Excessive exercise may cause hair loss

Image result for Excessive exercise may cause hair lossFilled Picture: Excessive excuse may lead to hair loss

Excessive exercise places enormous energy demands on the body which may result in hair loss, says hair expert, Dr Adolf Klenk.

Klenk says hair may come under intense stress during physical exertion.

“During high-intensity exercise or sport, muscles consume a huge amount of energy, draining the rest of the body of energy, including the hair. Given that hair is a high-performance organ requiring lots of energy, this causes hair to suffer and may result in hair loss. There is also an increased release of the male hormone testosterone which impacts on hair loss,” said Klenk.

According to  Klenk, caffeine-based shampoos, can help combat hair loss.

“A shampoo that contains caffeine, taurine and special micronutrients including biotin, zinc, magnesium and calcium which stimulates the hair while supporting the metabolic processes needed for strong hair growth,” Klenk said.

Excessive exercise places enormous energy demands on the body which may result in hair loss, says  hair expert, Dr Adolf Klenk.

Klenk says  hair may come under intense stress during physical exertion.

“During high-intensity exercise or sport, muscles consume a huge amount of energy, draining the rest of the body of energy, including the hair. Given that hair is a high-performance organ requiring lots of energy, this causes hair to suffer and may result in hair loss. There is also an increased release of the male hormone testosterone which impacts on hair loss,” said Klenk.

According to  Klenk, caffeine-based shampoos can help combat hair loss.

“Such shampoos contains caffeine, taurine and special micronutrients including biotin, zinc, magnesium and calcium which stimulates the hair while supporting the metabolic processes needed for strong hair growth,” Klenk said.

The caffeine shampoos have been specially developed for active men who have an increased energy demand, he added., he added.

[“Source-iol”]

Yoga can cause musculoskeletal pain

woman doing the downward dog pose

While yoga can help to alleviate pain, research shows that it can also cause it.
Yoga is often hailed as an effective practice for pain relief. A new study, however, notes that yoga can also cause pain, and yoga-related injuries are much more common than one may think.

The research suggests that every year, more than 10 percent of people who practice yogain a recreational capacity experience musculoskeletal pain, particularly in the upper limbs, as a result.

What is more, the study found that yoga actually worsens more than a fifth of existing injuries.

Lead study author Prof. Evangelos Pappas, of the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Sydney in Australia, and colleagues recently reported their findings in the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies.

Yoga is one of the most common mind and body practices in the United States, and its popularity is increasing. According to a survey conducted by Yoga Alliance last year, around 37 million U.S. adults practice yoga, a significant rise from 20 million in 2012.

But why is yoga so appealing? Aside from its stress-relieving effects, one reason why people are attracted to yoga is its ability to ease pain. A recent study reported by Medical News Today found that for low back pain, yoga is just as beneficial as physical therapy.

However, the new study from Prof. Pappas and team suggests that caution should be applied when practicing yoga, as it could do more harm than good.

Upper limb pain most common

For their study, the researchers analyzed the data of 354 adults who engaged in recreational yoga.

Participants completed two electronic questionnaires 1 year apart, which gathered information on any musculoskeletal pain they might have, where in the body this pain occurred, and pain severity.

The data revealed that 10.7 percent of participants experienced musculoskeletal pain as a result of yoga.

“In terms of severity, more than one third of cases of pain caused by yoga were serious enough to prevent yoga participation and lasted more than 3 months,” notes Prof. Pappas.

Pain in the upper extremities – including the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand – was the most common type of pain caused by yoga, which Prof. Pappas speculates may be down to “postures that put weight on the upper limbs,” such as the downward dog.

For subjects with pre-existing musculoskeletal injuries, around 21 percent of these injuries were exacerbated by yoga participation, the team reports. Pre-existing upper limb pain was most affected by yoga.

Injury rate higher than previous reports

However, the study also brought some positive news; around 74 percent of participants reported that their pre-existing musculoskeletal pain had improved as a result of yoga.

Still, the researchers believe that their findings highlight the need for caution when it comes to practicing yoga, especially for people who already have musculoskeletal pain.

“Our study found that the incidence of pain caused by yoga is more than 10 percent per year,” says Prof. Pappas, “which is comparable to the injury rate of all sports injuries combined among the physically active population.”

However people consider it to be a very safe activity. This injury rate is up to 10 times higher than has previously been reported.”

Prof. Evangelos Pappas

The researchers say that their findings may help both healthcare professionals and patients to compare the risks of yoga with other types of physical activity, allowing them to make informed decisions about which form of exercise is best.

“We recommend that yoga teachers also discuss with their students the risks for injury if not practiced conscientiously, and the potential for yoga to exacerbate some injuries,” adds Prof. Pappas.

“Yoga participants are encouraged to discuss the risks of injury and any pre-existing pain, especially in the upper limbs, with yoga teachers and physiotherapists to explore posture modifications that may result in safer practice.”

[“Source-medicalnewstoday”]

Dear men, work-related stress may cause cancer

ANI | Jan 18, 2017, 04.00 PM IST

Dear men, work-related stress may cause cancerDear men, work-related stress may cause cancer
The findings indicate that the link was observed in men, who had been exposed to 15 to 30 years of work-related stressand in some cases, more than 30 years.

According to the study published in journal of Preventive Medicine, prolonged exposure of men to work-related stress has been linked to an increased likelihood of lung, colon, rectal and stomach cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Researchers at INRS and Universite de Montreal in Canada conducted the study to assess the link between cancer and work-related stress perceived by men throughout their working life.

On average, the study participants had held four jobs, with some holding up to a dozen or more during their working lifetime.

A link between work-related stress and cancer was not found in participants who had held stressful jobs for less than 15 years.

Significant links to five of the eleven cancers considered in the study were revealed.

The most stressful jobs included firefighter, industrial engineer, aerospace engineer, mechanic foreman, and vehicle and railway-equipment repair worker and for the same individual, stress varied depending on the job held.

The study also shows that perceived stress is not limited to high work load and time constraints.

“One of the biggest flaws in previous cancer studies is that none of them assessed work-related stress over a full working lifetime, making it impossible to determine how the duration of exposure to work-related stress affects cancer development,” the authors explained.

“Our study shows the importance of measuring stress at different points in an individual’s working life,” the authors noted.

Customer service, sales commissions, responsibilities, the participant’s anxious temperament, job insecurity, financial problems, challenging or dangerous work conditions, employee supervision, interpersonal conflict and a difficult commute were all sources of stress listed by the participants.

source”cnbc”

US study reveals possible cause of premature births

US study reveals possible cause of premature birthsUS study reveals possible cause of premature births
A new US study, involving more than 100 pregnant women may have solved the mystery of why many babies are born prematurely.

The study published Wednesday in the US journal Science Translational Medicine pinpointed abnormal calcium deposits in the membranes surrounding the developing foetus as a potential culprit in premature birth, Xinhua news agency reported.

The deposits are early markers of bone formation, making the membranes less elastic and more prone to breaking significantly early, according to the study conducted by Ohio-based Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

“We do see calcium deposits in full term births as well, which is probably part of the normal breakdown of the membranes at the appropriate time,” Irina Buhimschi, Director of the Center for Perinatal Research at the hospital’s Research Institute, said in a statement.

“The membranes are supposed to rupture when labour is underway. However, these calcium deposits are too many and too early,” Buhimschi said. Abnormal calcium deposits have been previously linked to kidney stones, atherosclerosis, and aneurism rupture.

The findings suggested that it may be possible to identify pregnancies at greater risk for premature rupture of membranes, said Buhimschi. They also suggested possible interventions to prevent these kinds of pre-term births. “I believe strongly that there are dietary measures that would improve the intra-amniotic environment for these women,” she said.

“We know that dietary interventions are critical in atherosclerosis and other disease processes that involve calciprotein particles. We just have never considered it in pre-term premature rupture of membranes before,” she added.

source”gsmarena”

Your love for sugary beverages may cause prediabetes

Individuals who regularly consume sugar-sweetened beverages such as soda, colas and other carbonated beverages, and non-carbonated fruit drinks such as lemonade and fruit punch, may be at an higher risk of developing prediabetes, new research has revealed.

Prediabetes is a condition in which blood sugar is high, but not high enough to be Type 2 diabetes. If diagnosed early, it is reversible through lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise.

“Our results suggest that high sugar-sweetened beverage intake increases the chances of developing early warning signs for Type 2 diabetes,” said Nicola McKeown, Associate Professor at the Tufts University, Massachusetts in the US.

“If lifestyle changes are not made, individuals with prediabetes are on the trajectory to developing diabetes,” McKeown added.

The findings showed that adults who drink a can of soda per day or a median of six 12 fluid ounce servings a week are at 46 per cent higher risk of developing prediabetes.

Further, the highest consumers of sugar-sweetened beverages had nearly eight per cent higher insulin resistance scores, compared to low- or non-consumers.

On the other hand, diet soda — defined as low-calorie cola or other carbonated low-calorie beverages — intake was found with no associations with risk for either prediabetes or insulin resistance, the study said.

However, and further studies are needed to reveal the long-term health impact of artificially sweetened drinks, the researchers noted.

source”cnbc”

Longer working hours, work related stress is the major cause of cardiac stroke: Study

Longer working hours, work related stress is the major cause of cardiac stroke: Study (Thinkstock photos/Getty Images)
Longer working hours, work related stress is the major cause of cardiac stroke: Study (Thinkstock photos/Getty Images)

The case of young people fainting due to exhaustion is not an unknown factor in the current times in young people.

When Prateek fainted in his office, his colleagues assumed that he was exhausted with the long hours he had been putting in at office. Little did they know or were prepared for when the doctor at the hospital they had rushed Prateek to informed them that their colleague had had a stroke!

Prateek Gogia was a young corporate executive who had worked his way up the ladder with sheer hard work. He had put in hours every day, much beyond what was expected of him and put his personal life on the back burner. He was at an enviable position in his organization and many did not even like it that he had climbed the corporate ladder so quickly!

For millions of working people, the dream of having a career and a personal life balance seems like a faraway possibility. This is especially true in developing nations, where professionals frequently work overtime, neglect to take paid time off, and are locked into cycles of workaholism. It’s even more prevalent with entrepreneurs. It’s really not surprising that stress from working too much causes so many illnesses, diseases and disorders along with family problems with strokes topping the list.

If you happen to meet an executive, you will find that during the interaction the following points is being highlighted on what he/she is going through anxiety/worry/job insecurity, getting upset over trivial issues, psychosomatic pains, depression, substance abuse, insomnia.

According to Dr Bhawna Barmi, the senior clinical psychologist at Fortis Escorts Heart Institute, they did a research to find out “the sources of stress and responses to stress in executives”.

The hospital took a sample size of 2000 patients of age group of 30-45 years. We included both males and females as they are equal part of growing India. We took 1400 males and 600 females in our study.

The most widely accepted explanation of job satisfaction is given by Locke (1976), who defined job satisfaction as “a pleasurable or positive emotional state resulting from the appraisal of one’s job or job experiences”.

Job has emotional, cognitive and behavioral components. During the analysis with sample size it was found that generally, if you go and tell anyone that he or she is suffering from stress and need counseling the first reaction is that – I don’t need a counsel to listen me.

They will agree that they are satisfied with their personal and professional life balance. But when you make them understand that there is need and they should listen to their mind calling, there are chances of improvement.

We have known for several years that diet and exercise can help people maintain their physical health and live longer, but maintaining mental health is just as important. Lifestyle changes are a process that take time and require support. Once you’re ready to make a change, the difficult part is committing and following through. Careful planning means setting small goals and taking things one step at a time.

Here are some ways to restore work life balance, harmony to your lifestyle and that will help you make lasting positive lifestyles and behavior changes.

Make a plan that will stick. Your plan is a map that will guide you on this journey of change. You can even think of it as an adventure. When making your plan, be specific. Want to exercise more? Detail the time of day when you can take walks and how long you’ll walk. Write everything down, and ask yourself if you’re confident that these activities and goals are realistic for you. If not, start with smaller steps. Post your plan where you’ll most often see it as a reminder.

Change one behavior at a time. Unhealthy behaviors develop over the course of time, so replacing unhealthy behaviors with healthy ones requires time. Many people run into problems when they try to change too much too fast. To improve your success, focus on one goal or change at a time. As new healthy behaviors become a habit, try to add another goal that works toward the overall change you’re striving for.

Put your personal health first. A large part of having work life balance is taking good care of your physical and mental well-being. Eating a healthy diet, getting adequate exercise, and taking breaks can help you to remain healthy. This health translates to better performance when engaged in work or family activity.

Learn to manage time well. A poorly managed schedule can lead to work life overload fast. If you find yourself spending hours doing meaningless tasks, or repeating the same tedious activities over and over again, perhaps it’s time to take a look at what you can do to stop wasting time. Remember, we all get the same amount of time each day, so make the most of this to recapture work life balance. We work with a number of clients to streamline and automate their business to save time.

Prioritize your family, then work. Create your own personal time boundaries and stick to them. Ensure you build family time into your schedule and ‘me’ time and do not compromise that time. Don’t answer your phone or check emails. Keep the time devoted to your family to connect and focus. Do not be distracted by work obligations.

Ask for support. Accepting help from those who care about you and will listen strengthens your resilience and commitment. If you feel overwhelmed or unable to meet your goals on your own, consider seeking help from a psychologist. Psychologists are uniquely trained to understand the connection between the mind and body, as well as the factors that promote behaviour change. Asking for help doesn’t mean a lifetime of therapy; even just a few sessions can help you examine and set attainable goals or address the emotional issues that may be getting in your way. (ANI)

source”cnbc”

Air Pollution May Cause Blood Vessel Damage, Says Study

Air Pollution May Cause Blood Vessel Damage, Says Study

.Air Pollution May Cause Blood Vessel Damage, Says Study
blood vessels may cause blood vessel damage, inflammation among young, healthy adults, say scintists
WASHINGTON: Exposure to fine particulate matter may cause blood vessel damage and inflammation among young, healthy adults, according to scientists including one of Indian origin, who have found how air pollution contributes to cardiovascular disease and related deaths.

For the study, researchers studied the component of air pollution known as fine particulate matter (PM2.5) – the tiny pieces of solid or liquid pollution emitted from motor vehicles, factories, power plants, fires and smoking.

They found that periodic exposure to fine particulate matter was associated with several abnormal changes in the blood that are markers for cardiovascular disease.

As air pollution rose, they found small, micro-particles indicating cell injury and death significantly increased in number; levels of proteins that inhibit blood vessel growth increased; and proteins that signify blood-vessel inflammation also showed significant increased.

“These results substantially expand our understanding about how air pollution contributes to cardiovascular disease by showing that exposure is associated with a cascade of adverse effects,” said study lead author C Arden Pope professor at Brigham Young University in the US.

“These findings suggest that living in a polluted environment could promote the development of high blood pressure, heart disease, and stroke more pervasively and at an earlier stage than previously thought,” said Aruni Bhatnagar, professor at the University of Louisville in the US.
“Although we have known for some time that air pollution can trigger heart attacks or strokes in susceptible, high-risk individuals, the finding that it could also affect even seemingly healthy individuals suggests that increased levels of air pollution are of concern to all of us, not just the sick or the elderly,” Bhatnagar said.

Study participants included 72 healthy, non-smoking, adults. Their average age was 23, most were white, and more than half were male.

During the winters of 2013, 2014, and 2015, participants provided blood samples, which researchers then tested for markers of cardiovascular disease.

Researchers were able to evaluate these informative blood markers with various levels of air pollution.

However, they noted that the third study year, 2015, was relatively unpolluted, which could have affected the results.

source”cnbc”

Your Increasing Waist Size May Cause Liver Cancer

Your Increasing Waist Size May Cause Liver Cancer

NEW YORK: Individuals with high body mass index (BMI), increased waist circumference, and Type 2 diabetes may be at an increased risk of developing liver cancer, a study has found.

The findings showed that for every 5 kg/m2 increase in BMI, there was a 38 and 25 per cent increase in the risk for liver cancer in men and women, respectively.

For every 5 cm increase in waist circumference, the increase in risk for liver cancer was was 8 per cent.

Participants with Type 2 diabetes mellitus were 2.61 times more likely to be diagnosed with liver cancer, and the risk increases with increase in BMI, the researchers said.

“Liver cancer isn’t simply related to excess alcohol intake and viral hepatitis infection. We found that each of these three factors was associated, robustly, with liver cancer risk. All three relate to metabolic dysfunction,” said Peter Campbell, researcher at the American Cancer Society.

The study adds substantial support to liver cancer being on the list of obesity-associated cancers.
Thus, “this is yet another reason to maintain a body weight in the ‘normal’ range for your height”, Campbell said.

The results are also consistent with other data indicating that obesity and diabetes might be playing a role in the rapid increase in liver cancer in recent decades, he added.

For the study, the team pooled data from 1.57 million adults enrolled in 14 different US-based prospective studies.

At enrolment, participants completed questionnaires related to their height, weight, alcohol intake, tobacco use, and other factors potentially related to cancer risk. None of them had cancer at enrolment.

source”gsmarena”

Fears Of Ageing May Cause Earlier Death: UN

Fears Of Ageing May Cause Earlier Death: UN

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Fears Of Ageing May Cause Earlier Death: UN
Photo for representational purpose only.
GENEVA: Being afraid of growing old may shorten your life, the UN health agency said Thursday, as new data highlighted the widespread prevalence of ageist attitudes worldwide.

In a first-of-its-kind survey released by the World Health Organization, 60 percent of respondents said they believed older people “were not respected.”

Attitudes towards older people were more negative in richer countries, according to the data from more than 83,000 respondents, who were 18 years of age and older in 57 countries.

The data confirms “that ageism is extremely common,” said John Beard, WHO’s head of Ageing and Life Course.

He warned that discriminatory and negative views about older people can have sweeping consequences, including for younger people.

“There is very good evidence that people who have negative views of themselves as they grow older… it shortens their lives,” Beard told reporters.

WHO cited recently published research indicating that “people who hold negative views about their own ageing, do not recover as well from disability and live on average 7.5 years less than people with positive attitudes.”

Attitudes about ageing are “on the level that racism and sexism were maybe 20, 30 or 40 years ago,” Beard said.
“Things which are no longer accepted if you were talking about someone on the basis of their race or sex are still tolerated when it comes down to their age.”

WHO does not define the group of people victimised by ageism.

Such discrimination could be directed at a 50-year-old seeking a new job, or a 65-year-old facing mandatory retirement but who remains a productive employee.

The WHO official also came out against compulsory, age-defined policies like mandatory retirement, describing them as “problematic”.

In seeking a more just definition of what it means to be old, Beard said WHO had begun using the mid-point of life expectancy in each country.

That means, for example, in Britain, where life expectancy is 81, anyone over 41 would be defined as “older”, Beard said, voicing hope that this new definition would be “liberating” for those who viewed the onset of their 60s as an ominous benchmark.

There are currently an estimated 600 million people worldwide over the age of 60, a figure set to double by 2025 and hit two billion by 2050, according to WHO.

Because the survey released Thursday was the first set of global data on ageism, WHO officials said it was difficult to track how attitudes had shifted over time, but added there was some evidence that ageism was on the rise.

source”cnbc”

Poverty May Cause Premature Ageing: Study

Poverty May Cause Premature Ageing: Study

Poverty and perceived hardship among young people may put them at the risk of worse cognitive function and premature ageing, a new study has warned.

Previous research has shown that exposure to poor socioeconomic conditions during childhood, adulthood, or cumulatively, is associated with cognitive deficits.

“Income is dynamic and individuals are likely to experience income changes and mobility especially between young adulthood and midlife,” said lead investigator Adina Zeki Al Hazzouri from the University of Miami in the US.

“Monitoring changes in income and financial difficulty over an extended period of time and how these influence cognitive health is of great public health interest,” she said.

Zeki Al Hazzouri and her colleagues examined the effects of sustained poverty and perceived financial difficulty on cognitive function in midlife using income data for about 3,400 adults who took part in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) prospective cohort study.

The CARDIA study included black and white males and females 18 to 30 years of age at the start of the study in 1985-86.

Income data were collected from study participants six times between 1985 and 2010. Sustained poverty was defined as the percentage of time the participants’ household income was less than 200 per cent of the US federal poverty level.

Participants were divided into four groups: never in poverty; less than 1/3 of the time; from 1/3 to nearly 100 per cent of the time; or always in poverty.
In 2010, at a mean age of 50 years, participants underwent three tests that are widely used and considered reliable to detect cognitive ageing.

The study found strong and graded associations between greater exposure to economic hardship and worse cognitive function, processing speed in particular, leading investigators to conclude that poverty and perceived hardship may be important contributors to cognitive ageing.

Individuals with all-time poverty performed significantly worse than those never in poverty.

Similar results were observed in persons with perceived financial difficulty.

“Maintaining cognitive abilities is a key component of health,” said Zeki Al Hazzouri.

“Findings among this relatively young cohort place economic hardship as being on the pathway to cognitive ageing and as an important contributor to premature ageing among economically disadvantaged populations,” she said.

The research was published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

source”cnbc”