I Tried A Diet And Fitness Plan Based On My DNA And Couldn’t Believe The Results

 My name is Daysha, and I have always struggled with my weight.

Growing up, my weight fluctuated a lot. At one point in my life, I developed disordered eating habits. After recovering and practicing a lot of self-love, I found the problem then became that I never saw the same results that I did when I was starving myself.

It’s not that I don’t enjoy working out and eating healthy, because I do.

I love cooking healthy meals and I dance four to five times per week. I have always been frustrated with why it's so hard for me to lose weight. I tried all sorts of methods to lose weight and get fit, including a raw vegan diet, Weight Watchers, seeing a dietitian, doing a soup cleanse, P90X, and even getting a personal trainer. Nothing seemed to work for me.

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I love cooking healthy meals and I dance four to five times per week. I have always been frustrated with why it’s so hard for me to lose weight. I tried all sorts of methods to lose weight and get fit, including a raw vegan diet, Weight Watchers, seeing a dietitian, doing a soup cleanse, P90X, and even getting a personal trainer. Nothing seemed to work for me.

I started to believe that maybe it’s just my genetics.

Not ever seeing results discouraged me so much to the point that I wanted to just give up. It turned into a continuous cycle of embarking on a new diet or fitness plan, not seeing any real change after a few months, and then just giving up again.

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Not ever seeing results discouraged me so much to the point that I wanted to just give up. It turned into a continuous cycle of embarking on a new diet or fitness plan, not seeing any real change after a few months, and then just giving up again.

Then I found out about this thing called FitnessGenes and took a DNA test.

FitnessGenes is a genetic testing company that develops personalized fitness and nutrition plans based on an individual's DNA. I met with Dr. Dan Reardon, the CEO/cofounder, and took a DNA test. The results took one month to process. When I finally got them back, I was shocked.

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FitnessGenes is a genetic testing company that develops personalized fitness and nutrition plans based on an individual’s DNA. I met with Dr. Dan Reardon, the CEO/cofounder, and took a DNA test. The results took one month to process. When I finally got them back, I was shocked.

I sat down with Dr. Dan to learn more about my genetics and how my body works. Here’s what I learned:

1. My suspicion was correct. Genetically, I do have a slower metabolism. Dr. Dan described this in scientific terms as an "efficient metabolism," meaning that I store energy more than someone with a fast or "inefficient metabolism." 2. I also have a gene variation for the FTO gene that is linked to a hormone called ghrelin, which controls hunger. My gene variation implies that I am someone who becomes hungry very easily, therefore creating a higher risk of overeating. Dan said that eating small, frequent meals throughout the day to control hunger would be important. 3. I also have a gene variation in the APOA2 gene, indicating that I am sensitive to saturated fats, meaning that it sticks to me more easily! I asked Dr. Dan what foods have saturated fats and he said things like animal products, butter, dairy products, palm oil, and coconut oil. Coconut oil?! I ate so much coconut oil because of how often it's promoted as a healthy oil. No wonder I was having trouble.4. I am someone who would benefit from working out later in the day because my CLOCK gene variations imply that I am a night owl. This made perfect sense because I am definitely not a morning person.5. I am someone who responds well to "high-volume training," meaning high sets and reps of weight training. I always thought that lots of cardio would be the key to losing weight. It turns out that it was going to take a lot of strength training. Dan said that the more muscle I built, the more fat I would burn. 6. I am someone who does not switch from burning carbohydrates to burning fat easily. This would mean that I would need to be eating the right balance of macronutrients: carbs, protein and fat.7. Dan also said that I have a gene variation that indicates I metabolize caffeine slowly. This means that I would benefit by having a cup of green tea about 30 minutes prior to a workout for optimal energy.

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1. My suspicion was correct. Genetically, I do have a slower metabolism. Dr. Dan described this in scientific terms as an “efficient metabolism,” meaning that I store energy more than someone with a fast or “inefficient metabolism.”

2. I also have a gene variation for the FTO gene that is linked to a hormone called ghrelin, which controls hunger. My gene variation implies that I am someone who becomes hungry very easily, therefore creating a higher risk of overeating. Dan said that eating small, frequent meals throughout the day to control hunger would be important.

3. I also have a gene variation in the APOA2 gene, indicating that I am sensitive to saturated fats, meaning that it sticks to me more easily! I asked Dr. Dan what foods have saturated fats and he said things like animal products, butter, dairy products, palm oil, and coconut oil. Coconut oil?! I ate so much coconut oil because of how often it’s promoted as a healthy oil. No wonder I was having trouble.

4. I am someone who would benefit from working out later in the day because my CLOCK gene variations imply that I am a night owl. This made perfect sense because I am definitely not a morning person.

5. I am someone who responds well to “high-volume training,” meaning high sets and reps of weight training. I always thought that lots of cardio would be the key to losing weight. It turns out that it was going to take a lot of strength training. Dan said that the more muscle I built, the more fat I would burn.

6. I am someone who does not switch from burning carbohydrates to burning fat easily. This would mean that I would need to be eating the right balance of macronutrients: carbs, protein and fat.

7. Dan also said that I have a gene variation that indicates I metabolize caffeine slowly. This means that I would benefit by having a cup of green tea about 30 minutes prior to a workout for optimal energy.

Instead of counting calories, I tracked my macronutrients.

Dan said it would be important to have 1,700–1,900 calories maximum per day, since I am someone with a slow metabolism. However, instead of counting calories, which had put me in a negative headspace in the past, I tracked my macronutrients every day using this whiteboard. Macronutrient breakdown Carbohydrates: 40% Protein: 30% Fat: 30% (less than 8% coming from saturated fats, and the main source coming from monounsaturated fats. This would include foods such as almonds, olive oil, avocado, sesame oil, and canola oil.)

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Dan said it would be important to have 1,700–1,900 calories maximum per day, since I am someone with a slow metabolism. However, instead of counting calories, which had put me in a negative headspace in the past, I tracked my macronutrients every day using this whiteboard.

Macronutrient breakdown

Carbohydrates: 40%

Protein: 30%

Fat: 30% (less than 8% coming from saturated fats, and the main source coming from monounsaturated fats. This would include foods such as almonds, olive oil, avocado, sesame oil, and canola oil.)

I learned how to create meals that were delicious and healthy for my body.

The 30-day plan was easy to follow, but it did take a lot of hard work.

I worked out with Dan three to four times per week doing strength training and high-intensity interval training (HIIT). I had two active recovery days and also took a brisk walk every morning. Yes, there were times when I wanted to quit, but I felt stronger and stronger as the time went by. It motivated me even more to continue.

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I worked out with Dan three to four times per week doing strength training and high-intensity interval training (HIIT). I had two active recovery days and also took a brisk walk every morning. Yes, there were times when I wanted to quit, but I felt stronger and stronger as the time went by. It motivated me even more to continue.

I couldn’t have done it without a strong support system.

I was lucky enough to have friends who were invested in me and seeing me succeed. They were even willing to work out with me!

After 30 days, I could not believe the results!

I didn't weigh myself the entire 30 days, because I didn't want to be discouraged by the numbers. Instead, I focused on how I was feeling. I had more energy than I have ever had before! In the end, it really wasn't about the numbers for me. I just wanted to be the healthiest, happiest version of myself.

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I didn’t weigh myself the entire 30 days, because I didn’t want to be discouraged by the numbers. Instead, I focused on how I was feeling. I had more energy than I have ever had before! In the end, it really wasn’t about the numbers for me. I just wanted to be the healthiest, happiest version of myself.

Although I lost weight and body fat, it was never about the numbers for me. I came out of this experience a different person on the inside, and that is what matters to me the most.

This experience allowed me to trust my body more than I ever have. I realized that I was always caught in this mindset that I was somehow "broken," and that nothing would ever work for me. In reality, I just needed to learn more about my body and how I function as an individual. We live in a culture where everyone is trying to tell you what's healthy, and this gave me the peace of mind to know what's actually healthy for my own body. This is only the beginning for me!

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This experience allowed me to trust my body more than I ever have. I realized that I was always caught in this mindset that I was somehow “broken,” and that nothing would ever work for me. In reality, I just needed to learn more about my body and how I function as an individual. We live in a culture where everyone is trying to tell you what’s healthy, and this gave me the peace of mind to know what’s actually healthy for my own body. This is only the beginning for me!

FitnessGenes is offering a 20% discount for BuzzFeed users using code BUZZFEED at checkout. Follow this link.

Special thanks to Granite Gym and Sanctuary Fitness LA for use of their facilities.

[“Source-buzzfeed”]

Smoking cigarettes may change your DNA permanently

Smoking cigarettes may change your DNA permanently (Picture Courtesy-Shutterstock Images)Smoking cigarettes may change your DNA permanently (Picture Courtesy-Shutterstock Images)
Smoking is one of the biggest culprits causing fatal diseases such as cancer and heart disease. But what most of us don’t know is that smoking has the capability to change our genes. Not only that, it is said to have a lasting impact on our DNA. This also goes on to explain why it is held responsible for a host of serious health issues.

Researchers at the US National Institute of Environmental Health evaluated test results of approximately 16,000 people in 16 studies. Dr Normal Edelman, the senior scientific advisor for the American Lung Association said, “The message here is that smoking has an enormous, widespread impact on your genes. Most of it is reversible, but some is not. So if you smoke, you are going to alter your genetic makeup in a way that’s not totally reversible.” There were cases where even after five years of quitting, the genes had not recovered completely – leaving behind genetic footprints.

Talking about these genetic marks, researchers said these marks are caused by methylation, which is the process of alteration of DNA that can either deactivate a gene or alter its function, leading to diseases like cancer.

Roby Joehanes from Hebrew SeniorLife and Harvard Medical School said, “The encouraging news is that once you stop smoking, the majority of DNA methylation signals return to never-smoker levels after five years, which means your body is trying to heal itself of the harmful impacts of tobacco smoking.”

To watch the video, click here: This Is How Smoking Cigarettes Changes Your DNA Foreve

source”cnbc”

Your DNA can tell how many kids you’ll have

Your DNA can tell how many kids you'll have (Getty Images photo)Your DNA can tell how many kids you’ll have (Getty Images photo)
The age at which you will have your first child and the number of kids you are likely to have may be encoded in your DNA, say scientists who found that genetic data can be used to accurately predict our reproductive behaviour.

The study , led by researchers at University of Oxford, includes an analysis of 62 data sets with information from 2,38,064 men and women on the age at which they had their first child and 3,30,000 men and women for the number of children. Until now, reproductive behaviour was thought to be linked to personal choices or social circumstances.

“We also found that women with DNA variants for postponing parenthood also have bits of DNA code associated with later onset of menstruation and later menopause,” said professor Melinda Mills.

The study shows that DNA variants linked with the age at which people have their firstborn are also associated with characteristics reflecting reproduction and sexual development, such as the age at which girls have their first period, when the voice breaks in boys and at what stage women experience their menopause.

source”cnbc”

Timing Of Your First Child May Be Coded In DNA

Timing Of Your First Child May Be Coded In DNA

Timing Of Your First Child May Be Coded In DNA
12 specific areas of DNA sequence are robustly related with the age at which we have our first child
LONDON: If you thought when you would have your first kid strictly depends on your personal choices or social circumstances, think again! Researchers have found that there is also a biological basis for reproductive behaviour.

The study identified 12 specific areas of the DNA sequence that are robustly related with the age at which we have our first child, and the total number of children we have during the course of our life.

“Our genes do not determine our behaviour, but for the first time, we have identified parts of the DNA code that influence it,” said study first author Nicola Barban from the University of Oxford.

The findings are based on an analysis of 62 datasets with information from 238,064 men and women for age at first birth, and almost 330,000 men and women for the number of children.

“For the first time, we now know where to find the DNA areas linked to reproductive behaviour. For example, we found that women with DNA variants for postponing parenthood also have bits of DNA code associated with later onset of menstruation and later menopause,” lead author Melinda Mills, Professor at the University of Oxford, said..
Until now, reproductive behaviour was thought to be mainly linked to personal choices or social circumstances and environmental factors.

“One day it may be possible to use this information so doctors can answer the important question: ‘How late can you wait?’ based on the DNA variants,” Ms Mills noted.

The researchers, however, added that having a child still strongly depends on many social and environmental factors that will always play a bigger role in whether or when we have babies.

The study, published in the journal Nature Genetics, showed that DNA variants linked with the age at which people have their firstborn are also associated with other characteristics reflecting reproduction and sexual development, such as the age at which girls have their first period, when the voice breaks in boys, and at what stage women experience their menopause.

The researchers believe that in some cases when the variants are combined, they can be used to predict the probability of women remaining childless.

source”cnbc”

DNA markers hyperlink season of delivery, allergic reaction chance

Researchers on the university of Southampton have determined precise markers on DNA that hyperlinkthe season of birth to danger of allergic reaction in later life.

The season someone is born in affects a extensive variety of things: from threat of allergic disorder, toheight and lifespan. but little is known approximately how a one-time exposure just like the season ofstart has such lasting results.

The Southampton take a look at, published inside the journal allergic reaction, conducted epigenetic scanning on DNA samples from a collection of humans born on the Isle of Wight. They observed thatunique epigenetic marks (particularly, DNA methylation) had been related to season of delivery andnonetheless present 18 years later. The research team become also capable of link those start season epigenetic marks to allergic ailment, for example people born in autumn had an increased chance of eczema in comparison to the ones born in spring. The outcomes were confirmed in a cohort of Dutchkids.

John Holloway, Professor of hypersensitivity and respiratory Genetics on the university and one of theexamine‘s authors, comments: “these are genuinely exciting outcomes. We understand that season ofdelivery has an effect on human beings at some stage in their lives. for example normally, people born in autumn and iciness are at improved danger for allergic diseases consisting of allergies. but, untilnow, we did now not recognize how the results may be so durable.

“Epigenetic marks are connected onto DNA, and can have an impact on gene expression (the method with the aid of which precise genes are activated to produce a required protein) for years, maybe even into the subsequent technology. Our look at has related unique epigenetic marks with season of start and dangerof allergic reaction. however, even as those results have medical implications in mediating in opposition to hypersensitive reaction threat, we aren’t advising changing pregnancy timing.”

Dr Gabrielle Lockett, of the college of Southampton and first writer of the take a look at, provides: “it would sound like a horoscope through the seasons, however now we’ve got scientific proof for the waythat horoscope should work. due to the fact season of delivery impacts so many things, the epigenetic marks observed in this take a look at may also doubtlessly be the mechanism for other seasonallyinspired sicknesses and tendencies too, no longer simply allergic reaction.”

The team say that similarly research is needed to recognize what it’s miles approximately the differentseasons of the yr that results in altered ailment hazard, and whether or not specific variations inside the seasons including temperature, sunlight ranges and diets play a component. extra have a look at is also wanted on the relationship between DNA methylation and allergic disease, and whether otherenvironmental exposures also modify the epigenome, with ability sickness implications.

Repairing DNA damage in the human body

Workers representing the repair system known as nucleotide excision repair (NER), repairing DNA and snakes, representing proteins that bind DNA at gene promoters, potentially preventing them from doing this.
Credit: Jackie Mostek

UNSW medical scientists have discovered that DNA repair is compromised at important regions of our genome, shedding new light on the human body’s capacity to repair DNA damage.

Repairing damage in DNA from anything that causes a mutation, such as UV radiation and tobacco smoke, is a fundamental process that protects our cells from becoming cancerous.

In the study published in the journal Nature, the scientists analysed more than 20 million DNA mutations from 1,161 tumours across 14 cancer types. They found that in many cancer types, especially skin cancers, the number of mutations was particular high in regions of the genome known as ‘gene promoters’. Significantly, these DNA sequences control how genes are expressed which in turn determine cell type and function.

The researchers showed that the numbers of DNA mutations are increased in gene promoters because the proteins that bind DNA to control gene expression block one of our cell repair systems responsible for fixing damaged DNA. This system is known as nucleotide excision repair (NER) and is one of a number of DNA repair mechanisms that occurs in human cells and the only one capable of repairing damage from UV light.

Lead author of the study Dr Jason Wong, group leader of Bioinformatics and Integrative Genomics at UNSW’s Lowy Cancer Research Centre, said the results provide compelling evidence that increased mutations at gene promoter sites are caused by a compromised NER system.

“What this research also tells us is that while the human body is pretty good at repairing itself, there are certain parts of our genome that are poorly repaired when we sustain damage from mutagens such as UV light and cigarette smoke,” said Dr Wong, who is an Australian Research Council Future Fellow.

“By actively avoiding these harmful environmental factors, we can minimise the number of mutations occurring in our body that can lead to cancer.”

Internationally, scientists have so far identified only one promoter mutation, known as the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene, that definitively contributes to cancer.

“Our study highlights the need for further research on the role of gene promoter mutations in cancer development,” Dr Wong said.

“This may ultimately help doctors to determine why certain cancers develop, enabling them to diagnose cancer earlier and select more tailored treatment therapies for patients.”

“The findings are all the more impressive because they were uncovered using existing and publicly available ‘big data’, simply by asking the right questions,” said study co-author, haematologist and UNSW Associate Professor John Pimanda.

“We didn’t need to spend time and money recruiting patients, investigating their cancers and sequencing their cancer genomes. All of this data was available to researchers on public data sharing platforms.

“The research highlights the returns that can result from investing in bioinformatics and genomics research,” Associate Professor Pimanda said.

The study was supported by the Cancer Institute NSW’s inaugural Big Data, Big Impact Award and the Cure Cancer Australia Foundation, with the assistance of Cancer Australia.

Data analysed in the study has been made publicly available by The Cancer Genome Atlas, the International Cancer Genome Consortium and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute.
[“source -cncb”]

Nucleic Acids (RNA, DNA)

All of the information needed to control and build cells is stored in these molecules.

There are two main types of nucleic acid, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA). Both of these molecules are polymers. They are composed of monomer subunits like the carbohydrates and proteins described previously. The monomers used to build nucleic acids are called nucleotides. The nucleotides are often referred to by the single letter abbreviations A, C, G, T and U. Like all of the monomers described so far, the monomers used to build DNA are similar to each other but are not exactly alike. One of the differences between DNA and RNA is the subset of nucleotides used to build the polymers. DNA contains A, C, G and T while RNA contains A, C, G and U.

Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA)

DNA is composed of two long strings (polymers) of nucleotides twisted around each other to form the spiral or helical structure shown below. The twisted molecules are arranged in a particular manner, with specific nucleotides always found across from each other. The nucleotide containing adenine (A) always pairs with the nucleotide containing thymine (T). Likewise, guanine (G) always pairs with cytosine (C). If you look closely at the graphics below you can see the nucleotide pairs interacting in the middle of the helix. The polymers that form DNA can be extremely long, reaching millions of nucleotides per each individual DNA molecule. The following graphic depicts a short strand of double-stranded DNA. (1)

DNA is located in the nucleus of cells, a structure that will be described in the next section of the site. All of the nucleated cells in the human body have the same DNA content regardless of their function. The difference is which parts of the DNA are being used in any given cell. For example, the cells that make up the liver contain the same DNA as the cells that make up muscles. The dramatically different activities of these two cell types is dependent on the portions of DNA that are active in the cells. DNA is the storage form of genetic information and acts as a blueprint for cells. As we shall see, changes in the sequence of DNA can lead to alterations in cell behavior. Unregulated growth, as well as many of the other changes seen in cancer, are ultimately the result of mutations, changes in the structure of DNA.

 [“source-cancerquest”]