Amazing benefits of curry leaves for hair and skin

curry leaves

Soft and flawless skin, clean and dandruff-free scalp, gorgeous hair… are the things of beauty every women long to have. Those who are naturally blessed with good skin and silky hair are lucky, but others struggle for it. There could be many easy solutions to having the crowning glory and lovely skin. Curry leave is one. Curry leaves not only add flavour to food, but it can also treat your skin and hair.

Rich in carbohydrates, fiber, calcium, phosphorous, irons and vitamins like vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin B, vitamin E, curry leaves help fight all kinds of infections, including skin infection. It can also treat premature greying of hair. Add curry leaves in your daily diet or try the following wonder tips for few weeks and see the result.

Skin: Rich in antioxidants, curry leaves can be used as a home remedy to treat common fungal infections of the nail or any body part that are often difficult to treat. Make a paste with lukewarm water and curry leaves and apply on the affected area. For dark spots and acne, add a pinch of turmeric to your curry leaves paste and apply the pack to your face.

Dandruff: Take five curry leaves and two to three tablespoon coconut oil. Heat them together. Once the mixture cools, apply it to the roots of your hair and leave it overnight. Wash it off with a mild shampoo.

Wrinkles: Soak curry leaves in a glass of water and leave it overnight. Drink it in the morning. The antioxidant properties in the leaves reduces fine lines and wrinkles and helps in premature ageing of the skin.

Hair: Using curry leaves in your food and drinks and washing your hair with curry leave water can give you healthy and lustrious hair. The amino acid, proteins and carotene content in it is said to stregnthen the follicles and protect the hair from falling. It also boost hair growth and strengthen the hair texture.

Use curry leaves to garnish your daily food, blend them and mix them with oil, boil or soak them in plain water to drink or wash your face and hair. All the nutrients present in it will treat your hai rand skin problems effectively.

 

[“source-thestatesman”]

Tips For Eye Health and Maintaining Good Eyesight

Image result for Representative Image (Photo courtesy: AFP Relaxnews/ Mauro-Matacchione/ Istock.com)Representative Image (Photo courtesy: AFP Relaxnews/ Mauro-Matacchione/ Istock.com)
It’s the age of technology and we are more than ever using our eyes to check our phones, computer screens, gaming consoles and televisions, which can lead to eye fatigue. Eat healthy, exercise regularly and more to take care of eyes, suggest experts.

Ophthalmologists guide you to follow some simple steps:

 Adequate sleep is essential for eye health and allows the eyes to repair and recover. Eight hours of sound sleep at night will go a long way in attaining better visual quality.

* Our eyes require multiple nutrients to function optimally. Vitamins and minerals along with green leafy vegetables and protein sources help to keep the eyes strong and sharp.

* Regular exercise not only keeps your body fit but also makes your eyes healthy by pumping more blood and oxygen to your eyes.

* A majority of office jobs require constant and direct glaring at the computer screen, making it difficult for your eyes. Make sure to take a break, every 20 minutes for at least 20 seconds.

* Regular physical exam at least twice a year will keep you aware and helps to take necessary action in time.

* Keep your eyes protected from exposure to harmful UV rays.

[“Source-news18”]

Athlete gets cancer. Athlete fights cancer. Repeat, again and again…

Image result for Athlete gets cancer. Athlete fights cancer. Repeat, again and again...It was on the morning of Good Friday in 2009 when the runner first met her cancer. She was a fifth-year senior at Minnesota, sitting in the lobby of a hotel in Tempe, Ariz., one day before a college track meet. The runner was born Gabriel Anderson, because her mom liked Biblical names and thought Gabriel evoked both strength and beauty. Plus, it would work fine for a boy or a girl, though the kids in elementary school ruthlessly truncated it to Gabe, which has stuck. One day she would marry a Gophers distance runner named Justin Grunewald and legally add an “e” to her first name, thus transforming into Gabriele Grunewald—but still Gabe to most outside her family. On this morning in Tempe, however, she was just an anxious 22-year-old waiting for a doctor’s phone call that would alter the course of her life.

Several days earlier she’d noticed a tiny bump below her left ear, and a doctor had performed a fine-needle aspiration to remove fluid. Grunewald remembers that procedure to this day because even with everything she has endured since, nothing has been more painful. The fluid was sent out for a biopsy, and Gabe kept training with her teammates, eventually flying off to Arizona. She was in good shape, ready at 22 to start a crowning college season in which she would finally win a Big Ten title, finally earn All-America, finally put up the numbers to launch a professional running career. Plus, it couldn’t be cancer. Just a few weeks earlier her mother, Laura, endured exploratory surgery for what doctors believed was advanced uterine cancer…only to learn post-surgery that she didn’t have cancer after all. The family had escaped. “I went from thinking my wife was going to die to everything is fine and dandy, all right there in a hospital waiting room,” says Gabe’s father, Kim. Life couldn’t be so cruel as to test them again—not this soon.

It was cancer. Gabe’s doctors told her she had adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), a rare form found primarily in the salivary glands that occurs in 3.5 out of every million cancer patients. (While there will be an estimated 255,180 new cases of breast cancer in 2017, only 1,200 to 1,300 people will be diagnosed with ACC.) “It’s a cancer most oncologists will never see,” says Naomi Fujioka, now Gabe’s primary oncologist at University of Minnesota Health.

She would need surgery to remove the tumor. In tears, Gabe told her coach, Gary Wilson, that she would seek another year of eligibility to achieve her goals, bureaucratic wrangling be damned. She then gathered her teammates by the hotel pool and shared the news. Ladia Albertson-Junkans, who 16 months earlier had lost her 49-year-old stepfather to Hodgkin’s lymphoma, was so shaken that she ran from the hotel in tears, a reaction she regrets to this day. Most of the others experienced it as a sudden first brush with mortality. “For those women,” says Wilson, “it was like hearing that one of [their] sisters had cancer.”

Gabe went back to her room and Googled ACC, and from dense paragraphs of scientific jargon one truth jumped off the screen: There is no standard of care. There are treatments and there is research, but there is nothing resembling a silver bullet. It is a whack-a-mole cancer that can be repeatedly swatted back into its hole, only to return in the same hole—or somewhere else—sometimes quickly or other times many years later. “It’s characterized by coming back,” says Fujioka. Gabe read all of this as “incurable.” She remembers that word; maybe it was on one of the web pages. “I thought, Well, that’s not good. What happens? People get this disease and just succumb to it?” She would later learn that curability is not binary, but something more nebulous, more intimate. She still applies the term incurable, but mostly as a means of dumbing down the complexity of her illness for laypeople, often media.

That weekend in Tempe, Gabe stayed with her team and 24 hours later ran a personal best of 4:22.87 in the 1,500 meters because it would have been a shame to let all that training go to waste. Later, back in Minnesota, she underwent a grueling six-hour surgery to remove the tumor and one of her six salivary glands, followed by two months of daily radiation treatments. It all marked the beginning of Gabe’s life with cancer, not the end. She couldn’t have known then just how challenging, how painful, how rewarding, how terrifying…how important that life would be.

*****

Grunewald’s last-place finish in the 1,500 national championship in June can less than a week after she spent four hours in the ER with a fever.
Rich Pedroncelli/AP

More than eight years later, on the evening of June 10, Gabe was one of 15 women fanned out across the pale-orange surface of the track at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, host of the Music City Distance Carnival meet. They stood at the top of the backstretch, where the 3¾ laps of the 1,500 meters begin, but a grove of live oak trees blotted out light from the towers that rose above the track, leaving the racers in a fuzzy half-darkness just before the gun. They would come off the line like ghosts emerging from the cornstalks in Field of Dreams. The day’s 87-degree heat had given way to a pleasant stillness, so sweet for racing. Grunewald lined up fourth from the inside, wearing a yellow racing top and a blue bottom.

Since that morning in Tempe, cancer had come back three times. First there was thyroid cancer in 2010, just a year after her initial diagnosis. This was an entirely different kind of cancer, which at first confused everybody (but which now seems like a footnote). In the days between those first two cancers, Gabe, now 31, had lived—and run—voraciously. She learned that ACC five-year survival rates are very high (approximately 89%), and she attacked those five years. “Just fit in everything I can,” Gabe says. She procured that extra year of eligibility and took a whopping 10 seconds off her 1,500-meter PR, down to 4:12.06. She finished second at the Big Ten championship, second at the NCAAs and scored a modest pro contract with Brooks. Justin was away at medical school, in Duluth, so she also stayed out a little later, drank a little more beer and a little more red wine, escaping and experiencing a life she’d avoided in her past. “Sometimes those nights ended in tears and drama,” she says, “because I would get emotional about everything.” She had surgery on the thyroid cancer that fall, followed by one treatment with radioactive iodine, and then she bounced back quickly.

The big cancer, ACC, stayed away for seven years, and in that time Gabe carved out a career as a solid professional middle-distance runner. She finished fourth in the 1,500 meters at the 2012 Olympic trials, ran a personal best in the same event in ‘13 (4:01.48; only 10 American women have ever run faster) and won the indoor 3,000-meter national title in ‘14.

Then the ACC came back last summer in the form of a cantaloupe-sized tumor that absorbed two thirds of her liver. Doctors took it out, leaving a 13-inch, purple fishhook-shaped scar on Gabe’s abdomen. Six months later, the ACC came back again, this time in the form of 12 small tumors on her liver. Multiple treatment options were considered, and rejected, before doctors prescribed a course of chemotherapy. Gabe delayed treatment to try to achieve the qualifying standard, 4:09.52, for last month’s U.S. national championships—that would be her goal for the year. Her season’s training had started late because of the abdomen surgery, but she was in respectable shape. Now she would have to hurry to qualify before chemo. “We were going to have to cram a lot of training into a short time, which is never a good thing,” said Gabe’s longtime professional coach, Dennis Barker.

She ran 4:20.17 in a May 5 race at Stanford, and then two weeks later, in Southern California, 4:12. It was as fast as she would run this year.

But Gabe did something else, too: She began to talk about her cancer with anyone who asked. She developed a short, digestible version of a long, complex story for reporters. She sat for hours for a mini-documentary funded in part by Brooks and in part by the American Cancer Society. She shared endlessly on Instagram and Twitter. (She also devoted multiple days to this story.) All of this was exhausting and did nothing to help Gabe in her pursuit of 4:09. “It was so far out of my comfort zone, and it was overwhelming,” Gabe would say later. “I was conflicted about how much I wanted to share, like if I didn’t talk about my cancer maybe it wouldn’t come back. But a lot of people are suffering from this. It was totally worth it.”

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Others agree. Alan Ho, a medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, has consulted on Gabe’s case, and he says he’s already seeing more attention paid to ACC “since Gabriele has been so generous in talking about it.” Gabe, meanwhile, has seen dozens of people reach out on social media, including a woman who raced against her in college and whose husband has ACC.

On the night of June 2, Gabe ran 4:17.75 and finished fourth in a 1,500- meter race at the Boston Boost Games in Somerville, Mass. Uneven pacing cost her, but she also felt lousy. She was to begin a first round of weekly chemotherapy for the liver tumors three days later. The window was closing. Minutes after the Somerville race, Gabe stood on the grass next to the track, goose bumps rising on her slender arms in 62-degree chill. “O.K., that’s it,” she said. “Time to for me to start treatment. Time to move on to the next thing.”

But she didn’t. On June 5 she spent four hours in a lounge chair at the Masonic Cancer Clinic at UM Hospital in Minneapolis while bags of Cisplatin and Vinorelbine were dripped into her bloodstream through an intravenous line in her left forearm. (Gabe’s chemotherapy regimen calls for weekly infusions on a three-week, on-on-off cycle; she will get at least four cycles, possibly six.) Then, four days later, she flew to Nashville to take one more crack at 4:09.

It did not go well. Unlike the Boston race, this one was evenly paced and relatively quick: 65 seconds at 400 meters and 2:12 at 800. Gabe stuck her nose in it for half a mile, then she imploded, falling off the back. She staggered across the line in 4:28.88, 12th among the 13 runners who finished; she’d last run that slow when she was a sophomore in college. Afterward, she dropped to all fours on the track and rolled onto her side, crying.

For nearly eight years—but more intensely over the last 10 months—she had woken every morning with voices in her head, defining her mortality. She was sad about exotic vacations she thought might never be taken and weddings that might be missed; she feared she might never be a mother but was grateful for a rich, short life. “I’ve lived my dreams, married my dream guy,” she says. She was by turns resigned (“Modern medicine and my faith will lead me to whatever ends up happening”) and willful (“No one knows how long I can survive this; I take that as a challenge”).

She was enduring it all while living and running, but the chemotherapy was one punch too many, and now she lay on the pebbled surface of Vanderbilt’s track, wasted beneath the lights. Sara Vaughn, one of Gabe’s best friends on the running circuit (where friendships are rare), helped her to her feet. “This is too hard,” Gabe said between sobs. “I can’t do this anymore.”

One day after the race at Vanderbilt, Gabe and Justin run an easy seven miles from their apartment in downtown Minneapolis, just west of the Mississippi River and in the shadow of the Vikings’ hulking new U.S. Bank Stadium. Gabe is still bothered by her performance. “I made an impulsive decision to spend $1,000 to fly to Nashville and [I ran] four twenty- eight,” she says, spitting out the time like it’s bad sushi. “I don’t want to make a joke of my sport. I mean, what am I doing?”

The athlete-with-cancer story is a familiar one. Athlete gets cancer. Athlete fights cancer. Athlete beats cancer. Or: Athlete loses fight and is mourned for battling bravely. But it is always more complicated than that. Gabe remembers the first time she got sick, in 2009, and then ran so fast afterward, with the word cancer in the first paragraph of every story. “I was being such a good cancer-survivor-runner,” she says, a little cynically, because back then she had no idea what lay ahead. All these years later, she is still battling her cancer with chemotherapy while trying to run footraces against fast, healthy opponents because it helps her feel alive and because maybe it will help others feel alive too.

Gabe is 5’ 6”, 110 pounds when she’s racing fit, rail thin and taut. Her face is elastic, twisting and scrunching to fit any mood. She is also feisty. In Nashville, Wilson, her old college coach, tried to console her, saying, “You’re inspiring so many people.” Gabe laughed: “I’m trying to inspire myself to be less of a dips—.” Now she adds, “I have no idea if I’m doing a good job of running on chemo. It’s such a strange, abstract concept.”

It’s another banality that some cancer patients fight harder than others and are rewarded with prolonged life, when in reality some are just less fortunate. That disclaimer aside, Gabe has always been the fighting type. She was raised in Perham, Minn., a town of 3,185 in the middle of the Lakes Region, 180 miles northwest of the Twin Cities. She’s the second of five children—three boys and two girls, the last two, twins—born to Kim and Laura, both 60, who met as teenagers in Grand Forks, N.D., and both graduated from the University of North Dakota.

The Andersons encouraged their children to play sports. Kim had been a state champion high school wrestler—Laura was a cheerleader; “that’s all we had,” she says—and in the winter he would take his kids ice fishing, six holes in the ice house and a bunch of tip-ups outside. Gabe was serious from the start. “I was not a popular kid,” she says. “I never even made homecoming court. It was a cutthroat competition.” Team sports were cutthroat too, and Gabe often saw her brothers succeed or fail based on the venomous whims of small-town sports politics. Running was the key that unlocked her spirit; she made the varsity track and cross country teams as a seventh grader and was competitive with the best small-school runners in the state. “With running, nobody could [choose not to] start me in a big game,” she says. “You got out of it what you put in.”

She didn’t have any boyfriends. “The boys in my town, they weren’t going anywhere,” she says. “They were going to [North Dakota State in] Fargo. Maybe. I didn’t want to go to Fargo.” Laura recalls, “Gabriele was much too strong for high school boys.” The guys on the cross-country team called her Grandma Gabe “because they were afraid to ask her out,” adds Caleb, one of her two older brothers.

Gabe didn’t win an individual state championship until the 800 meters in 2004, her senior year. In that race she upset the favorite by getting to the front and staying there, setting a three-second PR of 2:14.14. “She dominated that race,” says Jeff Morris, who coached Gabe her last two years at Perham High and saw what others would see later. “The word that describes her is grit. Every day she would push for faster workout paces. In her senior year I had her running with the boys.”

Gabe waffled on where to attend college. Her 2:14 brought late offers from some D-III and small D-I colleges, but she wanted to take a shot at Minnesota. Wilson, who had been coaching the Gophers since 1985, regularly sought to recruit home-state walk-ons with modest high school times, knowing some of them would prosper. He wrote Gabe several letters, inviting her to visit campus, but she kept stubbornly declining. “They were recruiting over me,” says Gabe. “They didn’t make me feel very wanted.” Wilson saw things differently. “I called her four or five times,” he says, “and she didn’t call me back. [Morris] told me to keep trying and I said, ‘No; this kid is a pain in the butt.’” Gabe finally traveled to Minneapolis that summer, spoiling for a fight. “God’s honest truth, before her foot even hit the floor inside my office I was thinking, This kid is tough. She walked in with an attitude, like, I’m gonna knock your head off.”

Gabe walked on at Minnesota with something to prove and she flourished. She ran on two Big Ten-champion cross-country teams and challenged for conference track titles in the 800 and 1,500 meters, before and after her first cancer. Albertson-Junkans remembers doing a workout with Gabe during their freshman year: a five- mile run, with the miles becoming progressively faster, before finishing with an all-out 800 meters on the track. “She would leave it out there in the 800,” says Albertson-Junkans, now an accomplished trail runner. “She had a willingness to dig deep and go to the most painful places. Most people back off. They get frightened. Gabe would embrace that discomfort and uncertainty.”

Wilson says, “I don’t want this to sound wrong, but she was resilient like a guy. Some women—and I love coaching women—will cry and say, ‘I hate you, coach.’ You could get in Gabe’s face, and she would stand there and take it. She was just, ‘O.K., I got it. Let’s go.’” Teammates remember the breadth of Gabe’s spirit. “Such a strong personality,” says Mallory Van Ness, who ran for three years with Gabe at Minnesota. “And a big karaoke fan. She’ll request Whitney Houston’s ‘I Wanna Dance With Somebody’ and get right up there.”

Her tactical strength was her kick. “She’s so fierce, so tough,” says Vaughn. “Not afraid to throw elbows or get gritty. So many times I would see her make a move at the end of a race and think, That’s the move I should have made.” But that strength was also her weakness. She would use her kick as an excuse for sitting just a stride too far out of the real race, or moving a second too late. Barker, her pro coach, says, “Physically, Gabe has everything it takes. The mental part was always a little harder. I’ve tried to get her to be more aggressive [earlier] in her races.”

Gabe made every U.S. championship 1,500-meter final from 2009 through, finishing as high as fourth in ’12 and fifth in ’14. She has had the misfortune of coming along in the same era as two of the best American milers in history: ’16 Olympic 1,500- meter bronze medalist Jenny Simpson and U.S. 1,500-meter record holder Shannon Rowbury. Those two have dominated the championship finals. It’s a tough room.

[“Source-si”]

Experimental gene-silencing drug from Alnylam and Sanofi shows strong results in hemophilia

Alnylam CEO John Maraganore aims to compete with what is expected to be a blockbuster hemophilia drug from Roche.

A

n experimental hemophilia drug developed by Alnylam Pharmaceuticals continues to staunch bleeding in patients followed for almost one year in an ongoing, mid-stage clinical trial, the company reported Monday.

The promising results could intensify an already heated competition to develop novel treatments for the inherited bleeding disorder. The Alnylam drug, developed in partnership with Sanofi, uses a technology called RNAi to shut down dysfunctional genes. It’s a promising approach that’s attracted billions in research dollars, but hasn’t yet been used in an actual drug approved for sale.

The company says the new data support its recent decision to advance its RNAi hemophilia drug —  known as fitusiran —  into phase 3 clinical trials. If it succeeds, the drug could potentially compete against an expected blockbuster hemophilia drug from Roche.

In the current study, 33 patients have been injected once a month with fitusiran. The results so far: 48 percent have not bled after a median observation period of 11 months, according to data reported Monday at the International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis Congress in Berlin. Some patients in the study have been followed for up to 20 months.

Before starting the study, patients were reporting a median of 20 bleeding events per year. That number was reduced to 1 following the fitusarin injections.

The patients have two types of the disease, hemophilia A and B. Fourteen of the patients have inhibitors —  immune system antibodies that interfere with clotting factors commonly used to treat hemophilia. Patients with inhibitors are the hardest to treat effectively.

For this group, the median annualized bleed rate fell from 38 to zero, although the median observation period was shorter at six months.

Sixty-four percent of the inhibitor patients have not bled since starting treatment with fitusiran.

“These are really encouraging numbers,” said Alnylam Chief Medical Officer Pushtal Garg, in a phone interview from Berlin on Sunday. “To show annual bleed rates of one and zero is remarkable, particularly for a treatment that is administered once per month with a subcutaneous, low-volume injection.”

One third of the fitusiran-treated patients in the study reported elevated liver enzymes, a possible signal of liver toxicity, though all these patients also had hepatitis C, Alnylam said. One patient with increased liver enzymes stopped participating in the study; the rest had no symptoms and their liver enzyme issues were resolved.

There were no blood clots reported by patients in the fitusiran study. That could help the drug stand apart from Roche’s hemophilia drug emicizumab, which had a handful of serious blood clots reported in its phase 3 studies.

Roche intends to submit emicizumab for approval this year to treat hemophilia A patients with inhibitors to standard therapy. Sixty-three percent of patients receiving emicizumab reported zero treated bleeds compared with 6 percent of patients treated with bypassing agents, according to phase 3 study results previously announced. (Those results were also presented Monday at the Berlin meeting and published in the New England Journal of Medicine.)

Some analysts have projected emicizumab’s peak sales could hit $2 billion per year for patients with inhibitors, although that figure is hotly debated given the drug’s blood clotting safety issue. This leaves a potential opening for fitusiran, though its phase 3 trial won’t report data until 2019.

The Roche drug may eventually have other competition, too. Biomarin Pharmaceuticals, Spark Therapeutics, and Uniqure are all developing gene therapies to treat — and potentially cure — hemophilia.

Hemophilia drug franchises from Shire and Novo Nordisk are at risk of losing billions of dollars in sales if these new hemophilia drugs are approved. Though there are just 20,000 patients with hemophilia in the U.S., it’s a highly lucrative market.

On Sunday, Shire took the unusual step of fighting back with a preliminary injunction from a German court against Roche. Shire accused Roche of disseminating “inaccurate and misleading” information about the safety and serious adverse events that occurred in the phase 3 clinical trial of emicizumab, according to Reuters. In a statement, Roche said it stood behind the emicizumab data.

Alnylam, which is based in Cambridge, Mass., develops drugs that work through a process called RNA interference, or RNAi. All of its drugs, including fitusiran, are snippets of genetic code known as RNA that turn off genes producing disease-causing proteins. Fitusiran blocks the production of antithrombin, a protein made in the liver that prevents blood from clotting. Monthly injections of fitusiran reduce antithrombin in patients and increase corresponding levels of thrombin, another protein that promotes blood clotting.

Last October, Alnylam shares fell sharply after another of its RNAi drugs caused more deaths than a placebo in a phase 3 study. Work on that drug was halted.

But Alnylam shares have recovered this year, up 125 percent to date, on renewed investor optimism for its late-stage drug pipeline, including another RNAi drug, patisiran, targeting a rare nerve disease.

At Friday’s $84.08 close, Alnylam carries an almost $8 billion market valuation. It doesn’t yet have a drug on the market, which means investors are giving the company a lot of credit already for its late-stage RNAi pipeline, including fitusarin.

[“Source-statnews”]

I went on the Silicon Valley diet craze that encourages butter and bacon for 2 months – and it vastly improved my life

Image result for I went on the Silicon Valley diet craze that encourages butter and bacon for 2 months - and it vastly improved my lifeA diet that goes against conventional wisdom on healthy eating is gaining momentum among Silicon Valley tech workers. And it involves eating a lot of fat.

The ketogenic (or “keto”) diet – which first became popular in the 1920s as a treatment for epilepsy and diabetes – limits carbohydrates to no more than 50 grams a day, which is the rough equivalent of a plain bagel or a cup of white rice. By comparison, dietary guidelines laid out by the USDA recommend consuming between 225 and 325 grams of carbs a day.

On the keto diet, the body goes into starvation mode and taps its own fat stores for fuel. Studies suggest the low-carb, high-fat diet may promote weight loss , dull hunger , and stave off age-related diseases. More research is needed on its long-term effects, especially in healthy people.

An increasing number of health nuts – from internet entrepreneur Kevin Rose tp podcaster Tim Ferriss – swear by the keto diet. I spent the last two months eating bacon, butter, and avocado to see why the keto movement is so popular.

[“Source-businessinsider”]

 

Yoga And Its Therapeutic Benefits For Kids

Image result for Yoga And Its Therapeutic Benefits For KidsRepresentative Image (Image: PTI)
Yoga unfolds many benefits for adults as well for kids. With today’s lifestyle and pedagogy, it’s important to take special care for a healthy body and a peaceful mind at their young age. If our children become aware about the benefits of yoga and adopt it from an early age, they can live much healthy and strong life, indeed.
Kids can significantly benefit from yoga in many ways, and in some ways even more than it foster adults. To list a few, following are the benefits of yoga for kids:
1.Concentration: By learning some breathing exercises kids can bring tremendous change in their concentration level and hence, they can focus better on their short term as well as long term goals.

2.Improves flexibility and strengthens the body: Yoga further enhances the innate flexibility of kids. It also helps in strengthening the body which results in fewer injuries, especially when kids are involved in sports activities.

3.Keep Calm: We might not be aware but our kids sometime deal with lot of frustration and agitation. So why wait for them to land up in such unwanted situation and then try to pull them out of it. Instead, we should encourage them to do yoga so that they can learn how to keep calm beforehand to know how to react appropriately in any situation.

4.Mindful exercise: Children learn to guide their bodies through different poses, henceforth they learn more about their minds and how they can it affect their attitude and approach towards their life.

5.Positivity: Positivity is something we all yearn for, still with minimal efforts we try to bring it in our lives. Yoga helps children to love themselves and others, as they are and also to keep their calm. Thus, a body full of positivity emerges out of the young ones.

6.Discipline and Responsibility: Learning yoga makes kids more disciplined and responsible in their life. Therefore, we can expect better academic results and focused career from them.

These are just some of the benefits of yoga for children. Just encourage your child to practice yoga regularly, may be practice together while watching certain Yoga poses from the internet and see what change it can bring in your child’s life; a change that you and your child would always cherish!

[“Source-news18”]

I Tried A Diet And Fitness Plan Based On My DNA And Couldn’t Believe The Results

 My name is Daysha, and I have always struggled with my weight.

Growing up, my weight fluctuated a lot. At one point in my life, I developed disordered eating habits. After recovering and practicing a lot of self-love, I found the problem then became that I never saw the same results that I did when I was starving myself.

It’s not that I don’t enjoy working out and eating healthy, because I do.

I love cooking healthy meals and I dance four to five times per week. I have always been frustrated with why it's so hard for me to lose weight. I tried all sorts of methods to lose weight and get fit, including a raw vegan diet, Weight Watchers, seeing a dietitian, doing a soup cleanse, P90X, and even getting a personal trainer. Nothing seemed to work for me.

BuzzFeedVideo

I love cooking healthy meals and I dance four to five times per week. I have always been frustrated with why it’s so hard for me to lose weight. I tried all sorts of methods to lose weight and get fit, including a raw vegan diet, Weight Watchers, seeing a dietitian, doing a soup cleanse, P90X, and even getting a personal trainer. Nothing seemed to work for me.

I started to believe that maybe it’s just my genetics.

Not ever seeing results discouraged me so much to the point that I wanted to just give up. It turned into a continuous cycle of embarking on a new diet or fitness plan, not seeing any real change after a few months, and then just giving up again.

BuzzFeedVideo

Not ever seeing results discouraged me so much to the point that I wanted to just give up. It turned into a continuous cycle of embarking on a new diet or fitness plan, not seeing any real change after a few months, and then just giving up again.

Then I found out about this thing called FitnessGenes and took a DNA test.

FitnessGenes is a genetic testing company that develops personalized fitness and nutrition plans based on an individual's DNA. I met with Dr. Dan Reardon, the CEO/cofounder, and took a DNA test. The results took one month to process. When I finally got them back, I was shocked.

BuzzFeedVideo

FitnessGenes is a genetic testing company that develops personalized fitness and nutrition plans based on an individual’s DNA. I met with Dr. Dan Reardon, the CEO/cofounder, and took a DNA test. The results took one month to process. When I finally got them back, I was shocked.

I sat down with Dr. Dan to learn more about my genetics and how my body works. Here’s what I learned:

1. My suspicion was correct. Genetically, I do have a slower metabolism. Dr. Dan described this in scientific terms as an "efficient metabolism," meaning that I store energy more than someone with a fast or "inefficient metabolism." 2. I also have a gene variation for the FTO gene that is linked to a hormone called ghrelin, which controls hunger. My gene variation implies that I am someone who becomes hungry very easily, therefore creating a higher risk of overeating. Dan said that eating small, frequent meals throughout the day to control hunger would be important. 3. I also have a gene variation in the APOA2 gene, indicating that I am sensitive to saturated fats, meaning that it sticks to me more easily! I asked Dr. Dan what foods have saturated fats and he said things like animal products, butter, dairy products, palm oil, and coconut oil. Coconut oil?! I ate so much coconut oil because of how often it's promoted as a healthy oil. No wonder I was having trouble.4. I am someone who would benefit from working out later in the day because my CLOCK gene variations imply that I am a night owl. This made perfect sense because I am definitely not a morning person.5. I am someone who responds well to "high-volume training," meaning high sets and reps of weight training. I always thought that lots of cardio would be the key to losing weight. It turns out that it was going to take a lot of strength training. Dan said that the more muscle I built, the more fat I would burn. 6. I am someone who does not switch from burning carbohydrates to burning fat easily. This would mean that I would need to be eating the right balance of macronutrients: carbs, protein and fat.7. Dan also said that I have a gene variation that indicates I metabolize caffeine slowly. This means that I would benefit by having a cup of green tea about 30 minutes prior to a workout for optimal energy.

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1. My suspicion was correct. Genetically, I do have a slower metabolism. Dr. Dan described this in scientific terms as an “efficient metabolism,” meaning that I store energy more than someone with a fast or “inefficient metabolism.”

2. I also have a gene variation for the FTO gene that is linked to a hormone called ghrelin, which controls hunger. My gene variation implies that I am someone who becomes hungry very easily, therefore creating a higher risk of overeating. Dan said that eating small, frequent meals throughout the day to control hunger would be important.

3. I also have a gene variation in the APOA2 gene, indicating that I am sensitive to saturated fats, meaning that it sticks to me more easily! I asked Dr. Dan what foods have saturated fats and he said things like animal products, butter, dairy products, palm oil, and coconut oil. Coconut oil?! I ate so much coconut oil because of how often it’s promoted as a healthy oil. No wonder I was having trouble.

4. I am someone who would benefit from working out later in the day because my CLOCK gene variations imply that I am a night owl. This made perfect sense because I am definitely not a morning person.

5. I am someone who responds well to “high-volume training,” meaning high sets and reps of weight training. I always thought that lots of cardio would be the key to losing weight. It turns out that it was going to take a lot of strength training. Dan said that the more muscle I built, the more fat I would burn.

6. I am someone who does not switch from burning carbohydrates to burning fat easily. This would mean that I would need to be eating the right balance of macronutrients: carbs, protein and fat.

7. Dan also said that I have a gene variation that indicates I metabolize caffeine slowly. This means that I would benefit by having a cup of green tea about 30 minutes prior to a workout for optimal energy.

Instead of counting calories, I tracked my macronutrients.

Dan said it would be important to have 1,700–1,900 calories maximum per day, since I am someone with a slow metabolism. However, instead of counting calories, which had put me in a negative headspace in the past, I tracked my macronutrients every day using this whiteboard. Macronutrient breakdown Carbohydrates: 40% Protein: 30% Fat: 30% (less than 8% coming from saturated fats, and the main source coming from monounsaturated fats. This would include foods such as almonds, olive oil, avocado, sesame oil, and canola oil.)

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Dan said it would be important to have 1,700–1,900 calories maximum per day, since I am someone with a slow metabolism. However, instead of counting calories, which had put me in a negative headspace in the past, I tracked my macronutrients every day using this whiteboard.

Macronutrient breakdown

Carbohydrates: 40%

Protein: 30%

Fat: 30% (less than 8% coming from saturated fats, and the main source coming from monounsaturated fats. This would include foods such as almonds, olive oil, avocado, sesame oil, and canola oil.)

I learned how to create meals that were delicious and healthy for my body.

The 30-day plan was easy to follow, but it did take a lot of hard work.

I worked out with Dan three to four times per week doing strength training and high-intensity interval training (HIIT). I had two active recovery days and also took a brisk walk every morning. Yes, there were times when I wanted to quit, but I felt stronger and stronger as the time went by. It motivated me even more to continue.

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I worked out with Dan three to four times per week doing strength training and high-intensity interval training (HIIT). I had two active recovery days and also took a brisk walk every morning. Yes, there were times when I wanted to quit, but I felt stronger and stronger as the time went by. It motivated me even more to continue.

I couldn’t have done it without a strong support system.

I was lucky enough to have friends who were invested in me and seeing me succeed. They were even willing to work out with me!

After 30 days, I could not believe the results!

I didn't weigh myself the entire 30 days, because I didn't want to be discouraged by the numbers. Instead, I focused on how I was feeling. I had more energy than I have ever had before! In the end, it really wasn't about the numbers for me. I just wanted to be the healthiest, happiest version of myself.

BuzzFeedVideo

I didn’t weigh myself the entire 30 days, because I didn’t want to be discouraged by the numbers. Instead, I focused on how I was feeling. I had more energy than I have ever had before! In the end, it really wasn’t about the numbers for me. I just wanted to be the healthiest, happiest version of myself.

Although I lost weight and body fat, it was never about the numbers for me. I came out of this experience a different person on the inside, and that is what matters to me the most.

This experience allowed me to trust my body more than I ever have. I realized that I was always caught in this mindset that I was somehow "broken," and that nothing would ever work for me. In reality, I just needed to learn more about my body and how I function as an individual. We live in a culture where everyone is trying to tell you what's healthy, and this gave me the peace of mind to know what's actually healthy for my own body. This is only the beginning for me!

BuzzFeedVideo

This experience allowed me to trust my body more than I ever have. I realized that I was always caught in this mindset that I was somehow “broken,” and that nothing would ever work for me. In reality, I just needed to learn more about my body and how I function as an individual. We live in a culture where everyone is trying to tell you what’s healthy, and this gave me the peace of mind to know what’s actually healthy for my own body. This is only the beginning for me!

FitnessGenes is offering a 20% discount for BuzzFeed users using code BUZZFEED at checkout. Follow this link.

Special thanks to Granite Gym and Sanctuary Fitness LA for use of their facilities.

[“Source-buzzfeed”]

Bateman Skincare Is a Brand For Handsome Young Men Who Are Young and Handsome

Image result for Bateman Skincare Is a Brand For Handsome Young Men Who Are Young and HandsomeYou know how pretty much every pop culture film is being made into a musical? Imagine that… but now with beauty. Instead of breaking scenes down into dance-y numbers and jazz hands, the concept is translated into one thematic element, this one being skin care.

Bateman Skincare takes its name from the titular character in American Psycho, Patrick Bateman. The 1991 Brett Easton Ellis novel turned year-2000 film, now turned conceptual skin care line is a highly edited collection of your six essential products: a rose hip and seaweed cleanser, an herbal balancing toner, AHA exfoliating gel, hyaluronic serum, hyaluronic moisturizer, and a zinc + clay mask.

I would imagine that a psychopathic narcissist would absolutely follow a six-plus-step skin-care routine, but Bateman Skincare errs more general; the brand claims a unisex approach to skin care that focuses on the individual, You are your own best asset printed on their card. “One of the most memorable parts of the book and movie revolves around skincare and the importance of having a routine; this adherence to structure is a cornerstone of our brand.” It also happens to be the cornerstone of any good skin-care regimen that you expect to see results from.

The line is modestly packaged in clinical amber bottles and dare I say, vaguely early 90s-typeface (I don’t know. I’m a beauty editor, not a graphic designer). Judging by the products’ ingredients, however, it all seems fairly legit from a glance — simple pared-down formulas with botanically-derived ingredients featuring face-faves, hyaluronic acid, squalene, seaweed, rose hip seed oil and witch hazel.

I asked a cosmetic chemist (who asked to remain unnamed) his opinion about the line and he gave it a blasé thumbs-up. “I don’t think this line will help much with someone with acne or any specific skin concerns. I think it’s aimed more to handsome young men who are already handsome and young.”

… Kind of like the chiseled Mr. Bateman himself, who now that I think about it, is a bit parallel to the prototypical Glossier girl… but a dude — conventionally attractive, naturally fit, and effortlessly chic yet with a staunchly disciplined focus on grooming aesthetics that gives the appearance of effortlessness.

However in an ironic yet pleasant turn, Bateman Skincare products are cruelty-free, unlike the guy it’s based on.

[“Source-allure”]

‘Yoga Ganga’ of Chandigarh Police Police: Poster boys spread message of health and yoga

The Chandigarh Police has witnessed deaths of several police personnel due to heart attack, sugar and diabetes. Some policemen have suffered brain stroke and paralysis attack in the recent past.

At a time when Chandigarh Police personnel have been repeatedly found suffering from different diseases, including high blood pressure, diabetes, uric acid, cholesterol and weak eyesight during different health checkup camps, the police department has decided to explain them the virtues of yoga. In this regard, the police have released a poster called ‘Yoga Ganga’ featuring its three senior officers who are shown performing different yoga asanas.

These senior police officers are DIG Alok Kumar, SSP Eish Singhal and DSP Ram Gopal. “Eight other police personnel, including five women constables, are also featured in the poster doing different asanas. But we decided to display the pictures of senior police officers on top of the poster to motivate police personnel and to show seriousness of the police department towards health fitness,” a senior police officer said.

The poster was released on International Yoga Day but it was distributed and displayed at different police stations and Chandigarh Police headquarters in Sector 9 on Friday. While DIG Alok Kumar is shown performing Vajraasan and SSP Eish Singhal Utanmandukasan, DSP Ram Gopal is shown doing Padmasana (lotus position).

Significantly, DSP Ram Gopal has been an international level yoga practitioner and DIG Alok Kumar has been practising yoga for the last one decade. Sources said, “Once there was a plan to put DGP Tajender Singh Luthra on the poster while performing asanas but the idea did not materialise. The posters were distributed to all the police stations, police posts and different cells including crime branch and operations cell.”

In March 2017, a health checkup camp for police personnel especially deployed at police stations, crime branch, operations cell was held and 55 police personnel out of 90 were found suffering from different ailments, including hypertension, high BP, cholesterol and diabetes. A total of 80 cops were found affected from calcium deficiency, 40 were found diabetic, and 60 were found suffering from hypertension out of a total 200 cops in May 2016.
DIG Alok Kumar said, “The poster was released on International Yoga Day. Our aim is to make police personnel health-conscious.”

The Chandigarh Police has witnessed deaths of several police personnel due to heart attack, sugar and diabetes. Some policemen have suffered brain stroke and paralysis attack in the recent past.

[“Source-indianexpress”]

Drug information leaflets are ‘impenetrable’ and ‘unreadable’: Medicine pamphlets must be improved so patients can understand them, report claims

Drug information leaflets must be improved so they can be more easily read and understood, a report claims.

The Academy of Medical Sciences has called for the pamphlets that come in medicine boxes to be made clearer to ensure ‘comprehension and readability’ for patients.

Drug leaflets should also include information on the benefits of taking a medicine, and not just a ‘laundry list’ of the potential harms, it adds in its report.

Professor John Tooke, chair of the report, said: ‘The patient information leaflet does not provide a balanced appraisal of the benefits and harms of medicines and was described in our public dialogue as being “impenetrable” and “unreadable”.’

The Academy has released a series of potential questions that the public can ask their doctor to help them make an informed decision about whether to take certain medicines.

Drug information leaflets must be improved so they can be easily understood, experts claim

Drug information leaflets must be improved so they can be easily understood, experts claim

Unclear information leaflets 

Professor Tooke said: ‘The one piece of information that patients are guaranteed to receive – the patient information leaflet – does not provide a balance appraisal of the benefits and harms of medicines and was described in our public dialogue as being “impenetrable” and “unreadable”.

‘As far as patient information leaflets are concerned there is currently an obligation for industry to expose the risks, which is why they predominate this laundry list of side effects.

‘That’s a regulatory requirement and we’re saying that the regulation needs to serve the user and therefore what they need too is a balanced view of the potential harms and benefits.’

The Academy recommends patients ask their doctor questions, such as ‘How will this medicine make me feel? Will it affect my daily life?’, to aid their decision-making regarding whether to take certain medications, the BBC reported.

Patients trust friends more than science

The report, released yesterday, also revealed patients are more likely to trust the opinions of their family and friends than the results of clinical trials when it comes to the safety and effectiveness of their medication.

The Academy surveyed 2,041 members of the public and 1,013 GPs about their attitudes towards medical research.

Results revealed that 63 per cent of the public and 82 per cent of GPs are sceptical of claims made by drugs trials.

Many have major doubts following a series of scares over the safety of hormone replacement therapy (HRT), cholesterol-lowering statins and the antiviral drug Tamiflu.

The findings also demonstrate just 37 per cent of the public trust evidence from medical research, while 65 per cent value the opinion of friends and family.

Perhaps surprisingly, 82 per cent of GPs believe medical research is biased in favour of drugs appearing effective and safe.

Just 37 per cent of the public trust medical research, yet 65 per cent value friends' advice  

Just 37 per cent of the public trust medical research, yet 65 per cent value friends’ advice .

Risks of unclear information 

Sir John Tooke, report chairman, said: ‘We all need medicines at some point in our life yet the decision as to whether to use a drug or not can be a confusing one as illustrated by numerous controversies played out in recent years – in relation to the use of statins to reduce the risk of strokes and heart disease; the risks and benefits associated with hormone replacement therapy and Tamiflu in the treatment of influenza.

‘Questions raised about the risk and benefit balance of being on statins were associated with large numbers of people stopping the drugs from which it has been inferred there could be 2,000 excess strokes and heart attacks over the next 10 years in the UK, so there can be health consequences from the result of confusion.

‘It is our view that unless we improve the use of scientific evidence to judge the potential harms and benefits of medicines, both established and new, patients will not reap the full advantage of scientific advance.’

He said: ‘It’s startling to hear that only about a third of the public trust medical research.

‘Patients are struggling to make sense of the information they receive from their doctor, the TV, the internet and their friends and family about medicines.

‘With our ageing population and ever more sophisticated treatments being made available, we need to act now to give patients clearer and more useful information about the medicines they take.’

Why the confusion? 

As well as the ongoing debate about whether the insomnia and muscle weakness side effects of statins outweigh its cholesterol-lowering properties, there is similar confusion regarding HRT  for the menopause and whether it causes breast cancer.

The NHS has claimed the benefits outweigh the risk, yet surveys have shown the majority of women are still very sceptical.

In addition, research published back in 2009 claimed that ‘more than half of children taking Tamiflu to combat swine flu suffer side effects such as nausea, insomnia and nightmares’.

Professor Dame Sally Davies, the Chief Medical Officer for England, said: ‘Medical science is progressing at an unprecedented rate, opening up opportunities not only to cure certain diseases but potentially to prevent them ever occurring.

‘It is vital that we find the best possible ways to use and communicate scientific evidence, so that progress may be translated into benefits for patients.’

[“Source-ndtv”]