Cancer cases may rise 6 times among women in 20 years

Sushmi Dey| TNN | Feb 4, 2017, 03.37 PM IST

Cancer cases may rise 6 times among women in 20 years (Getty Images)Cancer cases may rise 6 times among women in 20 years (Getty Images)
Incidence of cancer is projected to be six times more among women over the next two decades, mainly because of obesity , according to an assessment by Cancer Research, UK.Several of the obesity related cancers only affect women leading to a greater possibility of the disease among them. Besides obesity, smoking is also considered a significant reason for faster rate of cancer among women.

Cases of ovarian, cervical and oral cancers are predicted to rise the most, the analysis said. According to World Health Organisation (WHO), around one third of deaths from cancer are due to the five leading behavioural and dietary risks: high body mass index, low fruit and vegetable intake, lack of physical activity and to bacco and alcohol use.

The new data released by WHO, ahead of World Cancer Day on February 4, shows that the disease is now responsible for almost one in six deaths globally with around 8.8 million deaths from cancer reported every year. According to the UN agency , lowand middle-income countries account for two-thirds of cancer deaths as many of them lack early screening and basic treatment facilities for all.

Over 10 lakh new cases of cancer are diagnosed every year in India. However, due to late diagnosis over 7 lakh people die from the disease every year. Projections by Indian Council of Medical Research show India is likely to have over 17.3 lakh new cases of cancer and over 8.8 lakh deaths due to the disease by 2020.

source”cnbc”

New Breast Cancer Cases To Rise To 3.2 Million A Year By 2030

New Breast Cancer Cases To Rise To 3.2 Million A Year By 2030

New Breast Cancer Cases To Rise To 3.2 Million A Year By 2030
India, China have the largest number of women with breast and cervical cancer.
TORONTO: By 2030, the number of women diagnosed every year with breast cancer could almost double to 3.2 million and cervical cancer cases can rise at least 25 per cent to over 700,000 globally unless urgent action is taken, a study has cautioned.

The findings of the study, published in the Lancet, have showed that India and China are two countries with the largest number of women with breast and cervical cancer.

Globally, cervical and breast cancer take the lives of 800,000 women every year — with two-thirds of breast cancer deaths and nine out of 10 cervical cancer deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries.

Five-year survival after diagnosis for breast cancer ranges from around 50 per cent in South Africa, Mongolia and India, to over 80 per cent in 34 countries, including Australia, the UK, Ireland, France, Germany and the US, highlighting huge inequalities in access to prevention, early detection, and treatment.

Persistent underinvestment in low- and middle-income countries, which receive just 5 per cent of global funding for cancer, has exacerbated the issue.

Further, with many competing health priorities in low- and middle-income countries, services for women’s cancers are given low priority and allocated few resources.
In addition, “there is a widespread misconception that breast and cervical cancers are too difficult and expensive to prevent and treat, particularly in resource-poor countries where the burden of these diseases is highest,” said lead author Ophira Ginsburg, professor at the University of Toronto, Canada.

Yet, breast and cervical cancer are not inevitably fatal and can be prevented and treated, say the authors, particularly if they are detected and treated at an early stage, the researchers observed.

“There are several low-cost, feasible interventions that do not require specialised care in hospital or massive capital investment, and which could be integrated into existing health-care programmes,” explains Lynette Denny, professor at University of Cape Town, South Africa.

Cervical cancer, for example, is almost entirely preventable thanks to cost-effective routine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of girls and cervical screening with treatment of pre-cancers, neither of which require oncologists, or specialist cancer centres, and can prevent 600,000 future cervical cancer deaths in the world’s poorest countries over the next four years.

While mammography and late treatment of breast cancer are likely unaffordable, clinical breast examination screening and breast awareness campaigns are likely to be cost-effective in diagnosing early stage breast cancer in LMICs, and could in turn help promote early treatment.

The response to women’s cancers needs to be seen as a vital part of international commitments to achieve universal health coverage and the new sustainable development goals, the authors said

source”cnbc”

Not,robocop,,but,robojudge?,AI,learns,to,rule,in,human,rights,cases

ECHR European Court of Human Rights

An artificial intelligence system designed to predict the outcomes of cases at the European Court of Human Rights would side with the human judges 79 percent of the time.

Researchers at University College London and the University of Sheffield in the U.K., and the University of Pennsylvania in the U.S., described the system in a paper published Monday by the Peer Journal of Computer Science.

“We formulated a binary classification task where the input of our classifiers is the textual content extracted from a case and the target output is the actual judgment as to whether there has been a violation of an article of the convention of human rights,” wrote the paper’s authors, Nikolaos Aletras, Dimitrios Tsarapatsanis, Daniel Preoţiuc-Pietro and Vasileios Lampos.

The system examined public court documents relating to 584 cases of violations of articles 3 (prohibiting torture), 6 (right to a fair trial) and 8 (respect for private life) of the European Convention on Human Rights, which has been ratified by 47 European countries.

The court documents have a distinctive structure, discussing first the procedure by which the case reached the court, the facts and circumstances of the case, relevant law, and the legal arguments applied. Then, for each alleged violation of an article of the convention, they examine the parties’ submissions and the judges’ evaluation of their merits, before concluding with the verdict or, in the court’s terminology, the operative provisions.

The researchers extracted clusters of words (N-grams) from the procedure, circumstances, relevant law, facts and legal argument sections of the case documents, and to generate lists of topics, or semantically related groups of word clusters, for each case.

Then they applied machine learning algorithms called support vector machine (SVM) classifiers to determine which of those data inputs most accurately predicted the outcome of the cases. They set aside 10 percent of the cases to test the accuracy of their system.

Of all the data, they found that it was the topic list and the circumstances of the case that provided the best predictors of case outcome, allowing them to predict 79 percent of verdicts in their sample of article 3, 6 and 8 cases correctly.

The researchers don’t see AI replacing judges or lawyers, but say it could help them rapidly identify patterns in cases that lead to certain outcomes.

“It could also be a valuable tool for highlighting which cases are most likely to be violations of the European Convention on Human Rights,” said Aletras.

That could well be of interest to the court in managing its workload: In 2015 it delivered 823 judgments — but struck out or dismissed 43,100 as inadmissible. The previous year, almost twice as many were ruled inadmissible, for 891 judgments delivered.

This suggests that judges at the court are realists, not formalists, and choose to take into the importance of non-legal facts, such as the life circumstances of a plaintiff. Studies of other high-level courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court, have uncovered similar patterns, the researchers said.

source”cnbc”

IIT Madras double suicide cases: Professor’s wife and female scholar found hanging

In quite a shocking incident, two women including a professor’s wife and a research scholar at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Madras had committed suicide.

The former Vijayalakshmi was a 47-year-old woman and wife of physics assistant professor Ganeshan. She was found hanging inside her quarters around 3 pm. On the other hand, just after an hour or so, the 34-year-old post-doctoral research scholar in chemistry P Maheshwari was found hanging in her hostel room. IIT-M announced full cooperation to officials in this case, condoling the scholar’s death.

In a statement issued, it said, “IIT-Madras, reports with deep sadness the death of a post-doctoral research scholar in the campus. The scholar’s family has been informed. The institute is taking necessary action and extending full cooperation to civil authorities.The institute extends its deep felt condolences to the family and the near and dear ones of the scholar for the unfortunate, untimely and devastating loss.”

(Read:Janitor’s eight-year-old daughter to get admitted in best English medium school)

Reason behind the suicides:

Police officials said that investigation is still on and they are trying to dig out the reason behind Maheshwari’s decision to take such an extreme step. Married for 12 years, she was a resident of Puducherry and was staying at the Sabarmati hostel on the campus. According to some sources in the police, she was reported to be depressed and had attempted suicide earlier also.

Although the investigation is still on, a senior police official said that the reason behind them taking their own lives could be “family issues.” IIT Madras had witnessed similar suicide cases of two students last year in the month of October, as well.

About IIT Madras

The Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Madras is one among the foremost institutes of national importance in higher technological education, basic and applied research. It has established itself as a premier centre for teaching, research and industrial consultancy in the country.

[“source -cncb”]

Facebook clarifies live video policy, will allow graphic video streams in some cases

151027 facebook headquarters 3

Facebook will allow its users to livestream violent or graphic video under certain circumstances, the company announced in a statement released Friday.

In the statement, the social media giant stated that, “if a person witnessed a shooting, and used Facebook Live to raise awareness or find the shooter, we would allow it.” On the other hand, the company will not allow such videos to be used “to mock the victim or celebrate the shooting.”

“Live video on Facebook is a new and growing format,” the statement continues. “We’ve learned a lot over the past few months, and will continue to make improvements to this experience wherever we can.”

The story behind the story: Facebook’s statement comes in the wake of a series of high-profile incidents this past week in which police officers shot and killed two African American men and a gunman shot 11 police officers, killing five, in Dallas Thursday night. Social media has played a large role in documenting each of these recent events. In the case of of Philando Castile, who a police officer shot during a traffic stop, his girlfriend, Diamond Reynolds, used Facebook Live to document the shooting’s immediate aftermath.
[“source -cncb”]