The New Filler That Will Completely Change Your Skin

Photo Credits: Model Used for Illustrative Purpose Only

The extremes women will go to get better skin are endless. Some of us slather on pricey skin care products, others treat their skin to regular facials, and a large majority head straight to the doctor’s office for the latest and greatest treatments and procedures.

But all of that may be changing as a new type of filler—yes, you read that right—makes its way on to our shores.

You May Also Like: The FDA Just Approved a New Filler That’s the First of Its Kind

For years, injectables and fillers have been heralded as the remedy for adding back lost volume to the face, filling in lines and wrinkles and even augmenting some facial features. Now, a new category of fillers known as skin boosters, which includes Juvéderm Volite, is on the horizon.

Although Volite is only available in Europe, it’s totally different from what you currently know fillers as in that it improves skin texture and elasticity. The fillers on the market right now address volume and not necessarily the skin.

Used in the face, hands, décolleté and neck, and injected into the top layer of skin, skin boosters work best on areas of skin that are covered in teeny, tiny lines, like the sides of the cheeks or the chin. “Injecting skin boosters causes bioremodeling of the skin, activating elastin and collagen production and improving the look of damaged or aged skin,” says New York plastic surgeon Haideh Hirmand, MD.

Injections need to be done three times and then again every six months, but the quality of the skin can dramatically change.

Stay tuned to NewBeauty.com for updates on this exciting new innovation!

[“Source-newbeauty”]

Smoking cigarettes may change your DNA permanently

Smoking cigarettes may change your DNA permanently (Picture Courtesy-Shutterstock Images)Smoking cigarettes may change your DNA permanently (Picture Courtesy-Shutterstock Images)
Smoking is one of the biggest culprits causing fatal diseases such as cancer and heart disease. But what most of us don’t know is that smoking has the capability to change our genes. Not only that, it is said to have a lasting impact on our DNA. This also goes on to explain why it is held responsible for a host of serious health issues.

Researchers at the US National Institute of Environmental Health evaluated test results of approximately 16,000 people in 16 studies. Dr Normal Edelman, the senior scientific advisor for the American Lung Association said, “The message here is that smoking has an enormous, widespread impact on your genes. Most of it is reversible, but some is not. So if you smoke, you are going to alter your genetic makeup in a way that’s not totally reversible.” There were cases where even after five years of quitting, the genes had not recovered completely – leaving behind genetic footprints.

Talking about these genetic marks, researchers said these marks are caused by methylation, which is the process of alteration of DNA that can either deactivate a gene or alter its function, leading to diseases like cancer.

Roby Joehanes from Hebrew SeniorLife and Harvard Medical School said, “The encouraging news is that once you stop smoking, the majority of DNA methylation signals return to never-smoker levels after five years, which means your body is trying to heal itself of the harmful impacts of tobacco smoking.”

To watch the video, click here: This Is How Smoking Cigarettes Changes Your DNA Foreve

source”cnbc”

Mumbai teacher urges SSC to change exam timetable

SSC Exam

Teachers in Mumbai urged the Secondary School Certificate (SSC) Board to provide a 3-day gap between social studies and sciences in order to provide enough time for the student to revise their syllabus and retain what they had studied earlier to the fullest.

Following the timetable released by the SSC on Tuesday, Mumbai teachers expressed their concerns and complained that back-to-back papers can discredit and demoralise the students.

Teachers’ concern over SSC timetable:

  • The Mumbai Teacher’s Parishad on Tuesday in a letter also asked the Maharashtra State Board of Secondary and Higher Secondary Education to make changes in the timetable released on October 29
  • The SSC board used to keep gaps between papers to lessen students stress during the exam, said the teachers. “Usually, the board keeps a day’s gap between two papers. So, we were surprised when it didn’t do so this year,” said secretary of the teachers’ association, as reported in HT
  • “All three papers are content heavy. They should be set a day apart from each other so that students get time to refresh their minds before the next paper,” said Anil Bornare
  • The teachers’ complaint is that the SSC timetable has three papers – science, history and civics, and geography and economics – from March 20 to 22.

What does the SSC says?

Despite the concern express by the teachers, the board responded that in their attempt to wrap up the exam early, too many gaps couldn’t be provided.

“The SSC exam is already delayed by a week because of elections in the state. We have to finish them early so that results can be announced on time,” said the chairperson of the board, Gangadhar Mhamane.

The board said that there are gaps for difficult papers such as math and sciences. “Each of the social studies theory paper carries only 40 marks so it will not be a burden on students,” added Mhamane.

source”cnbc”

How The Food We Eat Makes Climate Change Worse

How The Food We Eat Makes Climate Change Worse

ROME: The way we produce and eat food must change urgently both to cut the amount of planet-warming emissions produced by agriculture, and to help farmers adapt to climate change, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said on Monday.

Without swift action, climate change will put millions of people at risk of hunger and poverty, the UN agency said in a report to mark World Food Day on October 16.

Here are some key facts:

1. Agriculture, forestry and changes in land use combined are the second largest source of greenhouse gases, producing 21 percent of global emissions. The top emitter is the energy sector at 47 percent.

2. To feed a growing global population, agricultural production must rise by about 60 percent by 2050.

3. Climate change is expected to cut harvests in developing countries in the long term – although it may also improve some crop yields in the short term.

4. If climate change continues unchecked, it will make an additional 42 million people vulnerable to hunger in 2050, according to FAO calculations. However, that figure does not include people affected by extreme weather events such as drought or floods.

5. Small farmers, cattle herders and fishermen are the most vulnerable to climate change, and will need better access to technologies, markets, information and credit to adapt to climate change.

6. Agriculture suffered some 25 percent of the total economic losses caused by climate-related disasters in developing countries between 2003 and 2013. For drought-related disasters, the share rose to 84 percent.

7. Livestock alone produces nearly two thirds of agricultural emissions – mainly from animal burping, manure and feed production. Synthetic fertilisers are the next major contributor, producing 12 percent, and rice cultivation 10 percent.
8. Carbon dioxide emissions from agriculture are mainly caused by changes in land use, such as converting forests to pasture or cropland, and land degradation from over-grazing.

9. Most direct emissions of methane and nitrous oxide are caused by livestock flatulence, rice production in flooded fields and the use of nitrogen fertilisers and manure.

10. Nearly 50 percent of world food production depends on nitrogen fertiliser. The other half depends on nitrogen found in soil, animal manure, nitrogen-fixing plants, crop residues, wastes and compost.

11. More than a third of food produced worldwide is lost or wasted. Rotting food produces methane, which is a greenhouse gas 25 times more potent than carbon dioxide.

12. Deforestation and forest degradation account for about 11 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions, more than the world’s entire transport sector.

13. Reducing agriculture emissions depends partly on cutting food waste and loss, as well as shifting people’s diets – including consuming less animal products – and changing farming practices.

source”cnbc”

Dropbox urges some users to change their passwords

dropbox logo sign

Dropbox is asking users who signed up before mid-2012 to change their passwords if they haven’t done so since then.

The cloud storage service said it was asking users to change their passwords as a preventive measure, and not because there is any indication that their accounts were improperly accessed.

Dropbox said it was taking the measure because its security teams learned about an old set of Dropbox user credentials, consisting of email addresses and hashed and salted passwords, which it believes were obtained in 2012 and could be linked to an incident the company reported around the time.

In July 2012, Dropbox said its investigation found that usernames and passwordsrecently stolen from other websites were used to sign in to a small number of of Dropbox accounts. It said it had contacted the users affected to help them protect their accounts.

The move by Dropbox comes in the wake of several breaches including that of LinkedIn in 2012, which has led to concerns that email addresses and passwords used by people across accounts could be used to compromise other services.

Starting in 2007 with a consumer focus, Dropbox, which allows users to store, access and share  files easily from a variety of devices, launched in 2013 its Dropbox Business service, its entry into the business market. The company claims over 500 million registered users, with over 200,000 businesses and organizations using Dropbox Business.

Users who signed in before 2012 and haven’t changed their password since then will be prompted by Dropbox to change it the next time they sign in. Users will have to set a stronger password with the help of a meter provided by Dropbox that measures its strength.

“If you don’t receive a prompt, you don’t need to do anything. However, for any of you who’ve used your Dropbox password on other sites, we recommend you change it on Dropbox and other services,” wrote Patrick Heim, head of trust and security at Dropbox, in a blog post Thursday.

Dropbox is also recommending that users use two-factor authentication when resetting their passwords.

On Twitter, a number of users pasted copies of emails they received from Dropbox about the password change.

source”gsmarena”

Microsoft’s giving you just 10 days now, not 31, to change your mind about Windows 10

windows 10 au start menu

Microsoft has hidden a new downgrade policy within the Windows 10 Anniversary Update: Once you’ve installed it, you’ll only have 10 days to downgrade to an earlier version or build, rather than the 31 days provided before.

Historically, Microsoft had given users a full month to roll back any updates, including upgrades to Windows 10. Supersite for Windows reported this week, however, that it was unable to downgrade to an earlier build after a 10-day limit had expired, though it wasn’t exactly clear what builds the limit applied to.

We asked Microsoft for clarification, and it boils down to this: Applying the Anniversary Update triggers the new policy. According to Microsoft, it doesn’t matter whether you’ve upgraded to Windows 10 from Windows 8 or Windows 7, or whether you simply updated your PC from an earlier version of Windows 10. Once you’ve installed the Anniversary Update, you have 10 days to back out, not 31, before the AU becomes “permanent.”

“T]his new 10-day behavior is for all upgrades and updates to the Anniversary Update,” the representative said in an email.

Why this matters: Just when you thought Microsoft’s aggressive upgrade practices were over—remember all the nastiness about deceptive upgrade tactics?—it appears Microsoft is stealthily closing the Windows 10 escape hatch. Recent Windows 10 converts need to figure out when they upgraded to Windows 10, and whether they want to keep it, pronto. And if you upgraded to Windows 10 just so you could downgrade again? You may need to act fast.

go back to windows 8

Mark Hachman

I upgraded this PC from Windows 8.1 to Windows 10 on July 28, then upgraded to the Windows 10 AU on Aug. 2. Downgrading back to version 10586 still shows that I have a month (or about Aug. 28) to roll back to Windows 8.1, which is probably still the case.

Vague Windows 10 messaging

The problem is that the new rollback period is not clearly defined by Microsoft’s own messaging within Windows 10. In fact, it’s not defined at all.

In the most recent 14393.10 version of Windows 10 (the Anniversary Update), there’s no time limit attached to the option to go back to a previous build (Settings > Update & Security > Recovery). Even after PCWorld rolled back a second PC on July 28, from the Anniversary Update to the older “vanilla” version 10586.494, the Settings menu still shows a month remaining. It’s also not clear whether rolling back from the AU to version 10586 automatically grants more time.

Microsoft’s one-year period to upgrade to Windows 10 from Windows 7 or 8.1, free of charge, ended on July 29. That gave new Windows 10 users just days before the Anniversary Updates began on Aug. 2.

Microsoft isn’t doing this to be mean, though. According to a Microsoft spokesperson, the company’s doing this to free up storage space on your PC. Downloading Windows 10, for example, requires about 3GB of space. Some amount of your drive is also used to store recovery files, whether to recover an upgrade or simply roll back to a previous build.

“Based on our user research, we noticed most users who choose to go back to a previous version of Windows do it within the first several days,” Microsoft said in a statement provided to PCWorld. “As such, we changed the setting to 10 days to free storage space used by previous copies.”

The bottom line is this: If you’re an existing Windows 10 user, and not having any issues with the Anniversary Update, you probably don’t need to do anything. We consider it to be a positive step forwardfor Windows 10.If you don’t like it and want to opt out, including going back to a previous version of Windows, it appears that your new deadline is ten days from August 2, or Friday, August 12.

Microsoft has hidden a new downgrade policy within the Windows 10 Anniversary Update: Once you’ve installed it, you’ll only have 10 days to downgrade to an earlier version or build, rather than the 31 days provided before.

Historically, Microsoft had given users a full month to roll back any updates, including upgrades to Windows 10. Supersite for Windows reported this week, however, that it was unable to downgrade to an earlier build after a 10-day limit had expired, though it wasn’t exactly clear what builds the limit applied to.

We asked Microsoft for clarification, and it boils down to this: Applying the Anniversary Update triggers the new policy. According to Microsoft, it doesn’t matter whether you’ve upgraded to Windows 10 from Windows 8 or Windows 7, or whether you simply updated your PC from an earlier version of Windows 10. Once you’ve installed the Anniversary Update, you have 10 days to back out, not 31, before the AU becomes “permanent.”

“T]his new 10-day behavior is for all upgrades and updates to the Anniversary Update,” the representative said in an email.

Why this matters: Just when you thought Microsoft’s aggressive upgrade practices were over—remember all the nastiness about deceptive upgrade tactics?—it appears Microsoft is stealthily closing the Windows 10 escape hatch. Recent Windows 10 converts need to figure out when they upgraded to Windows 10, and whether they want to keep it, pronto. And if you upgraded to Windows 10 just so you could downgrade again? You may need to act fast.

go back to windows 8

Mark Hachman

I upgraded this PC from Windows 8.1 to Windows 10 on July 28, then upgraded to the Windows 10 AU on Aug. 2. Downgrading back to version 10586 still shows that I have a month (or about Aug. 28) to roll back to Windows 8.1, which is probably still the case.

Vague Windows 10 messaging

The problem is that the new rollback period is not clearly defined by Microsoft’s own messaging within Windows 10. In fact, it’s not defined at all.

In the most recent 14393.10 version of Windows 10 (the Anniversary Update), there’s no time limit attached to the option to go back to a previous build (Settings > Update & Security > Recovery). Even after PCWorld rolled back a second PC on July 28, from the Anniversary Update to the older “vanilla” version 10586.494, the Settings menu still shows a month remaining. It’s also not clear whether rolling back from the AU to version 10586 automatically grants more time.

Microsoft’s one-year period to upgrade to Windows 10 from Windows 7 or 8.1, free of charge, ended on July 29. That gave new Windows 10 users just days before the Anniversary Updates began on Aug. 2.

Microsoft isn’t doing this to be mean, though. According to a Microsoft spokesperson, the company’s doing this to free up storage space on your PC. Downloading Windows 10, for example, requires about 3GB of space. Some amount of your drive is also used to store recovery files, whether to recover an upgrade or simply roll back to a previous build.

“Based on our user research, we noticed most users who choose to go back to a previous version of Windows do it within the first several days,” Microsoft said in a statement provided to PCWorld. “As such, we changed the setting to 10 days to free storage space used by previous copies.”

The bottom line is this: If you’re an existing Windows 10 user, and not having any issues with the Anniversary Update, you probably don’t need to do anything. We consider it to be a positive step forwardfor Windows 10.If you don’t like it and want to opt out, including going back to a previous version of Windows, it appears that your new deadline is ten days from August 2, or Friday, August 12.

Neuronal feedback could change what we ‘see’

Ever see something that isn’t really there? Could your mind be playing tricks on you? The “tricks” might be your brain reacting to feedback between neurons in different parts of the visual system, according to a study published in the Journal of Neuroscience by Carnegie Mellon University Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences Sandra J. Kuhlman and colleagues.

Understanding this feedback system could provide new insight into the visual system’s neuronal circuitry and could have further implications for understanding how the brain interprets and understands sensory stimuli.

Many optical illusions make you see something that’s not there. Take the Kanizsa triangle: when you place three Pac-Man-like wedges in the right spot, you see a triangle, even though the edges of the triangle aren’t drawn.

“We see with both our brain and our eyes. Your brain is making inferences that allow you to see the triangle. It’s connecting the dots between the corners of the wedges,” said Kuhlman, who is a member of Carnegie Mellon’s BrainHubneuroscience initiative and the joint Carnegie Mellon/University of Pittsburgh Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition (CNBC). “Optical illusions illustrate some of the amazing things our visual system can do.”

When we look at an object, information about what we see travels through circuits of neurons beginning in the retina, through the thalamus and into the brain’s visual cortex. In the visual cortex, the information gets processed in multiple stages and is ultimately sent to the prefrontal cortex — the area of the brain that makes decisions, including how to respond to a given stimulus.

However, not all information stays on this forward moving path. At the secondary stage of processing in the visual cortex some neurons reverse course and send information back to the first stage of processing. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon wondered if this feedback could change how the neurons in the visual cortex respond to a stimulus and alter the messages being sent to the prefrontal cortex.

While there has been a good deal of research studying how information moves forward through the visual system, less has been done to study the impact of the information that moves backward. To find out if the information traveling from the secondary stage of processing back to the first stage impacted how information is encoded in the visual system, the researchers needed to quantify the magnitude of information that was being sent from the second stage back to the first stage. Using a mouse model, they recorded normal neuronal firing in the first stage of the visual cortex as the mouse looked at moving patterns that represented edges. They then silenced the neurons in the second stage using modified optogenetic technology. This halted the feedback of information from the second stage back to the first stage, and allowed the researchers to determine how much of the neuronal activity in the first stage of visual processing was the result of feedback.

Twenty percent of the neuronal activity in the visual cortex was the result of feedback, a concept Kuhlman calls reciprocal connectivity. This indicates that some of the information coming from the visual cortex is not a direct response to a visual stimuli, but is a response to how the stimuli was perceived by higher cortical areas.

The feedback, she says, might be what causes our brain to complete the undrawn lines in the Kanizsa triangle. But more importantly, it signifies that studying neuronal feedback is important to our understanding of how the brain works to process stimuli.

“This represents a new way to study visual perception and neural computation. If we want to truly understand the visual pathway, and cortical function in general, we have to understand these reciprocal connection,” Kuhlman said

“source -cncb”]

Investors have a change of heart on debt

Pile of money on scale

It increasingly looks like the best of times for corporate borrowers but the worst of times for private equity firms.

A Dickensian tale is playing out in bond markets, where investment-grade corporate bond issuance took off in February but high-yield issuances remain low and are regarded as practically toxic in 2016.

“So far in 2016, global junk bond volume and activity is the lowest since 2009,” a report from finance industry data tracking firm Dealogic said.

It’s part of a creeping trend that hasn’t gone unnoticed in the private equity business. Debt financing for private equity deals slowed in the second half of last year, as credit spreads increased, a Bain & Co. report said. After four consecutive years of increasing global debt volume for leveraged buyouts, the cash available to private equity firms fell 13 percent last year, from $153 billion to $133 billion, the report shows.

At the same time, private equity firms invested more cash, in part incentivized to increased spending with the expectation of rising interest rates. The $282 billion in private equity investments were more than at any point since the financial crisis, Bain reported.

And that means private equity firms big and small have to put more cash on the table.

Consider private equity titan Apollo Global Management’s acquisition of ADT. Part of Apollo’s deal to buy out the home security company included a $750 million investment from Koch Equity Development, the investing arm of Koch Industries. The private equity firm spent $4.5 billion in equity to support the $6.93 billion deal, in part because of the challenges it might have faced had it sought to refinance more than $3.5 billion in debt the company carried.

Read MoreApollo Global to buy security services provider ADT Corp.

It’s not just bad news for private equity — which would prefer to have more cash on hand to do more deals later — it’s also bad news for big banks, which make more off high-yield issuances than they do investment-grade financing.

But corporate borrowers are encountering a much friendlier bond market. It’s just that lenders aren’t necessarily expecting investment-grade rated companies to necessarily conduct any mergers and acquisitions once they’ve raised more cash.

The $155 billion issued in investment-grade bonds issued so far in 2016 is more than any other year-to-date tally dating back to 1995, according to Dealogic data.

A Tuesday report from Bank of America Merrill Lynch suggests the positive trend for corporate borrowers will continue.

“We expect the busy supply volumes to continue into March as well, for total monthly supply between $120 [billion] and $140 [billion],” analysts wrote.

[“source -livemint”]

‘Angry Birds’ maker Rovio to change CEO

Rovio, maker of hit mobile phone game Angry Birds, said on Wednesday chief executive Pekka Rantala would step down after just a year in the role, which included deep job cuts and restructuring at the Finnish company.

Rovio, which in October cut 213 jobs after forecasting falling profits for this year, said chief legal officer Kati Levoranta would take over as new CEO from the beginning of 2016.

More independence will be given to the company’s two main units, games and media. The media unit will be led by Mikael Hed, former Rovio CEO, while Wilhelm Taht, currently head of external products, will take the helm of the games business.

“We used to have a corporate model with centralized decisions, but that resulted into too slow reacting in very competitive markets,” chairman and main owner Kaj Hed told Reuters in an interview.

“As the CEO will not be so hands-on anymore, he (Rantala) felt that it wasn’t for him anymore.”

Hed also said an initial public offer was not currently on the agenda for Rovio, but added the European gaming industry needed to consolidate and that Rovio could play a role.

Angry Birds, launched in 2009, is the most downloaded mobile app of all time, and Rovio has capitalised on the brand by licensing its use on a string of consumer products.

But that business has recently slowed down, and now the company is pinning its hopes on an Angry Birds 3D movie, due for release in May 2016 and which the company believes will yield new licensing deals.

[“source -pcworld”]

Eyes turn into skin: How inflammation can change the fate of cells

EPFL scientists have found that chronic inflammation can cause regenerating cells to grow into new, aberrant types; this is called metaplasia, and is a disorder linked to prolonged inflammation. The study highlights a new concept of chronic inflammation and could lead to better treatments.

Chronic inflammation turns the immune system on for prolonged periods of time. As a result, it underlies many disorders that are associated with chronic inflammation, including cancer and abnormal wound healing. EPFL scientists have now discovered an additional component: chronic inflammation can cause cells to actually change type – here, eye cells turned into skin. The study is published in Nature Cell Biology.

Many tissues contain a reserve of stem cells that help them heal and self-renew after injury or inflammation. Wanting to understand what happens under chronic inflammation conditions, a team of researchers led by Freddy Radtke at EPFL’s Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC) studied stem cells in the corneas of mice. To do this, they used methods that simulate chronic inflammation, and analyzed the data with techniques that light up specific cells with fluorescent stains.

The scientists found that in the cornea, the environment of stem cells changed – specifically, it became stiffer. The reason for this is both the presence of immune cells but also an increase in a substance that helps cells stick to each other and form structures and organs.

Eye cells become skin cells
The corneal stem cells, like many other cells, have sensors that measure the stiffness of surrounding tissues and allow the cells to adapt accordingly. In short, if stiffness changes, the cells react. In the cornea, the researchers found that the cell environment became so stiff that the stem cells began to turn on wrong differentiation programs: the “software” package that tells a stem cell what cell to turn into.

As a result of bad programming, the stem cells proliferated and made skin instead of cornea, causing the mice to go blind. In humans, this kind of abnormal change in the nature of a tissue is called “metaplasia”, and is associated with chronic inflammation. “Our study demonstrates an important mechanism by which chronic inflammation induces abnormal stem cell behavior,” says Freddy Radtke. “This is relevant to a variety of diseases associated with chronic inflammation, including cancer, and could yield new therapeutic targets.”

This work involved a collaboration of EPFL’s Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC) with EPFL’s Institute of Bioengineering, the University of Padua Department of Molecular Medicine, and the Cancer Cell Biology Programme of the National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO). It was funded by OptiStem, the Swiss National Science Foundation, the Swiss Cancer League, the Marie Curie Foundation, EuroSystem, and the European Research Council.

[“source-cancerquest”]