies in the face of crafting a budget build. On the processor side, the $118 FX-6350’s an aging favorite of price-conscious PC gamers, but you’d need to spend a lot more to upgrade to a more powerful Intel system. Intel CPUs that cut the mustard for VR start at $180 on Amazon, and Intel Core-compatible motherboards cost much more than their AMD AM3+ rivals, too. Simply put, Intel would shatter the budget of this budget build.

Then again, if you’re planning on buying a $600 to $800 VR headset, spending a bit more for additional future-proofing may be worthwhile to you. That’s up to you and your wallet.

Bottom line

amd pc hero

Brad Chacos

But forget about cobbling together a whole PC.

The most exciting part of this whole endeavor was discovering that yes, despite being a bit long in the tooth and nowhere near as powerful as Intel’s Core i5 processors in a vacuum, the people’s champion FX-6350 is utterly capable of handling virtual reality workloads. That may change in the future if CPU-intensive AAA games descend on the Vive and Rift in droves—though DirectX 12’s expanded multi-core capabilities could help on that front, as the FX-6350 packs six cores.

AMD powers about a quarter of all PCs connected to Steam, and chips like the FX-6350 and FX-8350 ($146 on Amazon) are beloved by PC gamers on a budget. This system proves not only that VR-ready PCs can be built for significantly less than most people think, but that a horde of FX-packing PC gamers are just a $200 Radeon RX 480 graphics card upgrade away from being able to experience virtual reality. That’s eye-opening.

source”gsmarena”

Many top selling sunscreens don’t offer adequate protection

About 40 percent of the top selling sunscreens on Amazon.com don’t meet the American Academy of Dermatology’s guidelines for sunscreens. This was largely due to a lack of water or sweat resistance, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study.

The study also found consumers spend up to 3,000 percent more for products that provide the same sunscreen protection as lower-cost sunscreens.

Northwestern investigators wanted to identify high performing products that are affordable and popular to know what to recommend to their patients and, hopefully, increase the likelihood of their using it.

Sunscreen use is low for adolescents and adults. And, if they do wear sunscreen, they don’t use enough or apply it frequently enough. Cost and “cosmetic elegance” of the product — how it feels on the skin, color or scent — may be factors.

“We are often asked to recommend sunscreens, and we wanted to know what consumers prefer,” said lead study author Dr. Steve Xu, a resident in dermatology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “This way we are suggesting popular products they will actually use that will protect them.”

“You don’t want to wear a chalky, greasy, terrible-smelling product, even if your dermatologist recommends it, ” Xu said. “This gave us insight into what consumers prefer, so it can guide our recommendations and be cost conscious.”

Xu said he was surprised at the 3,000 percent difference in price for products that provided basically the same protection.

To identify the most popular sunscreens, investigators looked at the top rated 1 percent of the 6,500 sunscreens with four or more stars sold on Amazon.com. They came up with the 65 top-rated products. The goal was to identify high performing products that are affordable and popular to encourage adherence to sunscreen use.

Their median price was $3.32 an ounce; median SPF was 35; 92 percent had broad-spectrum coverage claims and 62 percent were labeled as water or sweat resistant. The cheapest sunscreen was 68 cents an ounce and the most expensive was $24 an ounce.

The study was published July 6 in the journal JAMA Dermatology.

Sunscreens are particularly important for individuals with certain dermatological conditions such as transplant patients who have photosensitive skin due to the drugs they must take or individuals with certain dermatological conditions, Xu said.

“Dermatologists should have a voice in consumer choices when it comes to skin health, a voice that takes the patients’ best interests at heart and is not influenced by marketing claims,” Xu said.

[“source-gsmarena”]

Don’t chase the emerging market rally yet: UBS strategist

Emerging market equities are outperforming stocks in developed economies this year, but the trend could be short lived, Geoff Dennis, head of global emerging market equity strategy at UBS, warned on Wednesday.

Since late January, emerging market stocks have rallied about 15 percent as the dollar has weakened and commodity prices have rebounded, Dennis noted.

But UBS is not expecting the greenback to remain persistently weak, and does not think emerging market currencies have bottomed.

“This is just a temporary trend, so we’re not really chasing this rally aggressively in emerging markets,” Dennis told CNBC’s “Squawk Box.””In fact we’ve had a number of these rallies and then big selloffs in the last five years, and I think this is just another one of those.”

In dollar terms, emerging equities have fallen by 31 percent, with earnings per share down 29 percent, over the course of the last five years through 2015, according to UBS research. In that same period, the trade-weighted dollar index is up 33 percent.

While dollar weakness can provide a boost to emerging market stocks, the real trigger is improved earnings, Dennis told CNBC.

“I think what the markets have done in the last few weeks is assume the global economy is OK, and no major central bank will ever raise interest rates again, whereas it’s very clear at some point the Fed’s going to come back on the scene, and when that happens, the dollar is going to go back up against emerging market currencies,” he said.

In order to continue outperforming, emerging markets need a “Goldilocks”‘ scenario in the United States with weak but not too weak growth, and little to no additional interest rate hikes following the Fed’s initial 25-basis point increase from near zero in December, Dennis said.

More likely there is more weakness to come in key currencies, including the Brazilian real and the South African rand, he said.

UBS does believe the dollar will fall toward 1.16 against the euro on the view there is a greater chance that positive growth surprises will emerge in Europe than in the United States.

[“source-gsmarena”]

Don’t panic about market volatility: Jack Bogle

Don’t panic and don’t worry about calling a bottom, Jack Bogle, founder of the Vanguard Group, told CNBC’s “Power Lunch” on Wednesday.

Bogle told CNBC in January that investors should stay the course in this volatile market. While he said Wednesday that there are no guarantees in the stock market, he urged investors to not exit the market when it’s down, noting that’s “been [his] winning strategy.”

After intense volatility in the past month, stocks were higher Wednesday aiming for a three-day winning streak. The Dow Jones industrial average, S&P 500 and the Nasdaq on Wednesday were on pace for the biggest three-day gain since August 2015’s market turmoil.

In terms of asset allocations, Bogle advises that individuals have a 60 percent to 40 percent stock-to-bond ratio.

“If you’re younger, a lot higher, if you’re older … somewhat lower,” he told “Power Lunch.”

U.S. Treasury yields were all higher Wednesday. The 10-year yield, which moves inversely to the bond’s price, climbed to 1.8364 percent, after closing at 1.777 percent on Tuesday.

For risk averse investors who may not want to invest mostly in stocks, Boggle suggests that they look very, very long term.

“In the long term, stocks are going to do better than bonds, almost inevitably,” he said Wednesday.

— CNBC’s Jenny Cosgrave and Christopher Hayes contributed to this story.

[“source -pcworld”]