Why Donald Trump’s diet is bad for America’s health

President Trump can eat what he wants, but his attitudes toward wellness have major consequences for the nation at large. (Stephen Lovekin/Hill & Knowlton)

It was the fat joke heard ‘round the world. Pope Francis, speaking with Donald and Melania Trump during their recent visit, asked the first lady whether she’d been feeding her husband potica, a rich Slovenian dessert.

His Holiness wasn’t the only one eyeballing the president’s diet. Recently, the public learned that the White House kitchen staff knows to deliver their boss extra Thousand Island dressing and a double serving of ice cream while his guests get vinaigrette and a single scoop of vanilla, triggering sniggers about presidential gluttony.

And since Trump so shamelessly slings stingingly personal insults tied to fitness and body type — from “Miss Piggy” to “fat pig” to “Little Marco” – why resist the urge to poke his proverbial soft underbelly?

We should resist, because Trump’s attitudes toward healthy eating and exercise aren’t a joke — they have serious consequences for the nation’s health. First, they mark a dramatic pivot from his presidential predecessors on both sides of the aisle. Previous presidents saw projecting a personal embrace of healthy living as politically attractive, while Trump perceives just the opposite.

And second, in a nation already defined by highly unequal access to healthy food and exercise, Trump’s own inclinations threaten to make wellness an even lower public and private priority. Today, if your work schedule, child care and next meal are unpredictable, wellness is at best aspirational and at worst a cruel reminder of yet another dividing line between haves and have-nots. Trump’s attitudes and actions will only exacerbate this inequality — even as they thrill his fans.

American presidents have celebrated wellness as a personal and political virtue for so long it verges on cliché. Teddy Roosevelt famously advocated an outdoorsy “strenuous life,” which showcased his own swagger and resonated in a moment when urbanization and the expansion of white-collar work provoked anxiety that white men were becoming sedentary sissies.

Sixty years later, President-elect John F. Kennedy decried in Sports Illustrated that affluence had created a physically and morally “Soft American” unfit for Cold War citizenship. This essay painted JFK as a champion of “vigor” (even as he privately suffered from serious ailments) and boosted support for federally funded physical education and recreation programs.

Democrats Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton were often photographed jogging, while a 1983 Parade spread featured Republican Ronald Reagan exercising on Nautilus machines and chopping wood. Fellow Republican George W. Bush installed a treadmill on Air Force One, required staffers to exercise and told Runner’s World in 2002 that at long last, “statistic after statistic is beginning to sink into the consciousness of the American people that exercise is one of the keys to a healthy lifestyle.”

President Trump, however, missed that memo. The president’s conspicuous contempt for self-care — unlike Obama’s occasional furtive cigarette — benefits him politically in part because it taps into the anti-Obama hatred that propelled him to power. The Obamas took the presidential embrace of healthy living as a vehicle to improve society and self to new levels.

Men’s Health dubbed Obama the “fittest president ever” and stealth video of his workout in a Warsaw hotel gym went viral. If Michelle Obama first drew notice for her sculpted biceps, her legacy became Let’s Move and lunchroom reform. So powerful is this association that a Tennessee school cafeteria worker recently told me that a Trump supporter crowed that serving her child chocolate milk and tater tots at school was a “personal F-U to Michelle Obama.”

Not only does Trump benefit from being the anti-Obama, but he also gives voice to a sense among his supporters that healthy eating and exercise have become increasingly elitist. Back in 2007, Obama caught blowback at an Iowa campaign stop for making casual reference to buying arugula at Whole Foods. Soon after, white working class reality TV star Mama June proudly told In Touch that despite her wealth, she served her family “sketti” — enriched spaghetti doused in butter and ketchup — rather than snobbishly preparing quinoa.

Trump’s self-fashioning as champion of the common man capitalizes on the contemporary association between wellness and unsavory cosmopolitan pretension. Yet his love of rich foods and leisure paradoxically trades on century-old tropes that also cast him as a kind of Everyman’s Billionaire. Until about 1920, the wealthy conspicuously consumed caloric foods and avoided exertion because few felt they could afford to do so.

Dominant scientific theory at the time argued that humans were born with a finite energy supply and that the better classes should conserve theirs for loftier ends than physical labor. When industrialization and the white-collar sector made food abundant and sedentary work more accessible however, resisting these temptations through diet and exercise became a display of upper-class restraint — as it remains today.

Trump, whose appeal to many stems from nostalgia, conjures an outdated but aspirational ideal of what wealth might feel, or taste, like. It’s why dropping $36 on an “haute burger” just after overwhelmingly capturing the working class white vote didn’t tarnish Trump’s legitimacy. It’s why the “cheap version of rich” marketed in every truffle-oil-soaked steak slung at his eponymous “Grille” still sells. Same goes for his peculiar but precedented explanation that he prefers relaxing at his various luxury properties to exercise that would deplete his “non-rechargeable battery.” In the throwback image of American abundance that Trump hawks, his supporters envision themselves as deserving fat cats consuming cake rather than kale.

And yet. While expending energy on exercise and dietary restraint may be undesirable for Trump’s everyman, it’s a requirement for the women in his orbit. Of the little we know about Melania Trump, her penchant for Pilates is widely reported and a former roommate remembered her consuming only vegetables and diligently wearing ankle weights around the house. First daughter Ivanka Trump’s diet and exercise routines have long been the stuff of lifestyle pubs, and she recently craved a sweat badly enough to cause controversy by enrolling at a D.C. studio under an alias.

In 1996, Trump himself set up a media scrum in a gym to film a tearful Alicia Machado exercising after she gained what he determined was an unacceptable amount of weight for Miss Universe. A viral meme in the wake of the January Women’s March announced, “In one day, Trump got more fat women out walking than Michelle Obama did in 8 years.”

Clearly, Trump’s world is a sexist one in which wellness is a women’s issue. Weight control is appropriately top priority for the half of the population whose worth corresponds to their waistlines.

Unlike exercise and diet, sports — especially football — have long earned the approval of conservatives, including Trump, for building masculinity and competitiveness. The president’s apparently contradictory celebration of sport and scorn for healthy living actually corresponds to a longstanding cultural divide between the two. In the 1950s and 60s, straight American males were assumed to be so uninterested in diet and exercise that women’s magazines counseled wives to trim the fat from their husband’s roasts out of eyesight in order to safeguard the health of their hearts and egos.

By 1979, historian Christopher Lasch bemoaned the “degradation of sport” due to the “new sports for the noncompetitive” taking place in gyms and studios, which promoted bland “amateurism” in the name of inclusiveness and health promotion. (Some might consider this a forerunner to conservative complaints about participation trophies.) Thus, in the Trump playbook, sports are commendable for building manly character, while expanding opportunities to exercise and eat mindfully for health or beauty is feminine and inferior.

Making America Great Again will affect our collective wellbeing in subtle ways beyond the AHCA, cuts to Planned Parenthood and the deregulation of school nutrition that Trump embraces. Contemporary wellness culture is flawed, but has dramatically improved Americans’ lives and saved taxpayers millions. Diverse policies and programs ranging from Title IX, to yoga for the incarcerated, to corporate wellness initiatives, to body-positive activism have helped make the connection between healthy living and human flourishing widely accepted. Trump threatens to destroy those gains.

We owe our president the privacy to eat and exercise as he wishes, free from the fat-shaming cruelty for which his critics rightly fault him. But when he brandishes his unhealthy lifestyle to romanticize an era in which junk science upheld twisted ideas about gender, class and health, we owe it to each other to resist the deepening wellness divide, body, heart and mind.

[“Source-washingtonpost”]

Bad Posture For Long Hours Contributing To Osteoarthritis Among Youth

Bad Posture For Long Hours Contributing To Osteoarthritis Among Youth

NEW DELHI: As the number of youth suffering from osteorthritis continues to surge globally, health experts today said that wrong postures for long durations was the biggest contributor to the disease.

According to them, the issue was important because scientifically no amount of exercise or therapy can undo the problems caused by hours of bad posture a day.

“Maintaining a right posture is a serious health business; so much so that a bad posture can ultimately result in serious morbidity. Right posture doesn’t simply mean sitting up straight. Posture refers to the alignment of your spine with all its adjoining structures,” said Yash Gulati, Senior Consultant, Orthopaedics, Apollo Hospital.

Dr Gulati said improper posture disrupts the alignment of the spine which strains ligaments and muscles leading to chronic disabling back and neck pain.

“This, in turn disrupts alignment of other major bones and muscles, which can cause short-term pain or more long-term structural damage,” said Dr Gulati.

“Younger population is falling prey to bone and joint ailments because of wrong posture. No amount of exercise or therapy can undo 16 hours of bad posture a day. It is important to be mindful of bone health throughout your life,” added Dr Gulati.
Indian medical statistics say, India may become the osteoarthritis capital of the world with over 60 million cases by 2025, with youth being 40 per cent of it.

Vinay Gupta, Head of Orthopaedics at Saroj Super Speciality Hospital, said : “A person with good posture maintains proper alignment through all sitting, standing and lying positions. Failing to correct bad posture has significant implications for the skeletal system.”

“Bad posture is the major contributor to osteoarthritis. It disrupts the load bearing balance of the joints, connective tissue wears down, exposing bone to bone. Osteoarthritis is very painful and cannot be reversed,” said Dr Gupta.

Experts said that bone health is one of the many health concerns for women and men alike, and it is not restricted to the older generation.

They also emphasised that there is a need to educate people not only about the right posture but also ergonomic principles at home and place of work.

source”cnbc”

Wall Street is looking for a big rebound from what’s been a bad year

After six turbulent months, there’s good news for Wall Street banks, and there’s bad news.

The good news first: it’s likely getting better. Of course, that comes as big banks try to rebound from the bad news: It’s been the worst start to a year, on a number of metrics, since the global financial crisis.

Bankers say that despite the shock Brexit vote in late June, there are more corporate buyers weighing big M&A deals and more companies eyeing the IPO window after seeing signs of life in the U.S. market. Now, some market watchers have become hopeful that there will be more public offerings in the back half of 2016, and more big deals to prop up big banks’ top lines.

LeBron James

Getty Images
LeBron James

If investor wariness is pushing cash out of international markets, there’s hope that an influx of investment into the U.S. will foster more IPOs.

“It is easier for companies to get public when mutual funds have positive cash flows,” said Lise Buyer, partner with Class V Group, which works with pre-initial public offering start-ups. “You don’t have to be profitable, you have to paint a compelling picture of why you will be.”

The bad news is that IPO revenue for big banks is down to a level not seen since 2009, coming in the wake of the global financial crisis, according to data from Dealogic.

But that said, revenue to big banks on IPOs more than doubled from the first quarter to the second quarter of this year, Dealogic data indicates, rising from $405 million to $1 billion. And, recently, some market bulls have pointed to upbeat metrics, despite the turmoil that closed out the second quarter.

Fed Stress Test

What did the Fed’s stress testreveal?Wednesday, 29 Jun 2016 | 8:24 PM ET|03:34

And all of a sudden, there seems to be a big turning of the tide in terms of private companies’ sentiments regarding public markets. On Tuesday, snack maker Hostess charted its ambitions to complete its post-bankruptcy turnaround, announcing plans to make a public market debut through a reverse merger with a listed acquisition company. Also this week, the Wall Street Journal reported that iPhone production company Foxconn Interconnect Technology is aiming to raise up to $1 billion in an offering of its own.

All of this comes on the heels of the runaway success of software company Twilo’s initial public offering, which saw shares shoot up after its late June market debut.

Separately, there are signs that M&A may finally take off. After seeing a record number of transactions busted up by Washington regulators, big banks are probably reassured to see more mega-deals being considered by corporate boards. Blockbuster M&A deals includingBayer’s bid to buy out Monsanto could be followed by other large-scale mergers in sectors including pharmaceuticals, one banker said.

Part of what might be pushing corporate boards to weigh big purchases is the cheap debt expected to proliferate in the 2016 market, thanks to central bankers’ unease with raising rates in the immediate wake of June’s Brexit vote. And, elsewhere in the deal marketplace, bankers think that stalling Silicon Valley valuations could also push once-hot start-ups to consider selling out if the right offer arrives.

“In a post-Brexit world and a better but still discerning IPO market, you will see seller capitulation that results in accelerating tech M&A, including a few unicorns,” said Elgin Thompson, managing director at Digital Capital Advisors.

Do you have bad RAM? Here’s how to find out

DDR4 memory

Random Access Memory (RAM) wears out over time. If your PC frequently freezes, reboots, or brings up a BSOD (Blue Screen Of Death), bad RAM just might be the problem. Corrupt files can be another sign of bad RAM, especially when the corruption is found in files that you’ve used recently. Another possible symptom: The PC slows down considerably as you use it, but seems re-energized after a boot.

But don’t just pull out and replace all of your RAM sticks. You need to diagnose them. That way, you’ll know which stick (if any) is bad. And no, don’t try to replace individual chips on the stick.

Send your query to [email protected].]

Windows comes with its own memory diagnostic tool. Use the Search tool that came with your version of Windows (for instance, Start > Search in Windows 7, or the Cortana field next to the Start button in Windows 10). Search for memory and select Windows Memory Diagnostic.

In the resulting window, click Restart now and check for problems.

0324 memory diagnostic

Windows will shut down, and your computer will reboot into the memory diagnostic program. You don’t have to do anything but wait. When it’s done (just a few minutes), it will boot back into Windows.

Now comes the hard part.

Search for event and select Event Viewer.

In the Event Viewer’s left pane, expand Windows Logs and click System. Then right-clickSystem (yes, you have to click it and then right-click it) and select Filter current log.

0324 filter current log

This brings up a new dialog box. Pull down the Event source menu. It’s very long, so you’ll have to scroll down to find and then check MemoryDiagnostics-Results. Click OKto close the dialog box.

0324 memorydiagnostics results

Back in the Event Viewer, note the listings in the top middle section; there will probably only be two, even if the message at the top of the pane tells you that there are thousands.

0324 results

Double-click each one for information.

0324 detaioed results

If the viewer tells you you have a RAM problem (I didn’t), shut down your computer and remove all but one of the RAM sticks. Then reboot and repeat the testing. Repeat with each stick. That way, you’ll be sure of which stick—or sticks—need to be replaced.

Then read my article on researching what kind of memory to buy.[“source-gsmarena”]

Tyranny,preview:,Obsidian’s,branching,bad,guy,RPG,is,made,to,play,over,and,over

Tyranny

Last week Obsidian dangled the smallest scraps of a new project: Tyranny, a new isometric CRPG built in the Pillars of Eternity engine. A world where the battle between good and evil already took place, and evil won.

Here’s the trailer again, in case you need a refresher:

Pretty light on the details, eh? Luckily we got a half-hour demo of the project at GDC. The key takeaway: Tyranny might share the same engine as Pillars of Eternity, but that’s about all. This is a wild project.

You’re going to miss it all

Pillars of Eternity was built in the vein of the old Infinity Engine games—Baldur’s Gate and its sequel, Planescape Torment, Icewind Dale, et cetera. Loooooooooong RPGs, with some amount of player freedom within the confines of a fairly rigid plot.

Tyranny is not that. Talking to Obsidian, it sounds like Tyranny is actually more like…Alpha Protocol? Yes, the flawed-but-sort-of-brilliant third-person shooter Obsidian released in 2010. Bet you didn’t expect that to be relevant to an isometric CRPG.

Alpha Protocol was a bold experiment in branching storylines, though. Small details, changed by an errant word here, an incidental choice there. It’s this spirit which makes its way into Tyranny. Our demo focused on one little area: The village of Plainsgate. Or is it Halfgate?

Tyranny

As with most RPGs, the first thing you do in Tyranny is create your character. This isn’t some farmer-in-rags though, or an escaped prisoner. In Tyranny, you play as a “Fatebinder,” which Obsidian’s Brian Heins described to us as “kind of like Judge Dredd.” Said Heins, “You get to bring your brand of justice to the people you meet and you have the full weight of armies backing that authority. People don’t mess with you unless they think they can stand against you.”

But as part of creating your Fatebinder, you’re asked to make certain decisions which set the state of the world—events that occurred during the aforementioned war between good and evil. Thus the Plainsgate/Halfgate conundrum.

We played the same small section of the game through twice. In one, the village of Plainsgate was occupied by foreign armies, dusty but resplendent with its Bronze Age architecture. The various crises central to Tyranny’s plot had taken a toll on Plainsgate, but it looked like a pleasant-enough place. Your typical Infinity Engine city, really.

Tyranny

Flip to a different saved state, and Plainsgate became a very different place. It was the same town except, oh yeah, a massive chasm ran through the middle of the town and took half the buildings with it. Halfgate.

Again, according to Obsidian this is because of a choice made during character creation. Literally half of the town, and presumably some of the game’s quests, were removed.

Now, maybe Obsidian simply showed us the biggest, flashiest example in the game and everything else will pale in comparison. But Plainsgate/Halfgate is already more reactive than anything in Pillars of Eternity, and it seems like modularity is key to the whole experience here.

Factions, for instance. Factions in Pillars of Eternity don’t really do much. Being aligned with the Crucible Knights or The Dozens can be advantageous for certain quests, but doesn’t really change the way you play.

Tyranny

“Reputation in Tyranny is not just about whether a faction likes or hates you,” says Heins. “It also changes what abilities you have as a character. Sometimes, choosing to piss someone off will work out better for you in the long run than keeping them as a friend.”

This dovetails with Tyranny’s classless leveling system—more commonly known as “That system in the Elder Scrolls games.” Use a skill—be it sword fighting or talking to others or what have you—and you get better in it.

Every system demoed to us seemed designed for a game you replay—not just once but multiple times. And if this were a Pillars-sized, forty-to-sixty hour RPG I’d say that was crazy. Who has time for that?

But it’s not. Breaking with tradition once more, Obsidian says Tyranny is probably somewhere under or around twenty hours. In other words: It’s Alpha Protocol sized. Something you’re actually likely to replay.

Tyranny

Listen, I loved Pillars of Eternity. I had a great time with it, and it brought back fond memories of playing Baldur’s Gate fifteen years prior. Hell, it made its way onto our Game of the Year list for 2015.

Tyranny seems a great deal more experimental though, and it has me fascinated. Now that we’ve played the obligatory Infinity Engine throwback game, I’m excited to see Obsidian using its isometric tech for something wholly unique. Something that’s not constrained by prior notions about “what the interface should look like” or “what arc the player should follow.”

Oh, and I’m totally opting for Halfgate. Sure, I might miss out on some quests, but the village is amazing with a hole ripped through the center. Look for Tyranny at the end of 2016—barring the usual Obsidian delays, of course.

[“source-gsmarena”]

‘Bad Goldilocks’ emerges as market’s worst enemy

Remember “Goldilocks,” that pristine economic condition where growth was strong but not so strong as to induce tighter Fed policy? Well, now meet her evil twin.

This is the new state of affairs in the U.S., where growth isn’t strong enough to inspire much confidence but not weak enough to induce easing from the U.S. central bank.

It’s an uncomfortable place for investors, evidenced by a move away from stocks despite a strong week for the markets.

Read MoreGlobal economy faces a ‘five-finger discount’

Global equity funds surrendered a net $12.2 billion in outflows last week, the highest level of redemptions in five months and the seventh consecutive week of net outflows, according to Bank of America Merrill Lynch, whose chief investment strategist Michael Hartnett used the “bad Goldilocks” term to frame the current situation.

Source: The British Library

The outflows came amid a market that is up nearly 6 percent from at least a near-term intraday low hit Feb. 11, as measured by the S&P 500. Despite the market gains, investors remain leery over economic conditions, indicating the recent rally could be just a short squeeze likely to unravel.

Read MoreI don’t know what the bulls are smoking: Stockman

Mixed signals are the economy’s biggest problem: While consumers continue to spend and the jobs market looks solid, particularly in terms of weekly jobless claims, other aspects continue to underperform.

Manufacturing, exports and business investment numbers are weak, corporate profits are contracting, and estimates of recession chances are climbing. Revised numbers for fourth-quarter gross domestic product are likely to show growth of just 0.2 percent, less than the meager 0.7 percent initial estimate and perilously close to contraction, according to Credit Suisse economists.

“The U.S. economy has not been immune to the shocks emanating from global economic and financial market stress. Net export growth has slowed significantly, equipment spending is much softer, and businesses aren’t building inventories as fast as they might have otherwise,” Credit Suisse said in a note to clients. “However, … the domestic weakness to date has been concentrated mainly in specific pockets of the economy — especially those related to the energy sector.”

Wall Street’s efforts to ring-fence oil haven’t gone over well with investors. Worries are rising that the sector’s problems could bleed into other parts of the economy.

Read MoreHedge funds go bargain-hunting for energy stocks

Under some circumstances, it would be natural for investors to wonder whether the Fed might come to the rescue with some policy accommodation. In this case, though, that seems unlikely for a number of reasons.

Cleveland Fed President Loretta Mester on Friday expressed a widespread sentiment among policymakers, namely that the current weakness is bound to pass and there’s no reason to ease.

“At this point, I see the market volatility and sharp drop in oil prices as posing risks to the forecast, but I believe it is premature to conclude they necessitate a material change in my modal economic outlook,” Mester, a policy hawk, said in a speech.

It’s not that the Fed doesn’t have the tools, it’s more that deploying them at this point would look like a panic move from an institution that is trying to calm markets. (Some easing measures mentioned in recent days include negative rates on bank deposits at the Fed and additional rounds of quantitative easing or Operation Twist, a balance sheet-neutral round of Fed bond-buying.)

Indeed, it will be a thin line for the Fed to walk, with an economy that is showing some signs of inflationary pressures — Friday’s consumer price index gain among them — along with deflationary signs in energy and a wage picture that is somewhere between.

Bad Goldilocks, then, looks to be the nemesis ahead both for investors and central bankers.
[“source -cncb”]

‘Bad Goldilocks’ emerges as market’s worst enemy

Remember “Goldilocks,” that pristine economic condition where growth was strong but not so strong as to induce tighter Fed policy? Well, now meet her evil twin.

This is the new state of affairs in the U.S., where growth isn’t strong enough to inspire much confidence but not weak enough to induce easing from the U.S. central bank.

It’s an uncomfortable place for investors, evidenced by a move away from stocks despite a strong week for the markets.

Read MoreGlobal economy faces a ‘five-finger discount’

Global equity funds surrendered a net $12.2 billion in outflows last week, the highest level of redemptions in five months and the seventh consecutive week of net outflows, according to Bank of America Merrill Lynch, whose chief investment strategist Michael Hartnett used the “bad Goldilocks” term to frame the current situation.

Source: The British Library

The outflows came amid a market that is up nearly 6 percent from at least a near-term intraday low hit Feb. 11, as measured by the S&P 500. Despite the market gains, investors remain leery over economic conditions, indicating the recent rally could be just a short squeeze likely to unravel.

Read MoreI don’t know what the bulls are smoking: Stockman

Mixed signals are the economy’s biggest problem: While consumers continue to spend and the jobs market looks solid, particularly in terms of weekly jobless claims, other aspects continue to underperform.

Manufacturing, exports and business investment numbers are weak, corporate profits are contracting, and estimates of recession chances are climbing. Revised numbers for fourth-quarter gross domestic product are likely to show growth of just 0.2 percent, less than the meager 0.7 percent initial estimate and perilously close to contraction, according to Credit Suisse economists.

“The U.S. economy has not been immune to the shocks emanating from global economic and financial market stress. Net export growth has slowed significantly, equipment spending is much softer, and businesses aren’t building inventories as fast as they might have otherwise,” Credit Suisse said in a note to clients. “However, … the domestic weakness to date has been concentrated mainly in specific pockets of the economy — especially those related to the energy sector.”

Wall Street’s efforts to ring-fence oil haven’t gone over well with investors. Worries are rising that the sector’s problems could bleed into other parts of the economy.

Read MoreHedge funds go bargain-hunting for energy stocks

Under some circumstances, it would be natural for investors to wonder whether the Fed might come to the rescue with some policy accommodation. In this case, though, that seems unlikely for a number of reasons.

Cleveland Fed President Loretta Mester on Friday expressed a widespread sentiment among policymakers, namely that the current weakness is bound to pass and there’s no reason to ease.

“At this point, I see the market volatility and sharp drop in oil prices as posing risks to the forecast, but I believe it is premature to conclude they necessitate a material change in my modal economic outlook,” Mester, a policy hawk, said in a speech.

It’s not that the Fed doesn’t have the tools, it’s more that deploying them at this point would look like a panic move from an institution that is trying to calm markets. (Some easing measures mentioned in recent days include negative rates on bank deposits at the Fed and additional rounds of quantitative easing or Operation Twist, a balance sheet-neutral round of Fed bond-buying.)

Indeed, it will be a thin line for the Fed to walk, with an economy that is showing some signs of inflationary pressures — Friday’s consumer price index gain among them — along with deflationary signs in energy and a wage picture that is somewhere between.

[“source -cncb”]