Parts of Mediterranean diet shown to prevent colorectal cancer

mediterranean diet components

New research singles out a few key elements of the Mediterranean diet that are most important for colorectal health.
The benefits of the so-called Mediterranean diet have been hailed in the news over recent years. Now, new research looks closely at the elements of the diet that could help to prevent the risk of colorectal cancer.

Among many other benefits, the Mediterranean diet has been shown to lower the risk of colorectal cancer. But the specifics of this beneficial role have not been studied in depth.

New research – presented at the ESMO 19th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, held in Barcelona, Spain – singles out the few components of the Mediterranean diet key for preventing colorectal cancer. The first author of the study is Naomi Fliss Isakov, Ph.D., of the Tel-Aviv Medical Center in Israel.

More specifically, the research looks at the link between the components of the diet taken both separately and in combination, as well as the risk of developing advanced colorectal polyps.

Colorectal cancer tends to develop from advanced polyps, or adenoma. However, the chances of polyps becoming malignant depend on various factors, including size, structure, and location.

Zooming in on the Mediterranean diet

Dr. Isakov and team examined 808 people who were undergoing either screening or diagnostic colonoscopies.

The participants were aged between 40 and 70 years old and were not at a high risk of colorectal cancer. The researchers took anthropometric measurements – such as body mass index (BMI) and height – of the participants, and they asked them to fill in a food frequency questionnaire. They also took part in a medical and lifestyle interview.

The researchers defined adherence to the Mediterranean diet as an above-average consumption of fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and whole grains, as well as fish and poultry.

A below-median intake of red meat, alcohol, and soft drinks was also considered to be a key component of the diet. A Mediterranean diet was also described as having “a high ratio of monounsaturated to saturated fatty acids.”

For the purposes of the study, the researchers defined advanced polyps as adenomas larger than 10 millimeters in size, with a “high-grade dysplasia or villous histology.”

As the American Cancer Society (ACS) explain, the term “dysplasia” refers to the abnormal aspect of the polyps. “High-grade dysplasia” is a term used to describe polyps that appear abnormal or cancer-like. The ACS also note that larger adenomas tend to have a villous growth pattern and are more likely to lead to cancer.

Dr. Isakov and colleagues also examined healthy controls who did not have any polyps, either in the past or at the time of the study.

More fish, fruit reduces risk

Having compared individuals with polyp-free colonoscopies and those whose colonoscopy showed advanced polyps, the authors found a clear association between components of the Mediterranean diet and the risk of colorectal cancer.

People with advanced polyps reported consuming fewer elements of the Mediterranean diet. More specifically, the average was 1.9 Mediterranean diet components in the advanced polyps group, compared with 4.5 components in the polyp-free group.

Surprisingly, even two or three elements of the diet correlated with a 50 percent reduction in the risk of advanced polyps, compared with consuming no key components at all.

Additionally, the risk further decreased as the number of Mediterranean elements increased. The more elements of the Mediterranean diet people consumed, the lower were the chances of advanced polyps showing up in their colonoscopies.

The researchers adjusted for other risk factors associated with colorectal cancer and found that increased fish and fruit consumption, together with a low intake of soft drinks, was most likely to reduce the risk of advanced polyps.

We found that each one of these three choices was associated with a little more than 30 percent reduced odds of a person having an advanced, pre-cancerous colorectal lesion, compared to people who did not eat any of the MD [Mediterranean diet] components.”

Naomi Fliss Isakov, Ph.D.

She concluded, “Among people who made all three healthy choices the benefit was compounded to almost 86 percent reduced odds.”

ESMO spokesperson Dr. Dirk Arnold, of the Instituto CUF de Oncologia in Lisbon, Portugal, also comments on the findings, saying, “This large population-based cohort-control study impressively confirms the hypothesis of an association of colorectal polyps with diets and other lifestyle factors.”

“This stands in line with other very recent findings on nutritive effects, such as the potential protective effects of nut consumption and vitamin D supplementation which have been shown earlier this year.”

“However,” adds Dr. Arnold, “it remains to be seen whether these results are associated with reduced mortality, and it is also unclear if, and when a dietary change would be beneficial.”

Next, the authors plan to investigate the effects of the Mediterranean diet in a group at high risk of developing colorectal cancer.

[“Source-medicalnewstoday”]

Thousands of cancer patients dying in needless agony, new data reveals

Nursing holding hands with patient

Poorly coordinated care for those at home plays a large part CREDIT: PASCAL LACHENAUD/AFP

Thousands of cancer patients are dying in needless pain because of disjointed care for people who have returned home to be with loved ones, experts have warned.

New data reveals one in ten people who die of cancer have inadequate pain relief in their final 48 hours.

Charities have criticised the Office for National Statistics figures as “unacceptable”, and called on the Government to make good on its manifesto pledge to improve the standard of palliative care.

Macmillan Cancer Support, which conducted the analysis, said fears of uncontrollable pain were cancer patients’ top concern as they approached the end of life.

There’s no excuse for so many people with cancer still not getting the support they need at the end of their livesLynda Thomas, Macmillan Cancer Support

The organisation says 12,000 people who died from the disease in 2015 were not cared for properly in the final stages.

Many of these were outside hospital and reliant on community services such as visiting nurses to receive pain-relieving drugs.

The ONS statistics showed patients were four times more likely to die in pain at home than in hospital.

Macmillan said their research revealed that of the people who felt services had not worked properly when they had been treated at home, 72% also had poor pain relief.

Lynda Thomas, the charity’s chief executive, said: “There’s no excuse for so many people with cancer still not getting the support they need at the end of their lives.

“Absolutely no one should suffer unnecessary pain in their final days – with the right support this can be avoidable.

“We need better-coordinated, round-the-clock community care to help prevent this anguish.

The last year the Government committed to providing high quality end-of-life care to all patients regardless of location, a pledge that was repeated in the General Election manifesto.

“The Government must now make these promises a reality and end the variation in the quality of care people receive,” said Ms Thomas.

“Things cannot carry on the way they are.”

A Department of Health spokesperson said: “Cancer survival is at a record high and we are fully committed to improving cancer outcomes for everyone, including palliative care, which we know is not always good enough.

“That’s exactly why our strategy for achieving world-class cancer outcomes includes a clear commitment to ensure earlier access to palliative support, which we expect NHS England to deliver for patients.”

[“Source-telegraph”]

How to keep skin looking young? We asked the experts

Image result for How to keep skin looking young? We asked the experts

The beauty market is awash with anti-aging products, and the lists of ingredients in serums and creams that promise to slow down or reverse that process can be confounding.

Take a look at the fine print and you might encounter Vitamin C or green tea extract or alpha-hydroxy acids. Can anything make a difference?

We checked in with a handful of experts, including Dr. Gregory Henderson, a dermatologist and clinical instructor in dermatology at UCLA, in our search for answers.

By the way, cosmetics companies test their products extensively. The Food and Drug Administration does not test products, but can take action against a manufacturer if it has concerns over product safety.

Charcoal

Activated charcoal, which can absorb some toxins, has been used to treat alcohol and drug poisoning in emergency rooms for decades. But in the last few years, the beauty industry has embraced it, touting its ability to absorb dirt and oil. Can it be effective?

“When used as part of a mask or strip,” Henderson says, “the charcoal may help remove sebum and keratinous debris from skin pores.”

Clay and mud

Mud is sometimes used in masks that are used to hydrate the skin and is acknowledged by many in the medical community for its potential to help with skin issues. “Mud therapy,” says Henderson, “is an ancient tradition and historically has been used for inflammatory skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis.”

Clay is one of the most common ingredients found in beauty products, and experts tend to agree that it can serve a useful purpose, if used according to directions. Clay masks, designed to remove oil, dirt and dead skin cells, can be used as a delivery mechanism for ingredients — oils and emollients, for example — to ease dry skin.

Sodium hyaluronate

Sodium hyaluronate, which is used in all sorts of wrinkle and skin-repair products, is a “cousin of hyaluronic acid, a naturally occurring substance in the skin which helps hang on to water and helps give the skin a younger appearance,” says UCLA dermatologist Dr. Hayley Goldbach.

“Dermatologists often inject hyaluronic acid fillers into skin, resulting in more volume and a reduction in fine lines.” Sodium hyaluronate, designed to be applied to the skin, “has not been shown to have the same anti-aging or collagen-boosting properties as injectable hyaluronic acid.” But it continues to be included in various medical studies and papers that are focused on the efficacy of various anti-aging products.

Alpha hydroxy acids

According to Medscape, an online reference source used by medical professionals, AHAs (including glycolic and citric acids) “improve skin texture and reduce the signs of aging by promoting cell shedding” in the outer layers of the skin. But “the mechanism of the action is not completely understood.”

Caffeine

Caffeine is used in cosmetics and cosmeceuticals to counter a number of skin conditions, including the appearance of cellulite. It works, in theory, “by stimulating lipolysis — the breaking down of fat — in the skin and by improving the microcirculation,” Henderson says.

Caffeine is also found in some eye creams, promoted by cosmetic lines for its ability to shrink blood vessels under the eyes, although “its role has not been well studied.”

Green tea extract

In the last few years, there’s been a surge in the use of green tea extract in beauty products. WebMD reports that “the ingredients in tea can reduce sun damage and may protect you from skin cancer when you put it on your skin.” Henderson says that “a study combining green tree extract, caffeine and resveratrol showed reduced facial redness.”

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is one of the most popular ingredients in anti-aging products, promoted as something that can protect cells from free radicals, which can damage cell DNA, increase signs of aging and lead to cancer.

Some experts say the antioxidants found in vitamin C can assist the body’s production of collagen. But Henderson cautions: “While limited studies have shown that topical vitamin C may limit photoaging, many current preparations … are not formulated to allow the vitamin C to effectively penetrate the skin. Also unless protected from the air, most preparation became inactive without hours of opening.”

Peptides

Peptides, formed from amino acids, are “cellular messengers” of sorts and are commonly used in beauty products. According to Henderson, signal peptides may stimulate collagen production. Carrier peptides “may aid in the delivery of copper to the skin and promote smoother skin.” (Copper is said to help develop collagen and elastin.)

Algae

Many of us associate algae with unpleasant encounters in the water (seaweed, pond scum, etc.), but algae have been used in traditional diets and folk medicine for centuries.

In the beauty world, you might read about ingredients such as blue marine algae or brown algae extract. You won’t find universal agreement on their effectiveness in cosmeceuticals, but an article in the Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology suggests brown seaweed “could be used as a potential cosmetic ingredient to make skin firmer and smoother.”

The bottom line?

Some of the ingredients listed in the fine print on cosmetics and cosmeceuticals may actually help your skin. But what the experts really hope you’ll indulge in are rest, exercise, a healthy diet and sunscreen.

[“Source-latimes”]

Yoga can cause musculoskeletal pain

woman doing the downward dog pose

While yoga can help to alleviate pain, research shows that it can also cause it.
Yoga is often hailed as an effective practice for pain relief. A new study, however, notes that yoga can also cause pain, and yoga-related injuries are much more common than one may think.

The research suggests that every year, more than 10 percent of people who practice yogain a recreational capacity experience musculoskeletal pain, particularly in the upper limbs, as a result.

What is more, the study found that yoga actually worsens more than a fifth of existing injuries.

Lead study author Prof. Evangelos Pappas, of the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Sydney in Australia, and colleagues recently reported their findings in the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies.

Yoga is one of the most common mind and body practices in the United States, and its popularity is increasing. According to a survey conducted by Yoga Alliance last year, around 37 million U.S. adults practice yoga, a significant rise from 20 million in 2012.

But why is yoga so appealing? Aside from its stress-relieving effects, one reason why people are attracted to yoga is its ability to ease pain. A recent study reported by Medical News Today found that for low back pain, yoga is just as beneficial as physical therapy.

However, the new study from Prof. Pappas and team suggests that caution should be applied when practicing yoga, as it could do more harm than good.

Upper limb pain most common

For their study, the researchers analyzed the data of 354 adults who engaged in recreational yoga.

Participants completed two electronic questionnaires 1 year apart, which gathered information on any musculoskeletal pain they might have, where in the body this pain occurred, and pain severity.

The data revealed that 10.7 percent of participants experienced musculoskeletal pain as a result of yoga.

“In terms of severity, more than one third of cases of pain caused by yoga were serious enough to prevent yoga participation and lasted more than 3 months,” notes Prof. Pappas.

Pain in the upper extremities – including the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hand – was the most common type of pain caused by yoga, which Prof. Pappas speculates may be down to “postures that put weight on the upper limbs,” such as the downward dog.

For subjects with pre-existing musculoskeletal injuries, around 21 percent of these injuries were exacerbated by yoga participation, the team reports. Pre-existing upper limb pain was most affected by yoga.

Injury rate higher than previous reports

However, the study also brought some positive news; around 74 percent of participants reported that their pre-existing musculoskeletal pain had improved as a result of yoga.

Still, the researchers believe that their findings highlight the need for caution when it comes to practicing yoga, especially for people who already have musculoskeletal pain.

“Our study found that the incidence of pain caused by yoga is more than 10 percent per year,” says Prof. Pappas, “which is comparable to the injury rate of all sports injuries combined among the physically active population.”

However people consider it to be a very safe activity. This injury rate is up to 10 times higher than has previously been reported.”

Prof. Evangelos Pappas

The researchers say that their findings may help both healthcare professionals and patients to compare the risks of yoga with other types of physical activity, allowing them to make informed decisions about which form of exercise is best.

“We recommend that yoga teachers also discuss with their students the risks for injury if not practiced conscientiously, and the potential for yoga to exacerbate some injuries,” adds Prof. Pappas.

“Yoga participants are encouraged to discuss the risks of injury and any pre-existing pain, especially in the upper limbs, with yoga teachers and physiotherapists to explore posture modifications that may result in safer practice.”

[“Source-medicalnewstoday”]

This Master Barber Has Some Advice About Hair Loss

And also some pretty solid grooming tips.

Fellas, as we adjust to these warmer months of summer, it’s imperative that we understand how to maintain proper grooming as it relates to our hair and facial hair.

No matter how fly your wardrobe is, if you don’t look presentable or know how to maintain one of the most integral parts of our image, it’s pointless.

I asked a couple of guys to send us questions they wanted answered by AXE Hair master barber Pedro Rosario. I chatted with Pedro to get some grooming tips and advice based on what our readers wanted to know. Here is what he had to say.

BET: When guys shave their face, which method is better, razor shave or clipper shave, and why?

Pedro Rosario: Honestly, it depends on your skin. There are some men that, no matter how well they prep their skin or how good their razor is, they feel irritation. A clipper shave is never going to be as close as a razor, but it is the best way to avoid feeling razor burn or getting bumps. When done the right, a razor shave is amazing; it’s just not going to be appreciated by everyone because of sensitivity.

BET: How can Black men avoid ingrown hairs?

PR: One of the best ways to avoid ingrown hairs is to give the razor a break and buzz your face with clippers or an edger. Also, a good face scrub for a deep clean and to remove dead skin from your face.

BET: What is the best treatment for ingrown hairs?

PR: Unfortunately, one of the best treatments for ingrown hairs is a bit painful. You literally need to remove the hair out of the bump with a pair of tweezers. Once it heals, which takes a while, the skin will be much smoother with proper care.

BET: Is there a proper way to shave?

PR: There is absolutely a proper way to shave. Follow these steps:

  • Wash face thoroughly.
  • Use a hot towel/hot water to open pores.
  • Apply pre-shave oil.
  • Apply lather.
  • Shave with the grain, not against. It’s not as close but it will help prevent bumps.
  • Apply cold towel or cold water to close the pores.
  • Use a quality after shave and/or moisturizer.

BET: What do you recommend for men who suffer from hair loss?

PR: Losing your hair is a humbling experience for anyone. Your options are very limited if you can’t afford surgery. I recommend Axe Daily Thickening Shampoo as a day-to day-option as you fight the valiant fight. Its blended with caffeine and this gives your hair a thicker look and feel for easy styling.

BET: What’s the best product for post-shaving for Black men?

PR: Any good moisturizer or after shave works well. One trick I like using is an ice-cold towel to close the pores after a shave and to soothe the skin.

B: What treatment is there for Black guys who suffer from dry scalp?

PR: There are a few options to choose from. A few drops any tea tree, argan or Moroccan oil rubbed deep into the scalp after washing the hair once or twice weekly should work well.

BET: How can you tell when your barber has taken your hairline back too far? What do you recommend to correct it?

PR: You can usually tell when a barber pushed the hairline back a day or two after it starts to grow out. You’ll notice a slight shadow and a double line, the new one and the natural one. The best way to correct it is buy a hat, find a new barber and get a better shape up in a week.

BET: What is your advice when switching your haircut style and trying to stay ahead of trends without going too far left?

PR: When choosing a new haircut, its always best to consult with your barber and get their input based on your texture and head shape. They can guide you through a style change and keep you neat if you’re going from short too long.

(Photo: Westend61/Getty Images)

B: Without insulting any of your clients, what hairstyle or grooming trend do you think needs to be retired?

PR: The man bun. If you’re not a samurai or a yogi, it’s time to let it go.

B: Hair units for men, do you think this trend will last?

PR: I think that variations of hair replacements, paint jobs and any product that creates the illusion of hair will last until someone finally invents the magic pill that regrows hair. Men are vain even if we pretend not to be and our hair is part of our identity. I tell guys buzz it or shave it all off, join a gym, get a tailored suit and a nice pair of shoes and their confidence will be restored to the maximum.

[“Source-bet”]

This is the Astounding Impact Exercise has for Older Americans

Beyond keeping in shape, exercise can reverse the effects of aging on your body and fight brain decline.

Exercise has long been touted as an essential aspect of a healthy lifestyle, so it will come as no surprise to hear that if you don’t exercise, you should start.

What may surprise you, however, is the astounding effects exercise can have during your golden years. Beyond keeping in shape, exercise can reverse the effects of aging on your body and fight brain decline.

Sound too good to be true? Fortunately, research backs up these claims.

Reverse physical aging

After the first few decades of your life, you likely noticed your energy levels were sapped earlier in the day than they used to be and that it was harder to keep healthy. Generally, these changes are only exacerbated with time.

“Even the most athletically fit cannot escape these changes,” the National Institute on Aging said. “Take marathon runners, for example. An NIA-funded study found that their record times increased with age — aging literally slowed down the runners.”

At its most basic level, aging changes your cells. For example, lung tissue loses elasticity and rib cage muscles shrink, so the amount of air you inhale in a breath decreases, according to the NIA. Your gut produces fewer digestive enzymes, making it difficult to absorb nutrients. Your heart’s blood vessels accumulate fatty deposits.

Enough of the bad news. The good news is you can fight the breakdown.

For example, researchers found that high-intensity interval training can slow the decline of aging. Also called HIIT, this type of training involves doing a workout that goes back and forth between intense exercise and recovery periods.

Study participants did both HIIT workouts and resistance training — working out with weights — for 12 weeks, and researchers said HIIT was the workout that made the biggest difference to aerobic capacity and cells in the muscles.

Before being scared away by the words “high intensity,” consider all the workouts you can do. For example, one workout designed for seniors involves running and walking on a treadmill in this pattern:

  • Work interval: 20-second sprint
  • Rest interval: 90-second walk
  • Repeat 4-6 times
  • Cool down: 5-minute walk

If running isn’t your thing, incorporate the same pattern of exercise and rest in any activity you like such as swimming, cycling, weightlifting and so on.

Fight brain decline

Perhaps the idea that exercise can reverse aging’s physical effects makes sense, but understanding how it strengthens brain function is a little harder to grasp. Well, here’s the scoop.

Multiple studies have found that physical activity, particularly aerobic exercise, enhances cognitive function. That means exercise helps with activities in the brain including memory, attention span, language skills, logic and reasoning. These studies show exercise has “substantial benefits” according to an article published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest journal.

Exercise isn’t the only way to fight cognitive decline. Socializing and cognitive activities like doing puzzles or learning a language can also help. Still, “physical activity has the most support as protective against the deleterious effects of age on health and cognition” according to an article in the Journal of Aging Research.

These deleterious, or harmful, effects include more than just occasional forgetfulness. Physical activity can help delay the onset of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in people who are 65 or older, according to research in the Annals of Internal Medicine journal.

All 1,740 participants were cognitively intact at the beginning of the study. After six years, the people who exercised at least three times per week had a lower rate of dementia than those who exercised less.

“These results suggest that regular exercise is associated with a delay in onset of dementia and Alzheimer disease, further supporting its value for elderly persons,” the researchers write.

Get started

As research shows, there is every reason you should exercise, even if you never have before. Don’t let common myths about exercise — such as exercise not being safe — get in your way. Of course, before you start any exercise program, you should always consult with your physician.

ComForCare of Palm Beach Gardens is the premier provider of private-duty, non-medical home health care allowing people to age comfortably, safely and happily in place. Services include meal preparation, light housekeeping, grooming and hygiene help, transportation assistance, medication reminders and more. Caregivers can even go on walks with those they care for or help them safely complete approved exercise routines. To learn more, visit comforcare.com/palmbeach.

[“Source-cbs12.”]

HOW TO GET RID OF DARK CIRCLES UNDER THE EYES

dark-circles-lead-image.jpg

What is the best way to banish under-eye bags? / Getty/iStockphoto

A build-up of late nights, early mornings and constant use of smartphones has left many of us with burdened by the appearance of dark under-eye circles but just how do you get rid of them?

Something we all struggle with, you’ve no doubt Googled the best way to banish your bags but a regular routine of seven to eight hours sleep and not drinking any alcohol before bed just isn’t always feasible.

Alas, it’s time hit refresh on tired peepers with a little help from some well-versed beauty heroes.

Aside from getting more kip, staying hydrated is key because when the body is starved of water, it responds by retaining as much as it can, thus causing puffy under-eye circles. As such, opt for a hydrating, gentle cleanser or make-up remover so not to cause any trauma or irritation which could cause inflammation.

Alternatively, there are a slew of topical treatments that can help you on your way. The first of which is retinoids which help to stimulate the production of collagen, making the skin less thin while recovering volume and firmness.

A word of warning here though, this ingredient when used in its purest form is rather potent and as such, can irritate the sensitive skin around the eye area. Instead, opt for a cream that contains a lower dose of retinol and work from there.

When it comes to applying said eye creams, other key ingredients to look out for include hyaluronic acid and glycerin. For best results, apply at night so the skin around your eyes doesn’t become irritated or inflamed and again in the morning.

If you feel like your moisturiser could do with a boost, using an eye massager like Foreo’s IRIS will do the trick. Known to promote blood flow to the area, regular use of a beauty tool like this will prevent blood from pooling in the capillaries under the eyes and increase product absorption.

When all else fails, remember you’ve still got makeup and a hardworking concealer will work wonders while you’re attempting to improve your eye bags.

Here, look to the beauty world’s obsession with colour correcting and opt for a cover-up that will counteract dark circles. If yours err towards a bluish purple tone then a yellow concealer is best while any redness should be tackled with a green-tones product to help camouflage it.

[“Source-independent”]

Magnetic Eye Implant Stops Dancing Eyes Syndrome

Illustration: Magnetic Eye Prosthetic

A 49-year-old man finally got relief from a rare, maddening eye disorder after researchers, in an experimental procedure, implanted specialized magnets beneath his eyeballs. The disorder, called nystagmus, or dancing eyes, causes the eyes to oscillate rhythmically, making the visual scene constantly shake. Scientists from University College London steadied the man’s gaze by surgically implanting in each eye a pair of titanium-encased rare-earth magnets. The researchers reported the case study Saturday in the journal Ophthalmology.

Researchers have come up with all sorts of clever bioengineering solutions that involve magnets and the human body, but never one quite like this, says Parashkev Nachev, a neurologist at University College London who led the experiment. For example, engineers have designed small robots guided by magnetic fields that move through the body to do various jobs, such as perform surgery, navigate blood vessels, deliver drugs, palpate tissue, and take biopsies. And doctors have attached prostheses such as artificial noses to the body using magnets.

Nachev’s implant moves magnets into a new biomedical domain—one his team dubbed “oculomotor prosthetics.” The magnets he and his team used are made of samarium-cobalt and neodymium-iron-boron, which are rare-earth materials that are fairly common in the magnet world. They’re encased in titanium to make them biocompatible. And they’re small, of course—about three millimeters in diameter and one-to-two millimeters long.

The device is simple and the surgery is quick. In each eye, a surgeon sutures the samarium-cobalt magnet to the tendon of the muscle on the underside of the eye and superglues—yes, superglues—the neodymium-iron-boron magnet to the eye socket. “Ophthalmologists love superglue and they use it a lot,” says Nachev. When the 30-minute procedure is completed, the magnets attract with enough pull to steady the dancing eye, but not so much that voluntary eye movement is hindered, the researchers report.

Nachev’s team also built a machine to test the force of the magnets before implanting them. They wanted to make sure the magnets were strong enough to stop oscillation but not strong enough to impede voluntary eye movement.

Nystagmus can be maddening for patients, says Nachev. When the condition pops up later in life, it often accompanies other problems of the central nervous system, such as multiple sclerosis or degenerative conditions. Because the cause of nystagmus is broad and complex, no single drug seems to work for most patients. Among drugs that do work “the effects are not usually dramatic,” says Nachev.

The patient in Nachev’s case study, who asked to remain anonymous, had tried every drug in the book, with no relief. His vision and stability got so bad he lost his job as a truck driver and became unemployed.

So, he asked his doctors about experimental treatments. Nachev’s team had heard about an oral presentation from a Brazilian ophthalmologist named Harley Bicas who, a decade ago, had proposed the concept of using magnets to steady dancing eyes. Nachev’s team took up the concept and designed a prototype with help from Quentin Pankhurst, a professor of physics and biomedical engineering at University College London.

After the surgery, Nachev’s patient saw an immediate and obvious improvement. “His world doesn’t shake as badly as it used to,” Nachev says. The man was able to get a job—although not as a driver—and has had the implants for nearly five years now.

Though the experiment was a success, it has yet to be conducted in any other patients. Nachev’s team is planning to test the magnets in another 6 to 12 people in an upcoming study. They also hope to explore other applications, such as modifying the functioning of the eyelids or changing the movement of the eyes in response to other oculomotor disorders. One could even add an electromagnetic component with an externally powered unit, enabling the force of the magnets to be varied on the fly depending on what the patient is doing.

But there’s one big drawback. Anyone sporting magnets in their bodies runs into a major obstacle: They can’t get an MRI. That could be a significant problem for people with nystagmus who often have other neurological issues that require monitoring by MRI. The machine images the body using strong magnetic fields and could, to put it in the least grotesque way, “displace” the magnets in a patient’s body. “I hate to even think about it,” says Nachev.

[“Source-spectrum”]

The Core Exercise Trainers Love (No, It’s Not A Plank)

We’re not here to play games: The truth is, there’s no magical workout move that does it all. However, there are certain exercises that set you up to move better and lift things more easily. Many of these involve strengthening your core, because a strong midsection is essential for every workout, sport, and fitness activity — not to mention daily life. And that’s where the core reach (also known as the dead-bug exercise) comes in.
This move — think of it as a flipped-over version of a moving plank — is functional, safe, and strengthens the same muscles you use for everything from doing squats to hauling groceries. It’s also especially useful for runners because it teaches trunk stability and control while you’re moving your arms and legs in opposition. This mirrors what you do when you’re walking and running, explains Ashleigh Kast, trainer at Drive Clubs in New York City and founder of Sophisticated Strength. This stability helps establish a more efficient stride pattern that controls breathing and prevents lower back pain often caused by poor running form.
You can include the core reach as part of your warm-up before a gym workout or run, or try it as a quick exercise first thing in the morning. Plus, it’s simple to increase or decrease the intensity level depending on where you are in your fitness journey. Just lace up a pair of supportive and cushiony adidas UltraBOOST X sneakers and follow along with brand ambassador Jera Foster-Fell. Time to kick-start your workout.
The Core Reach
Start lying on your back with arms extended straight in the air with wrists over shoulders. Bend your knees to a tabletop position, making 90-degree angles with your shins parallel to the floor. While pushing your low back against the ground, extend your right arm overhead and your left leg outward until they hover a few inches off the floor, but not so low that your back arches. Immediately return to the starting position, and repeat on the opposite side. Do 10 reps on each side, alternating arms and legs each rep.
“The most common mistake I see people make is beginning with the back arched,” Kast says. Fix this by flattening your back on the floor before you start moving, and be conscious to maintain that position throughout the entire exercise.
“This move is an amazing opportunity to begin linking your breath to your movement, which is key for mastering any exercise or sport,” says Kast. Inhale as you lower your arm and leg and exhale as you pull them back in.
Just Getting Started? Try This Beginner-Friendly Variation
Keep your arms extended by your sides on the ground or directly overhead. Bring your legs into that same tabletop position and — keeping your knees bent at 90 degrees — lower your right heel to tap the ground. Return your leg to the starting position, and repeat with your left leg. By shortening the length of your legs, you reduce the load on your core, thus requiring less stability, and you’re using your arms to help you balance. Do 10 reps on each side, alternating legs each rep.
PHOTOGRAPHED BY MAGDALENA KMIECIK
For More Of A Challenge, Add Some Weight
While holding a five- to 10-pound medicine ball (a kettlebell or single dumbbell does the job, too), extend your arms directly above your head and perpendicular to the floor. Keep your arms in place while extending one leg at a time. The goal here is to create maximum tension in the body, so imagine you’re trying to crush the ball between your hands. This tension helps stabilize your core and adds work for your upper-body muscles. Do 10 reps on each side, alternating legs each rep.
[“Source-refinery29.”]

DEA does not need warrant to subpoena Oregon prescription drug information

A three-member panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Monday that the Drug Enforcement Administration does not need a court-ordered warrant to subpoena information from Oregon's Prescription Drug Monitoring Program. It also found the ACLU should not have been allowed to intervene in the case.  (Associated Press photo)

A three-member panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Monday that the Drug Enforcement Administration does not need a court-ordered warrant to subpoena information from Oregon’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program. It also found the ACLU should not have been allowed to intervene in the case. (Associated Press photo) (AP Photo)

A federal appeals panel ruled Monday that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration can issue a subpoena for information in an Oregon database that tracks doctors and the narcotics they prescribe without getting a court order, reversing a lower court ruling.

The three-member panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals found the federal law that grants subpoena power to the agency preempts Oregon law, which requires a court order.

Congress enacted the Controlled Substances Act, in part, “to strengthen law enforcement tools against the traffic in illicit drugs” and allows federal authorities to obtain such information through a subpoena, the appeals panel noted.

State law directly conflicts with the federal statute, providing that the Oregon Health Authority disclose information from its prescription monitoring program in response to a court order based on probable cause.

Oregon’s law undermines the intent of Congress to empower the Drug Enforcement Administration, the panel ruled.

The appeals court also found that the U.S. District Court shouldn’t have allowed the American Civil Liberties Union to intervene in Oregon’s case against the DEA because it failed to establish independent standing.

U.S. District Judge Ancer L. Haggerty ruled in 2014 that patients have a reasonable expectation of privacy for their prescription records and that law enforcement officials must seek a warrant for information from Oregon’s database.

The Drug Enforcement Administration appealed.

The Oregon Legislature created the monitoring database in 2009 to log prescriptions filled by pharmacies in the state, the physicians who prescribed the narcotics and the patients who use them. The state included privacy protections, including the court order. The database went live two years later.

The Drug Enforcement Administration argued it could use administrative subpoenas under the Controlled Substances Act.

The state sued the agency after it issued three subpoenas for database information. The American Civil Liberties Union joined the case on behalf of four patients and a doctor, taking the state’s argument one step further in contending that federal agents must have probable cause and a signed search warrant for the information.

The subpoenas could violate a person’s Fourth Amendment right to privacy and unreasonable search and seizure, the ACLU argued. The ACLU sought a court injunction.

Haggerty didn’t analyze whether the ACLU had the right to intervene, and instead found that the DEA violated privacy rights asserted by the ACLU, the appeals panel’s opinion said.

“We reverse without reaching the merits of the Fourth Amendment claim,” the appeals panel said. Because the ACLU is seeking a different outcome than the state, it needed to show independent standing to intervene in the case and it did not, the panel ruled.

The DEA’s two administrative subpoenas sought records of a single patient and two prescribing physicians, not records related to the ACLU, the appeals court said.

The appeals panel said it recognized the “particularly private nature of the medical information” at issue and said the ACLU’s concern about disclosure wasn’t unreasonable. Yet even so, the ACLU lacked standing because it and those it represented weren’t “under an impending threat of disclosure.”

The appeals court did point out that the state still has the power to resist a DEA administrative subpoena, which would require the DEA to then get a court order for the information.

The appeals panel described this step as “a critical safeguard in light of the particularly important privacy interest implicated here.”

Attorney Nathan Freed Wessler, a New York-based lawyer who argued the appeal for the American Civil Liberties Union, said he was disappointed.

Next month, the ACLU will appear in federal court in Utah in a separate lawsuit and make the same argument that the DEA violates privacy rights by using “mere administrative subpoenas.”

“The court recognizes that medical records are private and sensitive and therefore require strong legal safeguards,” Wessler said. “Regrettably, it held that our clients lacked ‘standing’ to press for those safeguards in this litigation.”

[“Source-oregonlive”]