A Top Dermatologist Shares Her Secret for Looking 30 in Her 40s

For 44-year-old Louisville, KY, dermatologist Tami Buss Cassis, MD, there’s one go-to treatment that she personally relies on to keep her skin looking youthful and fresh. “Just like everyone else, I have the normal aging skin worries: fine lines, wrinkles, brown spots, larger pore sizes and sunken eyes.” As a skin care expert, Dr. Cassis has access to a multitude of noninvasive options for facial rejuvenation. To treat her own skin, she chooses microneedling as an easy and effective way to treat the common signs of aging, leaving her with a complexion that makes her look more than a decade younger than her actual age.

 


Before the Treatment

Using a small, roller-like device with tiny needles, microneedling works by making miniscule holes spaced apart in a given area of your skin. This creates a controlled skin injury that your body will respond to by sending collagen and elastin to heal the entire area. “When the trauma happens to the skin, it is forcing collagen remodeling,” says Dr. Cassis. “There is some slight pain associated with it, so we make patients sit with numbing cream about 20-30 minutes before the procedure. But beyond that, it’s a very safe, effective and fast treatment. The procedure takes about 30 minutes. Afterward your skin is very raw, swollen and a little bloody. You will have very specific skin care instructions to follow after the procedure. Sun avoidance is an absolute must!”


Immediately After the Microneedling Treatment

The collagen and elastin heals the damaged area and smooths out minor scars, flattens out fine lines and wrinkles, and promotes elasticity in the skin. “I love the glow it gives my skin,” adds Dr. Cassis. “My brown spots have diminished, and under the layers of skin that peeled off after my treatment, I can see an improvement in my fine lines.”


8 Days Post-Procedure

“My after picture was taken eight days after the procedure, and I am very happy with results,” says Dr. Cassis. “Most people will need a series of three treatments about a month apart. Results are ongoing and it really depends on what you are trying to treat. It’s a great option for acne scars, wrinkles and hyperpigmentation.”

The cost for a microneedling treatment varies by the physician, geographic region and the complexity of the procedure (some use radio frequency, platelet-rich plasma and special serums). “In Kentucky, the cost is about $300, plus the cost of the post-op care, which is about $100,” says Dr. Cassis. “Everyone will react differently, so make sure you are having this done in a board-certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon’s office.”

 

 

[“source-newbeauty”]

MINUTE OF EXERCISE A DAY COULD PREVENT OSTEOPOROSIS, FINDS STUDY

woman-exercise-minute-bone-density.jpg

No more excuses

Many people think that getting fit means devoting your life to the gym and slogging it out for hours. And unsurprisingly, that can be pretty off-putting.

But increasingly we’re realising that short workouts can be much more effective than long ones, if you just know what to do.

It turns out that just a minute’s exercise a day can have a hugely beneficial impact on your health.

According to a study by the Universities of Exeter and Leicester, women who do 60-120 seconds of high-intensity weight-bearing exercise a day have four per cent better bone density than those who do less than a minute.

Women who exercise for over two minutes have even stronger bones, with density six per cent higher than those who do under a minute.

After the age of 30, people tend to lose more bone mass than they gain, and the higher your bone density, the lower your likelihood of developing osteoporosis.

You’re also less likely to have bone fractures in old age.

The study was conducted on over 2,500 female participants, and it’s women who are most at risk of osteoporosis, with bone density declining significantly after the menopause.

According to the International Osteoporosis Foundation, a tenth of women aged 60 are affected by osteoporosis, and this rises to two-thirds of women aged 90.

What’s more, one in three women over the age of 50 and one in five men of the same age will suffer from osteoporotic fractures.

But further research needs to be done to work out how best one should undertake exercise in order to improve bone density the most.

“We don’t yet know whether it’s better to accumulate this small amount of exercise in bits throughout each day or all at once, and also whether a slightly longer bout of exercise on one or two days per week is just as good as one to two minutes a day,” said lead author Dr Victoria Stiles.

“But there’s a clear link between this kind of high-intensity, weight-bearing exercise and better bone health in women.”

To reach their conclusions, the researchers asked their participants to wear activity monitors for a week and then compared this data to measurements of their bone health.

The activity data was broken down into single seconds to understand how people move in their daily lives.

“We wanted to make every second count in our analysis, because short snippets of high-intensity activity are more beneficial to bone health than longer, continuous periods,” Stiles said.

“We were careful not to ignore short bursts of activity throughout the day.”

Many people, although not consciously exercising, engage in non-exercise activity thermogenesis – or NEAT – over the course of the day, and this can be enough to improve your health.

If you want to increase your bone health, start with simply trying to walk more, and from there you can incorporate short bouts of running too.

There are limitations to the study’s findings though.

“Because this is a cross-sectional study – which assesses data taken from a subset of the population at a particular point in time – we can’t be sure whether the high-intensity physical activity led to better bone health, or whether those with better bone health do more of this exercise,” Stiles clarified.

“However, it seems likely that just one to two minutes of running a day is good for bone health.”

It’s not the first study to suggest you can drastically improve your health with just a minute’s exercise either: earlier this year, researchers from McMaster University found that 60 seconds of intense exercise broken up into 20 second blasts as part of a ten-minute workout can be as effective as a 45 minute endurance workout.

No more telling yourself you just don’t have the time to keep fit then.

[“Source-independent”]

A progressive approach to drug addiction

Instead of overlooking the true issue of drug addiction in Chatham-Kent and participating in the stigma that surrounds it, our community must be proactive. Now is our opportunity to help individuals suffering from drug addiction and prevent needless overdoses while simultaneously protecting public health.

Last year in Canada there were 2458 opioid related overdose deaths (two every day in Ontario), all which were preventable. Some readers may turn a blind eye to this statistic and argue, “who cares?” and “better for the rest of us”. My question for those people is, when did we lose our sense of community? When did we become so individualistic that our judgment of others has clouded our ability to feel empathy?

With the recent amendments to Bill C-37 put in place by our Liberal government, which makes the process of applying for safe consumption sites easier, now is the time to counterattack the rising opioid trend and provide drugs users with a safe injection site.

Opioid use in Chatham-Kent affects a significant portion of our population and heavier drugs such as heroin and methamphetamine are becoming the norm. Before this trend escalates, we must follow the lead of our major Canadian cities (Vancouver and Toronto) and advocate for a safe consumption site in Chatham-Kent to provide a more progressive approach to drug addiction.

“Insite”, which is the name of Vancouver’s site, last year alone had 1,781 overdose interventions saving the lives of suffering individuals. Yes, they are suffering. Because of the stigma that surrounds drug addiction, this may seem like a waste of money and resources to many in our community. But to reiterate, these individuals are struggling, many from mental illnesses, and are continually chastised for not having the “normal” coping mechanisms to control their lives. This safe injection site would allow for accessible, sanitary and safe means of using illicit substances, as well as provide a friendly environment free of judgment for staff members to actively engage with drug users. Having staff onsite trained in harm reduction techniques would allow addicts access to learn new strategies, be connected to other treatment services, and provide a glimpse of hope for them to realize their potential to overcome their addiction.

You may still feel this idea of allowing people to use illegal drugs in an organized legal facility is ludicrous. Won’t this encourage drug use?

Statistics have shown in Vancouver that there has not been a substantial increase in drug use because of the opening of the legal injection site. The truth of the matter is that a safe consumption site is a radical idea. It does contradict the majority of our community’s thoughts toward drug addicts. But this facility would approach the issue of drug use in a humane manner treating them as people, not outcasts of society. By providing a safe injection site, Chatham-Kent can confront the opioid crisis before it becomes an epidemic in our own backyard.

[“Source-chathamdailynews”]

Yoga: A Plus Size Woman’s Answer to Body Shaming, Trolls

Image result for Yoga: A Plus Size Woman's Answer to Body Shaming, TrollsMumbai: A plus-sized Indian woman is challenging body stereotypes and defying internet trolls with a series of yoga videos that are proving a hit on social media.

Thirty-four-year-old Dolly Singh has gained something of a fan following online for promoting body positivity by showing that size is no barrier to mastering complex yoga moves.

To say ‘You can’t do this because you have so much weight,’ I don’t believe that,” Singh tells AFP after completing her morning stretch in a Mumbai park.

Four years ago a doctor advised her to lose weight following an ankle sprain. Singh, who is 4 feet 11 inches (150 cm), weighed almost 90 kilograms (198 pounds) at the time.

She got a trainer and embraced the “whole frenzy of losing weight” but grew bored of running so she signed up for something she’d never done before — yoga.

“The first class I was thinking ‘Can I really do this because I have a big body?’ After two or three class I realised people were looking at me and thinking ‘Oh my god she can do this’. My body had a certain kind of stamina, of flexibility.”

Singh, who works for a TV channel in India’s financial capital, soon realised there were limitations to group classes and sought the instruction she needed from videos online.

“We all have different bodies and if my teacher doesn’t have a belly, how will they know what the problems are of having a big belly,” she explains, laughing.

“I’m a big busted person and if the teacher isn’t how are they going to understand that when I’m doing a Halasana (plough pose) I’m almost choking to death!”

Singh started filming herself to monitor her progress and then began posting clips of her yoga poses on Instagram.

DOLLY---875

‘Online trolls’

Soon she was inundated with messages, mainly from foreigners at first but then from Indian women saying that Singh was an inspiration to them.

“I’ve been overwhelmed by some people saying they would feel alienated in a room full of perfect yoga bodies, how they would feel that everyone is watching them.

“There’s an idea of not showing your body if you’re big bodied. You’re supposed to hide everything because its not appealing or it’s not something people like to see but that’s just something that’s been sold to us,” she insists.

The response hasn’t all been positive however. Singh says she has been the victim of body shaming online.

“Indian men have not been encouraging at all. There are a lot of people who write very nasty comments. They would say something like ‘You’re just a fat blob, you look just like an elephant or bear, or you’re unfit or it’s because you’re eating so much food.

“I completely ignore these things. You can’t fight internet trolls. I don’t know these people so why should it bother me?”

Singh, who currently weighs 73 kg, says she will continue trying to sell “a more positive body image” and “challenge notions of fitness and beauty”.

“I’m not aiming to have this thin figure but I am aiming to have a beautiful flow and make my body strong through yoga,” she says, smiling.

[“Source-news18”]

New Study Shows This Common OTC Pain Reliever Has a Really Scary Side Effect

Ibuprofen, a common over-the-counter pain reliever, has a troubling side-effect that’s often overlooked, but new findings have proved it’s more important to know about this now than ever before. Recent evidence found that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), like ibuprofen, can increase your chances of having a heart attack in as little as one week of continuous use.

In a recent study published in the British Medical Journal, data from almost 450,000 people, 61,460 of whom had suffered a heart attack, was analyzed looking for the effect over time of taking three common anti-inflammatory painkillers: ibuprofen, diclofenac and naproxen. The data revealed that compared with people who didn’t take the painkillers, those who did ingest them had a 20 percent to 50 percent increased risk of having a heart attack.

Additionally, the risk was found to be higher for people who ingested 1,200 mg a day of ibuprofen (about six tablets of Advil) and 750 mg a day for naproxen (about three and a half Aleves), Yahoo! reports. The study reported that it only took a week for a higher risk of heart attack to set in on a person, with the highest risk occurring at about a month of usage. After a month, researchers found that the risk didn’t increase further but rather stayed the same.

Typically, NSAIDs are safe when used correctly for mild pain relief, however, many people have begun relying on NSAIDs for prolonged periods of time at a higher dosage to treat their pain, which is why the risk of heart attack associated with the use of NSAIDs has begun to rise.

While this study certainly revealed a scary truth about the drug, it’s important to note that taking an NSAID for minor pain relief at the lowest effective dose and a minimal length of time isn’t likely to cause aheart attack. It’s the usage level over a longer time period at higher dosage that can be dangerous, so it’s best to limit your use as much as possible to avoid any unwanted negative side effects.

 

 

 

[“source-newbeauty”]

EXERCISE CAN BE PUNISHING – BUT HERE’S HOW TO STOP THINKING OF IT AS A PUNISHMENT

Image result for EXERCISE CAN BE PUNISHING – BUT HERE’S HOW TO STOP THINKING OF IT AS A PUNISHMENTThe fitness industry is said to be worth £4.4bn in the UK alone. But, despite medical research telling us that exercise will help us live longer, the majority of people do not engage with health and fitness. Could it be that exercise is still considered a punishment – as it was in Victorian prisons?

Or do we just need to increase the fun and social aspect to exercise to get more of us working up a sweat?

Medical research suggests exercise is good for our health and will help us all live longer. But a report by the British Heart Foundation says that 20 million people living in the UK are physically inactive.

To be considered active, the Department of Health recommends adults should accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity activity per week. So it begs the question: why do close to a third of the country’s population struggle to meet this recommended amount of exercise, when doing so could prolong their life?

A reason why inactive people may not engage in enough exercise is because it is not perceived to be a fulfilling or satisfying leisure pursuit. Other competing pastimes of a more sedentary nature, such as watching TV, reading and gaming, are seen by some as being more enjoyable.

Exercise as punishment

The treadmill was devised as a form of punishment for convicted criminals in the Victorian era. At this time, prisoners had to undertake long hours of hard labour by walking on treadmills to grind flour. This form of punishment was abolished in the late 19th century for being too cruel.

Exercise also has a long history of being used as a form of correctional behaviour in schools. Indeed in 2014 the then-Education Secretary, Nicky Morgan, proposed to ban exercise being used in schools as a form of punishment for fear that it would put children off being active.

Given that exercise has a lengthy historical association with the use of discipline for the purpose of punishment and obedience, can 21st century society ever be truly accepting of exercise as a leisure pursuit that can have personal fulfilment?

At present, the high volume of inactivity levels in the UK suggests a large amount of people are not motivated to take exercise. Getting people to be more active, therefore, would require a shift in people exercising because they want to rather than having to.

Making it social

My research explores the role of social psychology for the development of interventions that make physical activity a fulfilling pursuit for long-term condition sufferers. This is because social psychological science has consistently demonstrated that people are motivated to seek social connections in order to fulfil their psychological needs as human beings. For example, “the belongingness hypothesis” states that people have a basic need to feel closely connected to others.

So it is important people have positive social exercise experiences that enrich their quality of life and, in doing so, make the pursuit of exercise a more satisfying and worthwhile activity. This can be achieved by creating exercise environments that provide individuals with a shared sense of social connectedness, creating opportunities for people to form friendships, meaningful attachments and mutually supportive relationships.

For example, the EuroFit programme takes a unique approach for improving men’s health and fitness by allowing fans to train in the environment of a professional football club they support. City Ride events are another example, where families and friends of all ages and abilities can enjoy cycling together through the streets of a vibrant traffic-free environment. Similarly, walking sports offer a social atmosphere of fun, laughter and camaraderie for those who may have difficulty participating in high impact activities.

Connecting people in dynamic and socially rewarding exercise environments has the potential to offset the drudgery often associated with exercise and make it a leisure pursuit worth doing.

[“Source-independent”]

How does a high-fat diet raise colorectal cancer risk?

Image result for How does a high-fat diet raise colorectal cancer risk?A new study suggests a molecular explanation for the link between a high-fat diet and colorectal cancer.
While the evidence of a link between an unhealthful diet and colorectal cancer is robust, the underlying mechanisms for this association have been unclear. A new study, however, may have uncovered an explanation.

Researchers from the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio have identified a cellular signaling pathway, called JAK2-STAT3, that drives the growth of cancer stem cells in the colon in response to a high-fat diet.

What is more, the researchers found that blocking the JAK2-STAT3 pathway in mice fed a high-fat diet halted the growth of these stem cells, a finding that might fuel the development of new drugs to treat colorectal cancer.

Study co-author Dr. Matthew Kalady, co-director of the Comprehensive Colorectal Cancer Program at the Cleveland Clinic, and colleagues recently reported their findings in the journal Stem Cell Reports.

After skin cancer, colorectal cancer – a cancer that begins in the colon or rectum – is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States.

The American Cancer Society estimate that there will be 95,520 new cases of colon cancerdiagnosed in the U.S. this year, as well as 39,910 new cases of rectal cancer.

In recent years, a wealth of studies have suggested that a high-fat diet is a risk factor for colorectal cancer. However, the precise mechanisms behind this association have been ambiguous.

With the hope of shedding light on such mechanisms, Dr. Kalady and colleagues investigated how a high-fat diet influences JAK2-STAT3, a cellular signaling pathway known to promote tumorgrowth.

Findings may fuel new treatments

To reach their findings, the researchers used microrarray analysis to assess primary and metastasized tumors in mouse models of colorectal cancer.

When the mice were fed a high-fat diet, the growth of cancer stem cells in the colon increased. Studies have indicated that cancer stem cells are a key driver in the growth and metastasis of tumors.

On further investigation, the team found that blocking the JAK2-STAT3 cellular signaling pathway in the rodents reversed the increase in cancer stem cell growth triggered by a high-fat diet.

When analyzing the effects of a high-fat diet in colorectal cancer mouse models that were obesity-resistant, the researchers were able to replicate their findings.

Dr. Kalady says that this study is the first to demonstrate how a specific molecular pathway might mediate the link between a high-fat diet and colorectal cancer, a discovery that could yield new treatments for the disease.

We can now build upon this knowledge to develop new treatments aimed at blocking this pathway and reducing the negative impact of a high-fat diet on colon cancer risk.”

Dr. Matthew Kalady

“These findings also provide a new way in which cancer stem cells are regulated and provide insight into how environmental influences, such as diet, can alter cancer stem cell populations in advanced cancers,” adds study co-author Justin D. Lathia, Ph.D., of the Lerner Research Institute at Cleveland Clinic.

[“Source-medicalnewstoday”]

The Core Exercise Trainers Love (No, It’s Not A Plank)

We’re not here to play games: The truth is, there’s no magical workout move that does it all. However, there are certain exercises that set you up to move better and lift things more easily. Many of these involve strengthening your core, because a strong midsection is essential for every workout, sport, and fitness activity — not to mention daily life. And that’s where the core reach (also known as the dead-bug exercise) comes in.
This move — think of it as a flipped-over version of a moving plank — is functional, safe, and strengthens the same muscles you use for everything from doing squats to hauling groceries. It’s also especially useful for runners because it teaches trunk stability and control while you’re moving your arms and legs in opposition. This mirrors what you do when you’re walking and running, explains Ashleigh Kast, trainer at Drive Clubs in New York City and founder of Sophisticated Strength. This stability helps establish a more efficient stride pattern that controls breathing and prevents lower back pain often caused by poor running form.
You can include the core reach as part of your warm-up before a gym workout or run, or try it as a quick exercise first thing in the morning. Plus, it’s simple to increase or decrease the intensity level depending on where you are in your fitness journey. Just lace up a pair of supportive and cushiony adidas UltraBOOST X sneakers and follow along with brand ambassador Jera Foster-Fell. Time to kick-start your workout.
The Core Reach
Start lying on your back with arms extended straight in the air with wrists over shoulders. Bend your knees to a tabletop position, making 90-degree angles with your shins parallel to the floor. While pushing your low back against the ground, extend your right arm overhead and your left leg outward until they hover a few inches off the floor, but not so low that your back arches. Immediately return to the starting position, and repeat on the opposite side. Do 10 reps on each side, alternating arms and legs each rep.
“The most common mistake I see people make is beginning with the back arched,” Kast says. Fix this by flattening your back on the floor before you start moving, and be conscious to maintain that position throughout the entire exercise.
“This move is an amazing opportunity to begin linking your breath to your movement, which is key for mastering any exercise or sport,” says Kast. Inhale as you lower your arm and leg and exhale as you pull them back in.
Just Getting Started? Try This Beginner-Friendly Variation
Keep your arms extended by your sides on the ground or directly overhead. Bring your legs into that same tabletop position and — keeping your knees bent at 90 degrees — lower your right heel to tap the ground. Return your leg to the starting position, and repeat with your left leg. By shortening the length of your legs, you reduce the load on your core, thus requiring less stability, and you’re using your arms to help you balance. Do 10 reps on each side, alternating legs each rep.
PHOTOGRAPHED BY MAGDALENA KMIECIK
For More Of A Challenge, Add Some Weight
While holding a five- to 10-pound medicine ball (a kettlebell or single dumbbell does the job, too), extend your arms directly above your head and perpendicular to the floor. Keep your arms in place while extending one leg at a time. The goal here is to create maximum tension in the body, so imagine you’re trying to crush the ball between your hands. This tension helps stabilize your core and adds work for your upper-body muscles. Do 10 reps on each side, alternating legs each rep.
[“Source-refinery29.”]

I Tried A Diet And Fitness Plan Based On My DNA And Couldn’t Believe The Results

 My name is Daysha, and I have always struggled with my weight.

Growing up, my weight fluctuated a lot. At one point in my life, I developed disordered eating habits. After recovering and practicing a lot of self-love, I found the problem then became that I never saw the same results that I did when I was starving myself.

It’s not that I don’t enjoy working out and eating healthy, because I do.

I love cooking healthy meals and I dance four to five times per week. I have always been frustrated with why it's so hard for me to lose weight. I tried all sorts of methods to lose weight and get fit, including a raw vegan diet, Weight Watchers, seeing a dietitian, doing a soup cleanse, P90X, and even getting a personal trainer. Nothing seemed to work for me.

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I love cooking healthy meals and I dance four to five times per week. I have always been frustrated with why it’s so hard for me to lose weight. I tried all sorts of methods to lose weight and get fit, including a raw vegan diet, Weight Watchers, seeing a dietitian, doing a soup cleanse, P90X, and even getting a personal trainer. Nothing seemed to work for me.

I started to believe that maybe it’s just my genetics.

Not ever seeing results discouraged me so much to the point that I wanted to just give up. It turned into a continuous cycle of embarking on a new diet or fitness plan, not seeing any real change after a few months, and then just giving up again.

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Not ever seeing results discouraged me so much to the point that I wanted to just give up. It turned into a continuous cycle of embarking on a new diet or fitness plan, not seeing any real change after a few months, and then just giving up again.

Then I found out about this thing called FitnessGenes and took a DNA test.

FitnessGenes is a genetic testing company that develops personalized fitness and nutrition plans based on an individual's DNA. I met with Dr. Dan Reardon, the CEO/cofounder, and took a DNA test. The results took one month to process. When I finally got them back, I was shocked.

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FitnessGenes is a genetic testing company that develops personalized fitness and nutrition plans based on an individual’s DNA. I met with Dr. Dan Reardon, the CEO/cofounder, and took a DNA test. The results took one month to process. When I finally got them back, I was shocked.

I sat down with Dr. Dan to learn more about my genetics and how my body works. Here’s what I learned:

1. My suspicion was correct. Genetically, I do have a slower metabolism. Dr. Dan described this in scientific terms as an "efficient metabolism," meaning that I store energy more than someone with a fast or "inefficient metabolism." 2. I also have a gene variation for the FTO gene that is linked to a hormone called ghrelin, which controls hunger. My gene variation implies that I am someone who becomes hungry very easily, therefore creating a higher risk of overeating. Dan said that eating small, frequent meals throughout the day to control hunger would be important. 3. I also have a gene variation in the APOA2 gene, indicating that I am sensitive to saturated fats, meaning that it sticks to me more easily! I asked Dr. Dan what foods have saturated fats and he said things like animal products, butter, dairy products, palm oil, and coconut oil. Coconut oil?! I ate so much coconut oil because of how often it's promoted as a healthy oil. No wonder I was having trouble.4. I am someone who would benefit from working out later in the day because my CLOCK gene variations imply that I am a night owl. This made perfect sense because I am definitely not a morning person.5. I am someone who responds well to "high-volume training," meaning high sets and reps of weight training. I always thought that lots of cardio would be the key to losing weight. It turns out that it was going to take a lot of strength training. Dan said that the more muscle I built, the more fat I would burn. 6. I am someone who does not switch from burning carbohydrates to burning fat easily. This would mean that I would need to be eating the right balance of macronutrients: carbs, protein and fat.7. Dan also said that I have a gene variation that indicates I metabolize caffeine slowly. This means that I would benefit by having a cup of green tea about 30 minutes prior to a workout for optimal energy.

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1. My suspicion was correct. Genetically, I do have a slower metabolism. Dr. Dan described this in scientific terms as an “efficient metabolism,” meaning that I store energy more than someone with a fast or “inefficient metabolism.”

2. I also have a gene variation for the FTO gene that is linked to a hormone called ghrelin, which controls hunger. My gene variation implies that I am someone who becomes hungry very easily, therefore creating a higher risk of overeating. Dan said that eating small, frequent meals throughout the day to control hunger would be important.

3. I also have a gene variation in the APOA2 gene, indicating that I am sensitive to saturated fats, meaning that it sticks to me more easily! I asked Dr. Dan what foods have saturated fats and he said things like animal products, butter, dairy products, palm oil, and coconut oil. Coconut oil?! I ate so much coconut oil because of how often it’s promoted as a healthy oil. No wonder I was having trouble.

4. I am someone who would benefit from working out later in the day because my CLOCK gene variations imply that I am a night owl. This made perfect sense because I am definitely not a morning person.

5. I am someone who responds well to “high-volume training,” meaning high sets and reps of weight training. I always thought that lots of cardio would be the key to losing weight. It turns out that it was going to take a lot of strength training. Dan said that the more muscle I built, the more fat I would burn.

6. I am someone who does not switch from burning carbohydrates to burning fat easily. This would mean that I would need to be eating the right balance of macronutrients: carbs, protein and fat.

7. Dan also said that I have a gene variation that indicates I metabolize caffeine slowly. This means that I would benefit by having a cup of green tea about 30 minutes prior to a workout for optimal energy.

Instead of counting calories, I tracked my macronutrients.

Dan said it would be important to have 1,700–1,900 calories maximum per day, since I am someone with a slow metabolism. However, instead of counting calories, which had put me in a negative headspace in the past, I tracked my macronutrients every day using this whiteboard. Macronutrient breakdown Carbohydrates: 40% Protein: 30% Fat: 30% (less than 8% coming from saturated fats, and the main source coming from monounsaturated fats. This would include foods such as almonds, olive oil, avocado, sesame oil, and canola oil.)

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Dan said it would be important to have 1,700–1,900 calories maximum per day, since I am someone with a slow metabolism. However, instead of counting calories, which had put me in a negative headspace in the past, I tracked my macronutrients every day using this whiteboard.

Macronutrient breakdown

Carbohydrates: 40%

Protein: 30%

Fat: 30% (less than 8% coming from saturated fats, and the main source coming from monounsaturated fats. This would include foods such as almonds, olive oil, avocado, sesame oil, and canola oil.)

I learned how to create meals that were delicious and healthy for my body.

The 30-day plan was easy to follow, but it did take a lot of hard work.

I worked out with Dan three to four times per week doing strength training and high-intensity interval training (HIIT). I had two active recovery days and also took a brisk walk every morning. Yes, there were times when I wanted to quit, but I felt stronger and stronger as the time went by. It motivated me even more to continue.

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I worked out with Dan three to four times per week doing strength training and high-intensity interval training (HIIT). I had two active recovery days and also took a brisk walk every morning. Yes, there were times when I wanted to quit, but I felt stronger and stronger as the time went by. It motivated me even more to continue.

I couldn’t have done it without a strong support system.

I was lucky enough to have friends who were invested in me and seeing me succeed. They were even willing to work out with me!

After 30 days, I could not believe the results!

I didn't weigh myself the entire 30 days, because I didn't want to be discouraged by the numbers. Instead, I focused on how I was feeling. I had more energy than I have ever had before! In the end, it really wasn't about the numbers for me. I just wanted to be the healthiest, happiest version of myself.

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I didn’t weigh myself the entire 30 days, because I didn’t want to be discouraged by the numbers. Instead, I focused on how I was feeling. I had more energy than I have ever had before! In the end, it really wasn’t about the numbers for me. I just wanted to be the healthiest, happiest version of myself.

Although I lost weight and body fat, it was never about the numbers for me. I came out of this experience a different person on the inside, and that is what matters to me the most.

This experience allowed me to trust my body more than I ever have. I realized that I was always caught in this mindset that I was somehow "broken," and that nothing would ever work for me. In reality, I just needed to learn more about my body and how I function as an individual. We live in a culture where everyone is trying to tell you what's healthy, and this gave me the peace of mind to know what's actually healthy for my own body. This is only the beginning for me!

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This experience allowed me to trust my body more than I ever have. I realized that I was always caught in this mindset that I was somehow “broken,” and that nothing would ever work for me. In reality, I just needed to learn more about my body and how I function as an individual. We live in a culture where everyone is trying to tell you what’s healthy, and this gave me the peace of mind to know what’s actually healthy for my own body. This is only the beginning for me!

FitnessGenes is offering a 20% discount for BuzzFeed users using code BUZZFEED at checkout. Follow this link.

Special thanks to Granite Gym and Sanctuary Fitness LA for use of their facilities.

[“Source-buzzfeed”]

I Got A $1,200 Virtual Reality Facial From John Mayer’s Favorite Skin Line

“I’m getting a $1,200 virtual reality facial that uses John Mayer’s favorite European skin-care products tomorrow — and it’s in an oxygen bubble,” I told my boyfriend last week.
Most men outside of the beauty industry would have thought this was odd conversation, but after seven months of dating, I have my boyfriend on a dedicated skin routine that’s kept his complexion clear and bright — and he’s into it. Meanwhile, he’s exposed me to all that virtual reality, or VR, has to offer, including games, experiences, and a working knowledge of how the technology will inevitably change the future of media — and I’m into it.
So when I heard about a treatment that brings these two seemingly opposite experiences together, I had to try it out.
You may know Natura Bissé as the Spanish brand front and center in John Mayer’s slightly-satirical stab at beauty vlogging last year. In the viral Snapchat videos, he shared his most effective hacks for better skin, including Mayer-isms like CNZs, or “crucial necessity zones” that should be always covered with face cream (so, basically just everywhere) and D.A.T., or “direct application technique,” which involves squirting face cream directly onto skin to limit product waste on fingers. (Spoiler: This is not actually effective.)
Jokes aside, the reason these videos went viral is not because of his application techniques, but because his entire routine rang in at a whopping $1,457. But hold onto your debit cards, because this year, the brand’s implementing a treatment that’s just as novel — and nearly as expensive.
Called The Mindful Touch Experience, it is, according to the brand, “the most innovative and trailblazing venture within the spa sector, in which the results of Natura Bissé’s cosmetics are combined with the most advanced technology.” So how does it work? “Through virtual reality, mindfulness and the therapist’s expertise – the touch – we invite the client to reconnect with the here and now, to relax their body, to awaken their senses and to experience the pleasure of beauty in a more intense way,” the official statement reads. Still confused? I was, too.
Let’s get this out of the way first: At $1,200 for one hour, the facial is far from affordable. However, this has less to do with the bubble itself or the VR technology and more to do with the fact that the brand’s products are just really pricey. Even though I was getting it at a comped press appointment, I still felt a little guilty.
The brand is famous for its bubbles and there are only a few, so you have to catch one while it’s on tour. (Yes, the bubble has more expensive tickets and fewer tour dates than Bieber.) It’s large enough for a bed, a table, and your aesthetician, and it’s filled with 99% pure oxygen, which it supposed to help with the absorption of products. Once you enter said bubble, you remove your robe and lie down, then affix the VR headset.
For eight minutes, you’re walked through a virtual reality experience — you travel through the ocean, wander around a brain, and are led on what is essentially a guided meditation to relax and let go of stress. Meanwhile, your aesthetician is floating essential oils under your nose and massaging your head and limbs to sync with what you’re seeing. It was pretty amazing.
But then, after eight minutes, the headset comes off and the facial begins. As far as facials go, this one was pretty standard: cleanse, tone, mask, peel (but no extractions, unfortunately). As a wonderful added bonus, though, the guided meditation continued, so I was reminded throughout the experience to clear my mind and stay present.
“I’m getting a $1,200 virtual reality facial that uses John Mayer’s favorite European skin-care products tomorrow — and it’s in an oxygen bubble,” I told my boyfriend last week.
Most men outside of the beauty industry would have thought this was odd conversation, but after seven months of dating, I have my boyfriend on a dedicated skin routine that’s kept his complexion clear and bright — and he’s into it. Meanwhile, he’s exposed me to all that virtual reality, or VR, has to offer, including games, experiences, and a working knowledge of how the technology will inevitably change the future of media — and I’m into it.
So when I heard about a treatment that brings these two seemingly opposite experiences together, I had to try it out.
You may know Natura Bissé as the Spanish brand front and center in John Mayer’s slightly-satirical stab at beauty vlogging last year. In the viral Snapchat videos, he shared his most effective hacks for better skin, including Mayer-isms like CNZs, or “crucial necessity zones” that should be always covered with face cream (so, basically just everywhere) and D.A.T., or “direct application technique,” which involves squirting face cream directly onto skin to limit product waste on fingers. (Spoiler: This is not actually effective.)
Jokes aside, the reason these videos went viral is not because of his application techniques, but because his entire routine rang in at a whopping $1,457. But hold onto your debit cards, because this year, the brand’s implementing a treatment that’s just as novel — and nearly as expensive.
Called The Mindful Touch Experience, it is, according to the brand, “the most innovative and trailblazing venture within the spa sector, in which the results of Natura Bissé’s cosmetics are combined with the most advanced technology.” So how does it work? “Through virtual reality, mindfulness and the therapist’s expertise – the touch – we invite the client to reconnect with the here and now, to relax their body, to awaken their senses and to experience the pleasure of beauty in a more intense way,” the official statement reads. Still confused? I was, too.
My Time In The Bubble
Let’s get this out of the way first: At $1,200 for one hour, the facial is far from affordable. However, this has less to do with the bubble itself or the VR technology and more to do with the fact that the brand’s products are just really pricey. Even though I was getting it at a comped press appointment, I still felt a little guilty.
The brand is famous for its bubbles and there are only a few, so you have to catch one while it’s on tour. (Yes, the bubble has more expensive tickets and fewer tour dates than Bieber.) It’s large enough for a bed, a table, and your aesthetician, and it’s filled with 99% pure oxygen, which it supposed to help with the absorption of products. Once you enter said bubble, you remove your robe and lie down, then affix the VR headset.
For eight minutes, you’re walked through a virtual reality experience — you travel through the ocean, wander around a brain, and are led on what is essentially a guided meditation to relax and let go of stress. Meanwhile, your aesthetician is floating essential oils under your nose and massaging your head and limbs to sync with what you’re seeing. It was pretty amazing.
But then, after eight minutes, the headset comes off and the facial begins. As far as facials go, this one was pretty standard: cleanse, tone, mask, peel (but no extractions, unfortunately). As a wonderful added bonus, though, the guided meditation continued, so I was reminded throughout the experience to clear my mind and stay present.
The Results
The facial was great — my skin looked and felt radiant, soft, and hydrated for days (for $1,200 it had better, right?), but it wasn’t unlike anything I’ve ever tried. What excited me most was seeing a beauty brand find a way to use VR to relax the client and add another layer to a classic spa experience.
The headset (a Samsung) and the content weren’t the best quality I’ve seen, but in the context of where I was (nude, in an oxygen bubble, being fawned over in the middle of a weekday afternoon), it was pretty great.
After all, from Coachella installations to the future of surfing Facebook or watching YouTube, VR is on the horizon — and it’s about time the beauty world dove in. Once they figure out how to do a facial with a headset on the entire time? Then things will get real sci-fi.
Natura Bissé just upped the game, so I guess it’s your move, Mayer.
[“Source-refinery29.”]