10 Reasons Your Hair Thins

Thinning hair doesn’t happen just because. There are a whole host of factors that can cause your hair to look sparse. Here’s what’s going on.

Your Genes

Englewood Cliffs, NJ, dermatologist Jeffrey Rapaport, MD, says that your genes are probably the most common cause for thinning hair. “As women get older, it’s normal for them to start to see thinning. When genetics play a role, we sometimes see the thinning much earlier on or it’s more intensified.”

Your Hormones

Anything that alters your hormone levels—think birth control, menopause or pregnancy—can be responsible for hair that’s thinner than normal. Plano, TX, plastic surgeon Joseph Yaker, MD, says thinning hair is especially common in menopausal women because estrogen levels diminish. “The hormone estrogen is essential for protecting the hair.” Hormone-related disorders like polycystic ovary syndrome can impact the thickness of hair, too.

Having a Baby

During pregnancy, hair is thick, shiny andvoluminous. But post-pregnancy, it’s not uncommon for the hair to begin temporarily thinning out (and even breaking) due to a shift in hormones. About three months after delivery, hormones send the hair from an active, growing state into a resting one. For the most part, once your hormone levels even out, your hair should return back to normal.

Damaged Stem Cells in Hair Follicles

A rather new discovery in the world of thinning, the more damage (predominantly caused by aging) that occurs to the stem cells that live in the hair follicles, the more likely it is for those stem cells to turn into skin. Years of this transfer causes the follicles to shrink in size to the point that there is more skin than hair in the area, leading to patches of thinning hair or even bald spots.

Excessive Amounts of Vitamin A

One of the more under-the-radar causes of thinning hair is taking too many supplements with vitamin A, which sends the hair growth cycleinto a tailspin. However, once you stop taking high levels of the vitamin, your body will revert back to baseline and your hair should continue to grow regularly.

A Lack of Protein

Going vegetarian or vegan may do wonders for your body, but chances are it won’t do much for your hair. While not everyone who forgoes animal-based sources of protein experiences thinning hair, it’s not uncommon to see signs of thinning and hair loss because protein is often limited. To reverse the effects, take a protein and iron supplement or start to add reliable protein sources, like beans, quinoaand tempeh, into your diet.

Stress

Any type of emotional or physical stress can send your hair into a temporary state of disarray and here’s why. When your body is stressed, an uneven number of hairs transfer into the resting phase all at once. Then, when those hairs fall out, more than normal amounts are shed.

Medical Conditions and Autoimmune Disorders

When the immune system has to work overtime to keep symptoms of certain diseases at bay, the body may not be able to sort out what’s going on and mistake hair as something foreign and harmful to the body. Palo Alto, CA, facial plastic surgeon Jill Hessler, MD, says that low thyroid levels can lead to hair loss. Hair thinning and hair loss caused by autoimmune disorders, also known as alopecia areata, is one of the harder types of thinning to treat.

Sudden Weight Loss

Dropping a serious amount of weight extremely fast (think 25 pounds in one month) can cause trauma to your hair, leaving it thin and weak. It’s not the weight loss itself that causes it, but rather the lack of vitamins, nutrients and healthy fats that you may be depriving yourself of that change the texture of your hair.

Overstyling and Abusing Your Hair

Everything in moderation is the best approach to take when it comes to your hair. “Some hair types can’t tolerate the same amount of heat styling as others, but you need to know what your hair can withstand,” says Bumble and bumble stylist and educator, Carrie Hill. “Use medium heat instead of high heat and give your hot tools a break by using them every other day instead of every day.”

 

 

[“source-newbeauty”]

Your Purse May Be The Reason Your Hair Is Thinning

If you saw our stash of hair masks and heat serums, you’d know how protective we are over our hair’s health. But when a recent article surfaced warning about the potential damage our purses—yes, you read that right—could be doing to our locks, time about stopped. Here’s the breakdown.

When Lisa DeSantis sat down in her salon chair and listened to her first-time hairstylist, Francis Catanese, a stylist at Art and Autonomy in New York City, immediately ask her if she wore her purse on the left side, she thought her lopsided posture was a surefire giveaway. But when Catanese replied with, “I can tell because your hair is thinner on that side,” adding that he’s seen it worse, but that there was definitely a difference present, DeSantis was in for a crash course (and so were we).

Catanese went on to explain that the strap of your handbag can often pull at your hairs, weaken the follicles and cause breakage you didn’t even know about. Even worse, it can be plucking the strands right out. But take this for what it’s worth: After reaching out to various doctors for their input, none had heard of the case affecting the health of our hair.

Fortunately, there’s a simple solution to help save your strands either way. First off, be aware of where your hair sits each time you throw a bag on your shoulder—either move them to the side or clip them up to be sure—because you never know if any hair is lagging behind that can get damaged, or even worse plucked out, because of your handbag. The same goes for backpacks. If you’re not careful, you could potentially thin your hair out on both sides, an even bigger tragedy.

 

 

[“source-newbeauty”]

Don’t blame Dubai for your hair loss: Celeb surgeon

Hair transplant surgeon Dr. Sajjad Khan busts some myths on hair loss

How many times have you heard your friends and colleagues blaming Dubai for their increased hair loss? They attribute it to the water in the city.

We now have the misconception cleared, thanks to Dr. Sajjad Khan, the celebrity hair transplant surgeon in Dubai to attend his high-profile clients. To his credit, he has the biggest actors in Bollywood, royalty and athletes among his clientele. His website mentions Gulshan Grover, Sanjay Kapoor, singer Abhijeet Bhattacharya and few more but it is the names he shared in confidence during our interview that left us baffled.

Being associated with Dubai for the past two decades, he knows what the reasons for hair loss – and water is not one of them. “I laugh when some of my clients insist on washing their hair with mineral water. It is not required at all. If you have so much money, give it to charity. If the water in Dubai is harsh, it will only make your hair brittle but that could be mended by using a better shampoo and conditioner,” said Dr. Khan.

And that’s not the only myth he busted during the chat he had with City Times.

Dr. Khan goes on to share that a majority of his clients are men who suffer from genetic hair loss. “Men are more prone to balding because of their genetics, but it can be corrected with a good diet and regular exercise. The problem, however, is that if we don’t address the hair loss issue, and don’t seek timely medical help, it may be too late to reverse the damage.”

While hair transplant can be an effective one-time solution, in many cases, regenerative medicine can fix your hair woes. “Great hair starts with a healthy scalp and regenerative treatments can harness the power of your own body’s stem cells to strengthen hair and reduce loss,” Dr. Khan explained.

Hair loss in women

It is not only men, genetics is also responsible for hair loss among women – at least in 50 per cent of the cases.The other 50 per cent is metabolic as women’s bodies go through many changes due to pregnancy or menopause.Special attention should be given to pregnant women’s diets because sometimes, the hair they shed never comes back, Dr. Khan cautioned.

Menopause is a very critical time as 90 per cent of the estrogen levels drop due to the reduction in testosterone levels, he said. It is the imbalance in hormone levels that leads to hair loss.”In these cases, replacement therapy is very helpful as estrogen levels can be restored. If replacement therapy is not an option, regenerative medicine can regenerate hair through your own body stems.”The other common causes of hair loss among women include low hemoglobin levels and thyroid hormone levels. Drastic weight loss (3-4 kg a month) can also lead to hair fall or thinning hair, he said.

Summer care for you hair

During summer, your hair becomes dry due to the heat. The average moisture in hair should be around 8 to 10 per cent and losing it, makes your hair brittle. “In case of extreme temperatures, you could use thermal active heat protectant on your hair. It coats the hair and you don’t risk losing the moisture,” Dr Khan advised. He further stated that ultra-violet rays affect the hair cuticles and weaken them. “You could also mix SPF 30+, oil free sun-screen into your conditioner and apply it to your hair to provide extra protection.”

DO NOT BELIEVE IN THESE HAIR MYTHS

Don’t use conditioner on scalp

The focus, these days, is to make the scalp better, and healthier. If your scalp is not treated right, your hair will never be healthy. Today’s conditioners are conducive for the scalp too and you have to moisturise your scalp.

Opt for sulfate-free shampoos

The notion of using shampoos without sulfate is wrong. Sulphate-free shampoos are not a must, but you must look for milder sulfates.

Go organic

Not all organic hair products are good for your hair. Some sophisticated ingredients are needed for healthy hair and scalp. Organic ingredients cannot provide them. It is necessary to consult a hair expert and opt for the best shampoo by renowned pharma brands.

Scissors matter

Professional hair stylists use top-quality scissors that range (Some costing $200 to $500). The stylist’s scissors must be well-maintained as dull scissors damage hair cuticles and lead to split ends.

Regularly oiling your hair

Hair structure is made up of protein and oils are made of fat. Secondly, your hair needs moisture and oil doesn’t provide any. So, while oiling might help lay flat the cuticle, it is not essential. A good conditioner will do better!

[“Source-khaleejtimes”]

‘My relationship break-up triggered my hair loss’

Image result for ‘My relationship break-up triggered my hair loss’“When I went to university, I’d not long broken up with a boyfriend of three-and-a-half years. Then, when I met James* in the first few weeks of Freshers’, I fell for him quickly. We soon started a relationship and didn’t look back.

It was so nice to have someone there with me throughout my university experience; to share it all together. We cared about each other and about one another’s work, so when James suggested we should have a break after a year and a half together, I was gutted. He said he wasn’t sure how he was feeling anymore and that he wanted two weeks apart to work it out. When the break only lasted a week, I was relieved – he decided he’d made a big mistake and that he still wanted to be with me. In hindsight, though, that was obviously the start of him becoming much less invested in the relationship than I was.

One day, after having been back together for a while, I looked at him and said something along the lines of, “I think you might be the one.” Instead of saying it back, he just froze. When a few tense moments had passed and he said, “I’m not sure”, I realised the relationship was over. It was never going to go back to how it had been before.

‘My relationship break-up triggered my hair loss’

James didn’t actually break up with me until some weeks later, when he’d left uni to go home for the summer. We spent an excruciatingly long three-hour phone conversation dodging the issue until I finally told him: “If you need to say something, just say it”. We were finished, and I was heartbroken.

For me, it was like the whole bubble of university had burst along with everything in it. I crashed; it completely knocked me. I’d fallen for James so fast and then all of a sudden I didn’t have him anymore. I felt so lost.

Another heartbreak

Just weeks after James and I broke up, I received a phone call from one of my university friends. A course-mate of ours, Fran*, had gone to Ireland with some other friends from university for the summer, and had been travelling in a car down a notoriously dangerous road when they had a head-on collision with another vehicle. Fran had died, and I didn’t know how to feel. I remember taking in the information but then instantly focusing on calming down my friend, who was in floods of tears by this point. Fran and I hadn’t been particularly close, but just before the summer break we’d worked on a dance group piece together for one of our modules, so we’d spent a lot of condensed time together. It was a horrible feeling to think that she wasn’t in the world anymore.

September came around, and after everything that had happened before and during the summer, I just wanted to put my head down and get through my final year at university. Things weren’t going to be the same and I felt down about it, but I’d got this far and I wasn’t going to quit now.

When I went home a few weeks into the term, however, my mum spotted that I had very little hair behind my ears. I hadn’t noticed it at all, but when I went back to uni I saw a doctor about it just in case. She told me it wasn’t severe enough to refer me to a dermatologist, so I went away and tried to forget about it.

The diagnosis

‘My relationship break up triggered my hair loss’
Sophie with her mum

COURTESY OF AUTHOR

Christmas came and went, but by this point it had become almost impossible not to notice I was losing my hair; by the time I went back to university in the January I had hardly any left, and a referral to the dermatologist revealed I had alopecia. I didn’t know much about it, and the information was very limited, but when they told me I’d lost too much hair to be eligible for any treatment, it was very hard to deal with. When doctors told me it was likely stress-related, that was even more difficult to process. I couldn’t help but feel like it was partly triggered by everything that had happened over the past year. I’d lost James, I’d lost Fran and now I had lost my hair, too.

When my hair got down to the last few wisps, I went to the hairdressers with a friend to get it shaved off. That in itself was a relief, but it was also a really sad moment because it made it all so definite. I remember thinking then that this was potentially what life was going to be like from now on, so I had to decide if I was going to hate every second of it or if I was going to try to embrace it as much as I could. I tried to embrace it, but it wasn’t easy at times.

Soon, it wasn’t just the hair on my head that had fallen out. My eyebrows had gone, along with my eyelashes, leg hair, arm hair, pubic hair, everywhere. I felt like I looked like an alien.

Moving on

In the four years since my hair first fell out, I’ve had good days and I’ve had bad days. I had my eyebrows tattooed on, which made a massive difference, and I have an Intralace Free Wear System (similar to a wig, but different because it can be worn 24/7 and treated like completely normal hair) from Lucinda Ellery which is so good because you wouldn’t know it’s not my own hair. But on some days it feels like too much of an effort and I can’t be bothered with it; before, I had really long blonde hair and I didn’t really need to think about it much, but putting the free wear system on sometimes takes a lot of effort.

I’ve had some ask me whether I’ve got cancer
COURTESY OF AUTHOR

On those days, I don’t wear it and I’ve had all sorts of comments from people I don’t know; I’ve had some ask me whether I’ve got cancer, and others asking if it’s a fashion statement. I just tell them I’ve got alopecia and explain it’s the body rejecting the hairs because it thinks they’re foreign. Other times, I don’t feel strong enough to handle people staring at me, so I put my free wear system on.

Dating isn’t easy, either. I’ve tried out Tinder, and I try to be very honest so I put photos up of me with and without my false hair on, but I’ve had some dodgy comments from guys. One said to me, “I can’t imagine a girl with no hair giving me a blow job.” I was shocked and angry, so I just replied, “well, you’re never going to know.” Having hair is seen as a very feminine thing, it’s a very sexual thing, so I think it’s difficult for some men that I don’t have any. I can’t see a relationship happening any time soon. My confidence has been knocked a lot and there is that cliché that if you don’t love yourself, then how is anyone else going to love you?

“Losing my hair also feels like I’ve lost my identity”

About 8 months ago, my hair started to grow on my head again. It was looking quite hopeful and I was trying not to get excited, but then it all fell out again. Now, I actually think I would much prefer if my hair never grew back and I would just stay bald, because it’s heartbreaking for it to grow back and then to lose it again. I recently went to the Belgravia Centre in London where they told me the pattern my hair fell out in – starting behind my ears and then snaking across my head – indicates a very high possibility that the hair will never come back. It’s that uncertainty that’s the worst bit, so I’d rather just resign myself to it.

‘My relationship break-up triggered my hair loss’

For me, losing my hair also feels like I’ve lost my identity. I’m still working through it now, and I’ve had therapy because my self-confidence did crash massively. It’s changed how I perceive myself and how I fit into this world. But maybe this new identity I’m discovering for myself is the identity I should have always had. Maybe me without hair is just honestly who I’m meant to be as a person.

[“Source-cosmopolitan”]

Excessive exercise may cause hair loss

Image result for Excessive exercise may cause hair lossFilled Picture: Excessive excuse may lead to hair loss

Excessive exercise places enormous energy demands on the body which may result in hair loss, says hair expert, Dr Adolf Klenk.

Klenk says hair may come under intense stress during physical exertion.

“During high-intensity exercise or sport, muscles consume a huge amount of energy, draining the rest of the body of energy, including the hair. Given that hair is a high-performance organ requiring lots of energy, this causes hair to suffer and may result in hair loss. There is also an increased release of the male hormone testosterone which impacts on hair loss,” said Klenk.

According to  Klenk, caffeine-based shampoos, can help combat hair loss.

“A shampoo that contains caffeine, taurine and special micronutrients including biotin, zinc, magnesium and calcium which stimulates the hair while supporting the metabolic processes needed for strong hair growth,” Klenk said.

Excessive exercise places enormous energy demands on the body which may result in hair loss, says  hair expert, Dr Adolf Klenk.

Klenk says  hair may come under intense stress during physical exertion.

“During high-intensity exercise or sport, muscles consume a huge amount of energy, draining the rest of the body of energy, including the hair. Given that hair is a high-performance organ requiring lots of energy, this causes hair to suffer and may result in hair loss. There is also an increased release of the male hormone testosterone which impacts on hair loss,” said Klenk.

According to  Klenk, caffeine-based shampoos can help combat hair loss.

“Such shampoos contains caffeine, taurine and special micronutrients including biotin, zinc, magnesium and calcium which stimulates the hair while supporting the metabolic processes needed for strong hair growth,” Klenk said.

The caffeine shampoos have been specially developed for active men who have an increased energy demand, he added., he added.

[“Source-iol”]

Are You Having Excessive Hair Loss? Know the Causes

Are You Having Excessive Hair Loss? Know the Causes

Excessive hair loss may be due to many reasons

Losing hair is a natural occurrence and according to a New York based study, on an average, we lose at around 50-100 hair strands on regular basis. And this happens because your hair goes through its cycle where your hair re-grows when you lose them. However, if that cycle disturbs because of certain reasons, you should immediately get your Doctor’s appointment. While choosing a suitable hair shampoo and conditioner are essential to prevent excessive hair loss, there are certain physical and mental reasons which contribute to it. Losing hair also acts as an indicator of your overall health and therefore it is important to be careful about excessive hair loss. Hence, read further to know about the reasons which makes that happen.

1. Hormonal Changes

Imbalanced secretion of hormones in the body causes excessive hair loss. The reasons for this hormonal imbalance is manifold; they can be due to pregnancy, childbirth or the onset of menopause. According to health experts, thyroid problems also distorts hormonal levels.

2. Scalp Infections

Scalp infections like- Ringworm loosens your hair roots and often result in patchy scalp. An unhealthy scalp can cause inflammation that makes it difficult for hair to grow. Skin conditions that lead to hair loss include Seborrheic dermatitis (dandruff), psoriasis and fungal infections.

Seborrheic dermatitis causes the scalp to shed it skin which leads to greasy and yellowish scales on your shoulders or in your hair. It is possibly because of hormonal changes or excess oil in the skin.

3. Hair-Pulling Disorder

Hair-Pulling Disorder is also called trichotillomania which causes people to have an irresistible urge to pull out their hair- from scalp, eyebrows or other areas of the body. This unusual disorder leads to hair loss.

4. Hereditary Hair Loss

Genetic hair loss is known as androgenetic alopecia and according to the American Academy of Dermatology, it is one of the most common cause for hair loss. The gene can be inherited either from your mother or father. If not given timely medical attention, this leads to permanent hair loss.

5. Hyperthyroidism

When your body produces too little thyroid hormone, you are said to have hypothyroidism (or an under-active thyroid). Thyroid hormone is responsible for everything from your basal metabolic rate to the growth of your hair, skin and nails. But when you don’t have the right amount, you may notice changes in bodily functions.

6. Iron Deficiency

Women with heavy blood flow during menstruation or those who intake food with insufficient nutrient content, have unusual loss of hair. The excessive blood flow during periods, often lead to iron deficiency which obstructs the oxygen supply into your blood.

7. Excessive Styling

Too much styling and dyeing can harm your tresses. Heat and chemicals used in styling weakens your hair, causing it to break and fall out. It is, therefore, advisable to style your hair while being mindful of the kind and composition of the hair-color used.

[“Source-doctor.ndtv”]

Hair loss in men: THIS shower habit could be why you’re going bald

Image result for Hair loss in men: THIS shower habit could be why you're going baldThe UK has the fifth highest number of bald men in the world.

Indeed, almost 40 per cent of men in this country are losing their hair.

It’s often hereditary – male pattern baldness or androgenic alopecia, which is related to genes and male sex hormones, accounts for 95 per cent of hair loss in men.

Other reasons for thinning hair include stress, anaemia, protein deficiency and low vitamin levels.

Hair loss: It affects 40 per cent of men in the UK
Bald man
However, surprisingly, a recent study published in JAMA Dermatology found there’s no relationship between hair loss and testosterone levels in men.

If you want to maintain your head of hair for as long as possible, start to pay more attention to your daily grooming habits.

Jumping in and out of the shower as quickly as possible might mean more time in bed, but it could be speeding up you going bald.

That’s because taking the time to massage your head as you shampoo stimulates hair growth.

Man combing hairGETTY

Grooming habits: Not spending long enough in the shower can make a difference

Ananbel Kingsley, trichologist at Philip Kingsley, said: “Scalp massage can be beneficial for those experiencing a gradual reduction in hair volume or hair loss.”

It does this by improving blood flow directly to the area, and by removing dead skin cells which have been proven to cause or worsen hair loss.

She explained: “It should ideally be done for five to ten minutes once to twice a week. It should be gentle yet firm with consistent pressure.

“Using both hands, gently knead your scalp in circular movements starting at the front hairline and gradually working your way back down to the nape of your neck.

“Repeat three to four times, then, with a gentle sweeping action, smooth your hands over the top of your scalp.”

Dr Chris reveals shorter men are more prone to hair loss

Man checking hairGETTY

Thinning hair: It could be due to stress and vitamin deficiency

Additionally, a study published in the International Journal of Neuroscience found that massaging your scalp also lowers hair loss-inducing stress levels.

However, Anabel added: “Scalp massage alone will not have a vast impact on hair growth. Its benefits are highly dependent on what is used during massage – try a stimulating scalp mask.

“Additionally, one of the most common causes of hair loss is the result of iron and ferritin – stored iron – deficiency.

“A healthy diet, eating adequate iron and proteins and taking care of your general health will help prevent both hair loss and hair thinning – and will often improve the general appearance of the hair.”

[“Source-express”]

Getting ‘A-Head’ of Hair Loss

Image result for Getting ‘A-Head’ of Hair LossWhether you’d like to admit it or not, your appearance has a great effect on your everyday life. If your hair starts thinning or balding noticeably, you may find yourself uneasy in public and lacking confidence. Thankfully, there is a way to predict hair loss regardless of your gender and get treatment before your condition worsens.

The cause of hair loss. Hair loss can happen for a variety or combination of reasons, but it holds a close link to your inherited genes. In fact, your hair loss can come from genes on both sides of your family, resulting in a hair situation that is hard to predict.

One important hormone does play a big role in the condition, however, and that hormone is dihydrotestosterone (DHT). DHT actually aids in the development of men’s sex organs but is found in smaller amounts in women.

According to Dr. Alan J. Bauman, who founded Bauman Medical, hair loss occurs due to a heightened sensitivity to DHT, not directly because of the hormone. One of the main reasons for this extra sensitivity is your genes. Since Bauman attests that about 200 genes affect hair growth, you can see why pinpointing the exact combination for hair loss proves so difficult.

A test for baldness. Despite the difficulty, researchers have found a way to predict hair loss. Doctors can perform a genetic test on both men and women, since the test is designed to identify people with a tendency for androgen alopecia. Most women experience hair loss because of this condition.

Doctors perform this test, called HairDX, by simply swabbing the inside of the cheek. They then use the DNA from the test to predict your propensity for baldness. According to Men’s Health, if a man tests positive with this genetic test, he will have a six in 10 chance of going bald before age 40.

HairDX can also test for a genetic variant. Eighty-five percent of men with the variant will not go bald by age 40, helping these men rest more easily. While the test is not certain, you can get a good idea of your genetic disposition by taking the test, no matter your gender.

If you do test positive, you can start treatment immediately, typically with Propecia (for men only) or Rogaine. These treatments are topical and may slow down the hair loss or encourage new growth. If you stop these treatments, the hair loss will continue. These two medications are the only FDA-approved treatments for alopecia.

Hair loss in men. As you have probably guessed, men have a much higher tendency for significant hair loss than women. The American Hair Loss Association states that nearly two thirds of men will experience some type of hair loss by age 35. At the same time, this condition can affect men of any age, starting at the end of puberty. Many men in their early 20s have high amounts of hair loss, and they accept it as a normal part of their lives.

Related: Hair Today, Gone Tomorrow: A Crisis for Teen Girls

Typically, when a man starts losing his hair, he will first see the hair line in the front start to recede. As time goes on, the hair on top of the head will thin out and stop growing altogether. Many times, the hair close to the ears and neck do not get affected in the same way, and researchers don’t currently understand why.

Female pattern hair loss. While women’s hair loss does not occur at the same rate as in men, it happens more often than you think. About a third of women will experience some form of hair loss (alopecia) throughout their lifetime, according to Harvard Health Publications. Also, the American Hair Loss Association reveals that it affects as many as 40 percent of women in the U.S.

Related: Yikes, My Hair Is Thinning

Female pattern hair loss does not usually cause total baldness for a woman, however. She may notice some thinning near the part in her hair and dismiss it initially. After a while, she may see her part widen further and find more hair coming out in the shower or her hairbrush. Intervening early is key for retaining the hair.

Intervening early will help identify any problems.

Both men and women can suffer from hair loss throughout their lives, and the genetic link can come from either side of the family. You can, however, predict the hair loss through a genetic test designed for either gender. Either way, intervening early will identify any problems that could be causing it and help you keep more of your hair for a longer time.

Dr. Manny Alvarez serves as Fox News Channel’s senior managing health editor. He also serves as chairman of the department of obstetrics/gynecology and reproductive science at Hackensack University Medical Center in New Jersey. This Fox News article is used by permission; it first appeared on AskDrManny.com.

[“Source-lifezette”]

This Master Barber Has Some Advice About Hair Loss

And also some pretty solid grooming tips.

Fellas, as we adjust to these warmer months of summer, it’s imperative that we understand how to maintain proper grooming as it relates to our hair and facial hair.

No matter how fly your wardrobe is, if you don’t look presentable or know how to maintain one of the most integral parts of our image, it’s pointless.

I asked a couple of guys to send us questions they wanted answered by AXE Hair master barber Pedro Rosario. I chatted with Pedro to get some grooming tips and advice based on what our readers wanted to know. Here is what he had to say.

BET: When guys shave their face, which method is better, razor shave or clipper shave, and why?

Pedro Rosario: Honestly, it depends on your skin. There are some men that, no matter how well they prep their skin or how good their razor is, they feel irritation. A clipper shave is never going to be as close as a razor, but it is the best way to avoid feeling razor burn or getting bumps. When done the right, a razor shave is amazing; it’s just not going to be appreciated by everyone because of sensitivity.

BET: How can Black men avoid ingrown hairs?

PR: One of the best ways to avoid ingrown hairs is to give the razor a break and buzz your face with clippers or an edger. Also, a good face scrub for a deep clean and to remove dead skin from your face.

BET: What is the best treatment for ingrown hairs?

PR: Unfortunately, one of the best treatments for ingrown hairs is a bit painful. You literally need to remove the hair out of the bump with a pair of tweezers. Once it heals, which takes a while, the skin will be much smoother with proper care.

BET: Is there a proper way to shave?

PR: There is absolutely a proper way to shave. Follow these steps:

  • Wash face thoroughly.
  • Use a hot towel/hot water to open pores.
  • Apply pre-shave oil.
  • Apply lather.
  • Shave with the grain, not against. It’s not as close but it will help prevent bumps.
  • Apply cold towel or cold water to close the pores.
  • Use a quality after shave and/or moisturizer.

BET: What do you recommend for men who suffer from hair loss?

PR: Losing your hair is a humbling experience for anyone. Your options are very limited if you can’t afford surgery. I recommend Axe Daily Thickening Shampoo as a day-to day-option as you fight the valiant fight. Its blended with caffeine and this gives your hair a thicker look and feel for easy styling.

BET: What’s the best product for post-shaving for Black men?

PR: Any good moisturizer or after shave works well. One trick I like using is an ice-cold towel to close the pores after a shave and to soothe the skin.

B: What treatment is there for Black guys who suffer from dry scalp?

PR: There are a few options to choose from. A few drops any tea tree, argan or Moroccan oil rubbed deep into the scalp after washing the hair once or twice weekly should work well.

BET: How can you tell when your barber has taken your hairline back too far? What do you recommend to correct it?

PR: You can usually tell when a barber pushed the hairline back a day or two after it starts to grow out. You’ll notice a slight shadow and a double line, the new one and the natural one. The best way to correct it is buy a hat, find a new barber and get a better shape up in a week.

BET: What is your advice when switching your haircut style and trying to stay ahead of trends without going too far left?

PR: When choosing a new haircut, its always best to consult with your barber and get their input based on your texture and head shape. They can guide you through a style change and keep you neat if you’re going from short too long.

(Photo: Westend61/Getty Images)

B: Without insulting any of your clients, what hairstyle or grooming trend do you think needs to be retired?

PR: The man bun. If you’re not a samurai or a yogi, it’s time to let it go.

B: Hair units for men, do you think this trend will last?

PR: I think that variations of hair replacements, paint jobs and any product that creates the illusion of hair will last until someone finally invents the magic pill that regrows hair. Men are vain even if we pretend not to be and our hair is part of our identity. I tell guys buzz it or shave it all off, join a gym, get a tailored suit and a nice pair of shoes and their confidence will be restored to the maximum.

[“Source-bet”]

Julia Lipscombe: Postpartum hair loss is no joke — but it grows back

Julia Lipscombe, with her son Indiana in their Edmonton home on Feb. 2, 2017, noticed a few strands of hair fall from her head about three and a half months after her son was born.David Bloom / Postmedia

“Thinking about getting pregnant again so that my hair stops falling out.”

It was an innocent Facebook post a few months ago. And, for the record, I’m not recommending that.

The post was just a joke that I thought would make a couple of people smile. But it ended up being one of the most popular mom-related things I’ve ever put on social media.

The women in my larger Internet circle really wanted to talk about their hair falling out. And mostly, it seemed, this was one of those things they hadn’t been prepared for.

Personally, I’d heard about the glossy, shiny and thick hair you’re supposed to acquire during pregnancy. I hadn’t been aware, however, that after you give birth you will be leaving a trail of DNA behind you everywhere you go.

My hair loss went something like this.

At three-and-a-half months postpartum, I noticed a few strands of my almost chin-length bob coming out in my hands in the shower. It wasn’t gradual — from that moment on, I couldn’t touch my hair without several coming loose.

There are a few different causes for postpartum hair-loss, said Dr. Jonathan Tankel, an obstetrician gynecologist working at the Hys Centre and the University of Alberta’s University Health Centre.

“By far, the most common cause is called telogen effluvium. There’s different phases of hair development — there’s a growth phase, and a resting phase. (In this case), the resting phase, where you lose the hair, tends to be accelerated and the growth phase is decreased.”

Telogen effluvium isn’t exclusive to women who’ve given birth, and can also occur when someone has had major stress, a major surgery or has nutritional deficiencies, for example.

There are two types of this condition — acute, the kind most women will experience after childbirth, and chronic.

“The acute type will usually occur in the first few weeks or months after childbirth and most people will start regrowing their hair by a year or a year-and-a-half afterward,” said Tankel.

In other words, most people shouldn’t stress too much about it.

But how much hair loss is too much?

“If someone is having hair-loss that is ongoing for more than a year, it’s worth seeing their primary care physician, just to make sure there’s no other cause. For example, we would generally check people’s blood count, we would check their iron.”

He also suggests seeking help from a family doctor or dermatologist if the hair loss is causing psychological distress, or if it’s showing cosmetically.

I was pretty lucky.

The shedding slowed down by five-and-a-half months postpartum, and by six months it had altogether stopped. My hair is not noticeably thinner.

But, there’s another thing they don’t tell you about — regrowth.

My now legitimately chin-length, curly brown bob is accented by a ring of short, copper-brown curls that stick out around my face like a crown — including new short sideburns. I love curly hair, but the inconsistency is pretty funny.

When I wear my hair down, it looks like I have a tangled nest around my head before my regular hair starts. And when it’s up, I have a sort of Orphan Annie thing going on. My hairstylist, Quinn, is able to straighten and therefore hide the tiny hairs when I see her for special events, but I can’t do it at home for everyday.

On the grand scale of life’s annoyances, this is tiny and insignificant. Hair grows back. I joked to my mom friends that I’m paying more attention to wearing cute outfits so that people don’t look at my mane. Ball caps have become my best friend.

I wonder though, is there anything I could have done to be proactive? To stop the shed in the first place? Can I make my little wisps grow faster? My original Facebook post resulted in plenty of tips that some of my friends swore by. But I’m skeptical about most miracle beauty cures.

Tankel suggests that supplementing with iron might make a difference, but is uncertain about other remedies. “Some studies showed that taking extra iron — even if the iron levels weren’t low to begin with — could make a difference.

“There are other supplements that people use. For example, some people use zinc, some people use biotin, some people use vitamin D. But there’s no clear proof that they work. I can’t say that (they definitely don’t work), but I’m not aware of any clear evidence that they do.”

Vance Elliott, of the Advanced Hair and Cosmetic Medicine and Surgery Clinic, agrees.

“There’s no harm in taking biotin, but it doesn’t do anything,” he said. “But there is also treatment that does work.”

Like Tankel, Elliott suggests that postpartum women experiencing hair loss for a year should see a doctor. And if you’re worried about it, he said, there’s no harm in seeing a doctor before then.

“If they’re concerned that their hair isn’t going back to normal or is continuing to thin, they should have it looked at. I don’t like the idea that treatment gets delayed for someone just because it gets chalked up to, ‘This is what happens after babies’.”

Elliott said that significant, prolonged hair-loss after childbirth can, in some cases, be the onset of female pattern hair loss.

“If someone genetically has inherited the genes that predisposes them to female pattern hair-loss, sometimes pregnancy or their series of pregnancies can be what kicks that off.”

If you’ve seen your physician and determined your hair loss is outside of the postpartum norm, there are two main medical treatments that are effective, said Elliott.

“Minoxidil, which is also on the market as the brand name Rogaine, which is a topical medicine. And low-level laser therapy, which is not medication. It’s a laser modality that’s applied to the scalp externally.”

You can undergo laser therapy while breastfeeding, said Elliott. But the safety of Minoxidil during breastfeeding is not known and Elliott recommends discussing either option with an obstetrician or family doctor first if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding.

For most of us, though, the worst things we’ll have to deal with is a drain full of hair and all that pesky regrowth.

“It’s a normal thing,” said Tankel. “In the vast majority of people, the hair will come back.”

In the meantime, it’s summer — invest in a good floppy hat.

[“Source-nationalpost”]