This is what you should eat after different types of exercise

Eat well afterwards to get the most out of your exercise

Congratulations! You’ve make it through your workout. But the job isn’t done just yet – because if you really want to get the most out of your exercise, you need to put some thought into what you eat afterwards.

And according to Anna-Jane Debenham and Alex Parker, dietitians from nutrition consulting business The Biting Truth, it’s not just about protein.

Although important, particularly for muscle repair, “having protein on its own, although it may seem ‘trendy’, isn’t ideal in a lot of cases”.

Instead, they say snacks containing both carbohydrate and protein will “allow your body to recover and repair effectively”. And don’t forget to replace all those lost fluids (hey, we all get sweaty!) with extra water.

Failing to refuel or rehydrate after exercise can result in a host of problems, including earlier onset of fatigue, reduced speed and endurance, poor concentration and gut upset, Anna and Alex warn. Not to mention the fact you might not be getting the full benefits of all that effort!

Here, they explain why post-exercise nutrition is so important…

Don’t just wait until your next meal to eat

Restricting calories after a workout can be counterproductive, and after the extra strain you’ve put on your body, nutrition is even more crucial.

Anna and Alex explain: “During exercise (especially resistance training), the body shifts towards a catabolic state (muscle breakdown) which then transitions back to an anabolic state (muscle building) within the first few hours of completing your workout.”

Essentially, this means there’s a 60-90 minute “window of opportunity” after your training session, where you have a chance to replenish the stores of carbohydrates in the liver and muscle cells, as well as encourage muscle repair.

What to eat after… cardio

Running, dancing, boxing – all great cardio workouts, and they can leave you seriously pooped. “The key is replenishing carbohydrate stores,” say Anna and Alex, “and adequate hydration is essential.”

They recommend a slice of wholegrain bread with peanut butter and banana: “This snack provides high-quality carbs, protein and heart-healthy fats, and is full of potassium which helps soothe muscles.”

Other snacks you could reach for after a cardio workout include a plain banana, some nuts, or some wholegrain toast with either ricotta and fruit, or cottage cheese and tomato.

What to eat after… strength training

If you’re lifting weights and your goal is to gain muscle, Anna and Alex say: “An energy-rich diet with adequate amounts of protein is just as important as your well-developed strength-training programme.”

So, after strength training, your food intake should be low in fat and high in nutrients. “Consuming carbohydrates in conjunction with protein allows the protein to be used for muscle growth and repair,” they explain.

They recommend smoothies as a great option for fitting in a lot of nutrients in one go – you can just blend up your ingredients (such as berries, low-fat yogurt and/or oats) and you’re sorted.

What to eat after… HIIT

HIIT (high-intensity interval training) is all the rage, hailed as a speedy way to burn more fat and build more muscle compared to traditional workouts. And putting your body well and truly through its paces (no one ever said HIIT was easy) means refuelling well is crucial.

Anna and Alex suggest an onion and pepper omelette plus some fruit, and their top tip is to include pineapple.

“Aside from their protein content, eggs are high in leucine, which triggers muscle protein synthesis,” they explain. “The vitamin C in the capsicums [peppers] is essential for maintaining the healthy cartilage you need to cushion your bones. Research suggests bromelain (an enzyme in pineapple) may help reduce exercise-induced inflammation.”

(Photo: Neville Williams)

What to eat after… stretching and toning-based exercise

What you decide to eat after classes like yoga, Pilates or barre depends on what your fitness goal is: whether you want to lose weight, boost your core strength, or increase your overall muscle mass.

“If your goal is weight loss, then a nutrient rich meal within 60 minutes of your workout is essential, as the meal will be more efficiently digested,” say Anna and Alex. “If your goal is to improve strength, then protein is key.”

They suggest two hard-boiled eggs with multigrain toast, or something like a slice of roast vegetable and feta frittata would be ideal.

To help repair tired muscles and replenish energy stores after yoga, Anna and Alex say: “Your body needs a hit of protein, some low-GI carbohydrates and fruits or vegetables.” Try a small tub of Greek yogurt with a couple of spoonfuls of muesli containing nuts and fruit, or a small can of tuna, four-bean mix and some chopped veggies.

[“Source-liverpoolech”]

Brain appears to have different mechanisms for reconciling sight and sound

A new UCLA psychology study provides insights into how the brain combines sound and vision. The research suggests that there is not one sole mechanism in the brain that governs how much our senses work together to process information.

Among the implications of the study: It might not be as easy as many people had assumed to categorize the way in which we perceive and learn.

“We should be cautious not to make blanket statements about how we process information, like ‘I’m a visual learner,'” said Ladan Shams, an associate professor of psychology in the UCLA College and senior author of the research. “That’s not necessarily true across the board. For example, your brain may combine sights and sounds a lot in one task — watching TV, for example — but only a little in another task — such as playing the piano.”

The researchers found that people’s vision frequently influenced their hearing when they tried to identify the specific location of sounds and flashes of light, and that their hearing influenced vision when they counted the sounds and flashes.

In one part of the study, 59 participants, mostly UCLA undergraduates, were seated in front of a computer monitor with speakers on either side and asked to count the number of flashes of light on the screen and beeps played on the speakers. Sometimes they only saw flashes, sometimes they only heard beeps and sometimes they both saw flashes and heard beeps — in which case the numbers could vary, up to four of each. The researchers presented 360 combinations of beeps and flashes in a one-hour period.

“When people have to process different numbers of beeps and flashes, it’s really hard — the senses blend together,” said Brian Odegaard, a UCLA postdoctoral scholar who was the study’s lead author. “Most people, when presented with two beeps and one flash, mistakenly said they saw two flashes, while a few participants could accurately tease apart lights and sounds.”

Shams explained that most people are pretty good at identifying visual stimuli if no other senses are involved, but in the experiment, what participants saw was typically affected by what they heard.

“When there’s sound, many people get fooled into thinking that there are fewer or more flashes,” she said.

In the second part of the study, subjects were asked to sit facing a black screen, behind which were five speakers. A projector mounted overhead was used to flash bursts of light onto the screen, at the same spots where the speakers were located.

The researchers played brief bursts of sound and triggered flashes of light, in various combinations, and asked participants to identify where they originated. The participants used a computer mouse to point at the part of the screen where they thought the sounds and flashes occurred; each was presented with 525 trials.

When the flash and sound occurred in different locations from each other, most participants struggled to correctly identify where the sound occurred. The effect was similar to what happens when people watch a ventriloquist with a puppet or a magician using misdirection to pull off an illusion, Odegaard said.

Given that the two tasks both involved brief sights and sounds, the researchers figured that the people who were fooled less on one task would be fooled less on the other as well, but the researchers were surprised to find no correlation in how much subjects combined the two senses on the two tasks.

A week later, the participants were given both of the same tasks again. The results were the same –although they performed consistently on each individual task, their abilities to bind the two senses in the two different tests showed no correlation.

The research is published online in Psychological Science, and will be in the journal’s April print edition.

People vary in how much their hearing and vision interact, Shams explained. For example, some find it easier to understand someone who is speaking when they are looking at the speaker. Some are better able, when driving, to estimate how fast other vehicles are traveling using both visual and aural cues.

“This finding suggests that if you find a strategy of combining your senses that helps you perform a given task, stick with it,” she said.

This study was the first to test the same group of people in both a spatial task and counting task. In future research, Shams and Odegaard hope to discover whether we can learn to modify how our brain combines sounds and sights, and if so, how.

[“source -cncb”]

Wayfair CEO to Cramer: Why we are different

At a time when many furniture retailers like Williams-Sonoma andRestoration Hardware are struggling, Jim Cramer turned his attention to Wayfair to see how it could differentiate itself from the competition.

Online retailer Wayfair sells furniture and home goods at bargain prices for brands like Joss & Main, All Modern, Birch Lane and Dwell Studio. However, it seems that regardless of how the company is doing, the stock continues to be a target of short sellers who dismiss its ability to compete against traditional home-goods retailers.

With the stock down more than 16 percent for the year, Cramer spoke with Wayfair’s co-founder and CEO, Niraj Shah, to find out what could be in store for the company.

“Our company was actually profitable for the first nine years, which folks tend to overlook,” Shah said.

Niraj Shah, Wayfair CEO on set of Mad Money with Jim Cramer on Tuesday, March 1, 2016.

Ashlee Espinal | CNBC
Niraj Shah, Wayfair CEO on set of Mad Money with Jim Cramer on Tuesday, March 1, 2016.

Wayfair reported earnings last Thursday, and surprised many investors with a 7-cent earnings loss when Wall Street was expecting a 14-cent loss. It also reported higher than expected revenue, up 81 percent year-over-year, and gave extremely bullish guidance for next quarter.

Read more from Mad Money with Jim Cramer

Cramer Remix: The election stock opportunity
Cramer: Angry politics are hurting this market
Cramer: S&P could be headed for new highs

So, what is the difference between Wayfair and companies like Williams-Sonoma and Restoration Hardware?

“To be fair, both of them play at the very high end of the market. Their products are very expensive, so they’re really not making them affordable,” Shah said.

Shah added that he considers the model of Wayfair to be very different from Restoration Hardware and Williams-Sonoma, as they are traditional inventory players that are store based and have catalog operations. Wayfair’s model is much larger, with a mass business and selection offered for the merchandise that differentiates it.

“If you want to have the thesis that Wayfair doesn’t make sense, you could say that, but I think as you do research you would find that Wayfair is actually a very strong company,” he said.

[“source -pcworld”]

Wayfair CEO to Cramer: Why we are different

At a time when many furniture retailers like Williams-Sonoma andRestoration Hardware are struggling, Jim Cramer turned his attention to Wayfair to see how it could differentiate itself from the competition.

Online retailer Wayfair sells furniture and home goods at bargain prices for brands like Joss & Main, All Modern, Birch Lane and Dwell Studio. However, it seems that regardless of how the company is doing, the stock continues to be a target of short sellers who dismiss its ability to compete against traditional home-goods retailers.

With the stock down more than 16 percent for the year, Cramer spoke with Wayfair’s co-founder and CEO, Niraj Shah, to find out what could be in store for the company.

“Our company was actually profitable for the first nine years, which folks tend to overlook,” Shah said.

Niraj Shah, Wayfair CEO on set of Mad Money with Jim Cramer on Tuesday, March 1, 2016.

Ashlee Espinal | CNBC
Niraj Shah, Wayfair CEO on set of Mad Money with Jim Cramer on Tuesday, March 1, 2016.

Wayfair reported earnings last Thursday, and surprised many investors with a 7-cent earnings loss when Wall Street was expecting a 14-cent loss. It also reported higher than expected revenue, up 81 percent year-over-year, and gave extremely bullish guidance for next quarter.

Read more from Mad Money with Jim Cramer

Cramer Remix: The election stock opportunity
Cramer: Angry politics are hurting this market
Cramer: S&P could be headed for new highs

So, what is the difference between Wayfair and companies like Williams-Sonoma and Restoration Hardware?

“To be fair, both of them play at the very high end of the market. Their products are very expensive, so they’re really not making them affordable,” Shah said.

Shah added that he considers the model of Wayfair to be very different from Restoration Hardware and Williams-Sonoma, as they are traditional inventory players that are store based and have catalog operations. Wayfair’s model is much larger, with a mass business and selection offered for the merchandise that differentiates it.

“If you want to have the thesis that Wayfair doesn’t make sense, you could say that, but I think as you do research you would find that Wayfair is actually a very strong company,” he said.

[“source -cncb”]

Meizu Pro 5 mini photo reveals slightly different design

Meizu Pro 5 mini rumors sparked interest as compact flagships are few and far between, but we hadn’t heard much of the metal-clad champ recently.

Now a live shot of the Pro 5 mini, next to the big Meizu Pro 5, revitalizes interest in the rumored handset.

If you look below the camera, you’ll notice a dual-LED flash on the Meizu Pro 5 mini. On the big one, it’s a Laser focus element and it’s oriented the other way too (this differs from leaked renders we’ve seen so far).

The all-metal mini will allegedly bring a 4.7″ AMOLED display, a 10-core processor (Helio X20), a 20.7MP camera and a fingerprint sensor. In other words, Xperia Z5 Compact is about to get some stiff competition. The expected reveal is for April and cost will be CNY 2,000-2,500 ($315-$395), depending on storage (32GB or 64GB).
[“source -pcworld”]